Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 138 of 146 FirstFirst ... 3888128134135136137138139140141142 ... LastLast
Results 1,371 to 1,380 of 1460

Thread: Wind Turbines: The end is nigh?

  1. #1371
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    2,756
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by valamhic View Post
    So are you saying that off - shore wind will be increased to replace the of-shore wind which will be decommissioned. Are you saying the the total wind capacity will increase, stay the same or decrease as a result of this decision?
    Honest answer can only be: I don't know. The politics may change, the sentiments may change, the economy environment may chance.
    However, I don't see a reason why the off-shore wind farms would decrease in capacity. The key is to get as much as possible and from as diverse mix of sources as possible. A diversification is very important here, as we're all aware, the renewables are usually not constant, the wind isn't constant, the sun isn't constant.

    Also note, we're tackling two separate issue here:
    1. SMOG, PM cancerogen particles directly affecting human health
    2. CO2 emmsion affecting the climate in the long run

    Moving away from coal and solid fuels towards natural gas already tackles the first issue, as natural gas burns clean.
    Moving to renewables tackles the second issue.

    Therefore a mix of renewables, backed by natural gas is a perfect temporary mix, until the time we can fully move to renewables. The natural gas dependance should be decreasing over time.

  2. #1372
    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Foreign, for my mental as well as material well-being
    Posts
    64,479
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Voluntary View Post
    Honest answer can only be: I don't know. The politics may change, the sentiments may change, the economy environment may chance.
    However, I don't see a reason why the off-shore wind farms would decrease in capacity. The key is to get as much as possible and from as diverse mix of sources as possible. A diversification is very important here, as we're all aware, the renewables are usually not constant, the wind isn't constant, the sun isn't constant.

    Also note, we're tackling two separate issue here:
    1. SMOG, PM cancerogen particles directly affecting human health
    2. CO2 emmsion affecting the climate in the long run

    Moving away from coal and solid fuels towards natural gas already tackles the first issue, as natural gas burns clean.
    Moving to renewables tackles the second issue.

    Therefore a mix of renewables, backed by natural gas is a perfect temporary mix, until the time we can fully move to renewables. The natural gas dependance should be decreasing over time.
    I'd only add that there's a third factor: the strategic issues relating to natural gas -- issues that the Poles are particularly sensitive to.

  3. #1373
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    2,756
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Toland View Post
    I'd only add that there's a third factor: the strategic issues relating to natural gas -- issues that the Poles are particularly sensitive to.
    Valid point, however...

    The rapid increase in the volumes of coal being imported from Russia is sensitive too and the rulling party has big troubles explaining the trend even to their core supporters:

    A new record of coal imports to Poland

    In the first ten months of 2018, coal imports to Poland exceeded 16 million tonnes - according to Eurostat data.


    The vast majority of imported coal - 69 percent. - came from Russia.

    Thus, the yearly record of coal imports from 2011, which amounted to 15 million tonnes of raw material, was also beaten.

    The increase in imports is accompanied by a decline in coal mining in the country. According to data from the Industrial Development Agency, from the beginning of 2018 until the end of November, Polish mines extracted in total about 58.6 million tons of coal, compared to nearly 60.4 million tons at the same time in 2017 (a decrease by approximately 1.8 million tons), and the volume of sales of this raw material amounted to approximately 57.8 million tonnes, against approx. 60.8 million tonnes in eleven months of 2017 (a decrease of approximately 3 million tonnes).
    A new record of coal imports to Poland


    Coal import from Russia was one of the main areas where the current rulling party used to attack the predecessor on. Now, they're in charge and the import from Russia didn't stop, moreover it rapidly increases.

  4. #1374
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    11,231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Hitachi Sees $2.8 Billion Hit on U.K. Nuclear Halt, Nikkei Says

    Hitachi pulling out of UK Wylfa nuclear project. It always amazed me how nonchalant we were about this. A nuke only 70 miles from Dublin. But, it seems to be no more. On one hand the UK govt was excoriated for guaranteeing a high price to EDF for its nuke, the attempt to extract a better deal here, has resulted in the project collapsing. Even after taking a massive charge/writedown, it seems investors a breathing a sigh of relief that Hitachi are out of it.

    While I've no axe to grind against nuclear power, it does seem like it is not economic in the present day.

    So, that leaves wind power backed up by gas as the way to go, and for once we did the right thing.

  5. #1375
    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Foreign, for my mental as well as material well-being
    Posts
    64,479
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Orbit v2 View Post
    Hitachi Sees $2.8 Billion Hit on U.K. Nuclear Halt, Nikkei Says

    Hitachi pulling out of UK Wylfa nuclear project. It always amazed me how nonchalant we were about this. A nuke only 70 miles from Dublin. But, it seems to be no more. On one hand the UK govt was excoriated for guaranteeing a high price to EDF for its nuke, the attempt to extract a better deal here, has resulted in the project collapsing. Even after taking a massive charge/writedown, it seems investors a breathing a sigh of relief that Hitachi are out of it.

    While I've no axe to grind against nuclear power, it does seem like it is not economic in the present day.

    So, that leaves wind power backed up by gas as the way to go, and for once we did the right thing.
    Not enough of the right thing. Not by a long shot yet.

  6. #1376
    Politics.ie Member hollandia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    The fence, the capital, the other bits and occasionally the foreign bits
    Posts
    30,454
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Toland View Post
    Not enough of the right thing. Not by a long shot yet.
    Other areas of renewables aren't getting the same level of investment yet. The Atlantic coast of Ireland and Western Scotland are ripe for tidal (extremely reliable) and wave energy (less reliable than tidal more reliable than wind). This area is seriously under represented.

    Solar farms are having some level of investment in southern Europe, but with huge farms and interconnectors planned for the Sahara.
    Belofte maakt schuld.

  7. #1377
    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Foreign, for my mental as well as material well-being
    Posts
    64,479
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by valamhic View Post
    If you don't know the difference between a historic and foretasted data, Sweat Jesus is your only hope.
    Dry up, valamhic

  8. #1378
    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Foreign, for my mental as well as material well-being
    Posts
    64,479
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hollandia View Post
    Other areas of renewables aren't getting the same level of investment yet. The Atlantic coast of Ireland and Western Scotland are ripe for tidal (extremely reliable) and wave energy (less reliable than tidal more reliable than wind). This area is seriously under represented.

    Solar farms are having some level of investment in southern Europe, but with huge farms and interconnectors planned for the Sahara.
    There are still serious barriers to all these technologies (with the possible exception of solar), but research is ongoing.

    There's a great wave power system in the little Basque village of Mutriku. The power plant is integrated into the town's new breakwater.




  9. #1379
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    2,756
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Anyone knows whene's the peak electricity usage time in Ireland? Is it daytime in summer months (July/August)?

  10. #1380

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •