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Thread: Broadband - are rural people being "thrown under a bus" by the government?

  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by LISTOWEL MAN View Post
    expecting Dublin speed internet in rural ireland is about as realistic as a person living in Dublin expecting the peace and quiet of rural ireland
    True. The seagulls are very noisy here.
    Quote Originally Posted by deepness View Post
    Its neither practical or affordable to give rural people the expectation that everyone will get 1Gb fibre to the home. But promises, promises, votes etc.
    The issue in a nutshell.

    I think it was also well framed by a poster on another site
    National Broadband Plan will cost the taxpayer over €2bn thepropertypin.com


    People are not assigned houses by a central planning bureau.

    For every house in Ireland that cannot access broadband, there are others a few kilometres away that can.

    Why don't people who really value broadband not just move house?
    However, banks know they have a duty of care to their clients and I'm sure that this should prevent them lending irresponsibly.

    George Lee 2 June 2006

    Ziggy

  2. #162
    Politics.ie Member paulp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 'orebel View Post

    The point is I'm within the new Cork city boundry and can't get decent landline broadband. I'd be delighted if I could get 15-20mbs. What hope for people in the boonies?
    That's pretty sh!t

    I don't know why we need one big plan to fix broadband for the country, as the bureaucracy around something of that scale means it takes so long and the slightest hiccup (dodgy dinner date) can set the whole thing back.

    I think they'd be much better breaking it down. Do a plan for Donegal, do a separate one for Cork. Whatever you learn from Donegal, used on the Connaught plan, or the rest of Munster plan etc
    There is no Keyser Soze

  3. #163
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    Agreed

  4. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulp View Post
    That's pretty sh!t

    I don't know why we need one big plan to fix broadband for the country, as the bureaucracy around something of that scale means it takes so long and the slightest hiccup (dodgy dinner date) can set the whole thing back.

    I think they'd be much better breaking it down. Do a plan for Donegal, do a separate one for Cork. Whatever you learn from Donegal, used on the Connaught plan, or the rest of Munster plan etc
    instead of one tendering process, multiple tenders? would the company that got the job for cork share information with the one that got it for donegal.


    fair point on anything of scale being thrown of for the slightest hicup but it would still be a project of scale even if multiple contractors are hired to do the job


    over 100 000 kms according to the video.

    Benefits of High Speed Broadband - YouTube

  5. #165
    Politics.ie Member Dame_Enda's Avatar
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    I've noticed that my mother's broadband (she lives in rural area) is a bit faster than last year. It used to struggle to get to 1mbps download speed. Now its regularly 5mbps. When I had fibre installed in town my broadband grew from 3-7 mbps dl speed to 50 mbps and now its 150mbps. Two tier system.

    Some of the criticism of rural broadband provision mirror those of criticisms of rural electrification in the 1950s and 60s.
    "A great city is not to be confounded with a populous one." - Aristotle

  6. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by LISTOWEL MAN View Post
    rural Ireland are odious people

    absolutely odious
    Why do you claim that?

  7. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by LISTOWEL MAN View Post
    expecting Dublin speed internet in rural ireland is about as realistic as a person living in Dublin expecting the peace and quiet of rural ireland
    Not true. It's amazing how people are so slow to catch onto the latest technology developments.

    The type of broadband you get in urban areas does not work well in rural areas, that is true because speed drops off dramatically with distance from the exchanges/cabinets, with broadband delivered over copper telephone wires. But, what is planned here is fibre (all the way) to the home. This works very well with the typical Irish rural settlement pattern and its speed doesn't degrade over distances up to at least 30km because it is optical and not electrically based.

    There's been a rear-guard action lately to muddy the waters by falsely claiming that fibre could be obsolete in a few years, or that it might be replaced in a few years by better wireless technologies. The only people peddling this nonsense are the vested interests selling the wireless technology and those with an axe to grind against rural dwellers.

    What's happening here is a bit like the 80s/90s when the country switched from ancient manual telephone exchanges to modern digital systems, leap-frogging the electro-mechanical systems that were common in the rest of the developed world. Rural areas will never have DSL broadband (or cable) like urban areas. They will go straight to fibre, and far from fibre becoming obsolete, over the next ten to 15 years, urban areas will catch up with rural ones, by replacing the obsolete DSL network with fibre to the home. Today you can can speeds up to 1Gbps from fibre. And soon that will go higher to 2.5G and beyond. It's physically impossible to get speeds like that out of your ordinary telephone lines in urban areas.

  8. #168
    Politics.ie Member LISTOWEL MAN's Avatar
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    more rural ireland talk last night on the ivan yates show

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    We all want quicker broadband speeds, most especially rural Ireland but beware of 5G....the 5th generation of broadband cellular network technology.
    To date there have been over 10,000 peer related studies showing that radio frequency radiation (RF) and electromagnetic (EM) radiation is harmful to life. (see powerwatch.org.uk and Environmental Health Trust Environmental Health Trust - Education, Research, and Policy to Reduce Environmental Risks. for a list of studies).
    Studies assessing cancer and wireless radiation are particularly disturbing. The World Health Organisation's (W.H.O) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified microwave radiation from ALL wireless devices as a possible human cause of cancer in 2011.

    At the moment, most people in Ireland can access 4G (4th Generation) broadband cellular network technology. Exposure to EM radiation is bad enough as things stand, but in the Dublin Docklands, Dungarvan, Gorey, Clonmel and Roscommon, 5G technology is being or soon will be tested, followed eventually by the rest of the country.

    5G is being sold to us as enabling high speed internet, super quick download speeds, 'smart' devices including smart cities, smart cars etc and the 'Internet of Things' (ie where all products are connected wirelessly to the internet). In practice, this means that exposure to EM radiation will increase exponentially as 5G technology makes use of ultra high frequency radiation. It also means that many thousands of small cell antennas will be built everywhere, including beside houses and schools, as is already happening across the United States (although they are being bitterly opposed). Recently more than 230 scientists and doctors from more than 40 countries have warned of the dangers of 5G and in an appeal to the E.U. have recommended a moratorium on its’ implementation. (The appeal – 5G Appeal 5G Appeal).

    In addition, 5G uses millimetre wave technology which operates on the same frequency band as the U.S. military uses for crowd control (people feel as if their skin is burning). It is no wonder then, that UN staff member Claire Edwards called this technology a 'War on Humanity'.

  10. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orbit v2 View Post
    Not true. It's amazing how people are so slow to catch onto the latest technology developments.

    The type of broadband you get in urban areas does not work well in rural areas, that is true because speed drops off dramatically with distance from the exchanges/cabinets, with broadband delivered over copper telephone wires. But, what is planned here is fibre (all the way) to the home. This works very well with the typical Irish rural settlement pattern and its speed doesn't degrade over distances up to at least 30km because it is optical and not electrically based.

    There's been a rear-guard action lately to muddy the waters by falsely claiming that fibre could be obsolete in a few years, or that it might be replaced in a few years by better wireless technologies. The only people peddling this nonsense are the vested interests selling the wireless technology and those with an axe to grind against rural dwellers.

    What's happening here is a bit like the 80s/90s when the country switched from ancient manual telephone exchanges to modern digital systems, leap-frogging the electro-mechanical systems that were common in the rest of the developed world. Rural areas will never have DSL broadband (or cable) like urban areas. They will go straight to fibre, and far from fibre becoming obsolete, over the next ten to 15 years, urban areas will catch up with rural ones, by replacing the obsolete DSL network with fibre to the home. Today you can can speeds up to 1Gbps from fibre. And soon that will go higher to 2.5G and beyond. It's physically impossible to get speeds like that out of your ordinary telephone lines in urban areas.
    I'm in a once off house and get eir fibre.



    It's A1. Faster that what many in Dublin have.
    We appreciate the move by the Government today and remind ourselves that it is a bail-out by taxpayers for the banks. Pearse Doherty

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