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100 billion potential Earth-like planets in Milky Way Galaxy


Drogheda445

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Scientists at New Zealand's University of Auckland have estimated the number of Earth-like planet's in our galaxy alone to be around 100 billion, which means that their could be 1 Earth-like planet for ever 2 stars in the Milky Way (around 200 billion stars in total).

There could be 100 billion Earth-like planets say astronomers - Telegraph

They have based their estimates on observations by the Kepler Space Observatory. More than 800 exoplanets have been discovered so far, mainly from observing dips in the light of the star as the planets pass in front of them or from wobbles in the stars position (due to the gravitational influence of orbiting planets). This number is rising rapidly, and as more observatories are planned to be launched in coming years (such as the James Webb Space Telescope), the likelihood of observing smaller planets (which may be Earth-like in size) will increase as the sensitivity improves.

Considering the sheer number of planets like our own that could potentially be found within our own galaxy, I think it would be exceedingly unlikely that ours would be the only one to harbour intelligent life, let alone life itself. Your thoughts?
 

greykettle

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"Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying."
 

mhagain

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Throughout the history of science, every single time that the Earth has been thought to be in any way special or different, it's been rammed home pretty conclusively that it's not. Of course there is other life out there; there's no reason whatsoever for there not to be and that should be enough to convice anyone. It's only a matter of time until hard evidence appears.
 

PO'Neill

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Scientists at New Zealand's University of Auckland have estimated the number of Earth-like planet's in our galaxy alone to be around 100 billion, which means that their could be 1 Earth-like planet for ever 2 stars in the Milky Way (around 200 billion stars in total).

There could be 100 billion Earth-like planets say astronomers - Telegraph

They have based their estimates on observations by the Kepler Space Observatory. More than 800 exoplanets have been discovered so far, mainly from observing dips in the light of the star as the planets pass in front of them or from wobbles in the stars position (due to the gravitational influence of orbiting planets). This number is rising rapidly, and as more observatories are planned to be launched in coming years (such as the James Webb Space Telescope), the likelihood of observing smaller planets (which may be Earth-like in size) will increase as the sensitivity improves.

Considering the sheer number of planets like our own that could potentially be found within our own galaxy, I think it would be exceedingly unlikely that ours would be the only one to harbour intelligent life, let alone life itself. Your thoughts?
The 13 year old is at it again :roll:
 

jpc

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Life out there deffo!
Sentient life maybe?
 
D

Dylan2010

the age of the galaxy has to be taken into account, a million years is a galactic "blink" , so societies may have come and gone or might only make an appearance in 50 million years time. then if no faster than light travel is possible then there can be no meaningful communication.
 

mhagain

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Communication isn't necessary; just confirmation that other life exists is enough.

In order to prove that other life doesn't exist, you have to check every planet around every star in every galaxy in the entire universe. In order to prove that other life does exist you just have to find it once. One can only ever be a matter of faith, the other is a matter of science.

The ancients thought that the sun was special, somehow different to other stars. Then it was discovered that the sun was just another typical star. Then people thought that a star having planets was special. Guess what happened there? Now we're finding planets everywhere, Earth-like planets everywhere, evidence of water everywhere.

It's clear that the processes that made our little corner of the universe are not in any way special; it's clear that they're actually quite typical. Why should the processes that made us not be the same?
 

Zerubbabel

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There's bound to be something out there more intelligent than lifeforms who insist on electing the likes of Bertie, Gilmore, Inda etc. to be their leaders.



 
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Nemesiscorporation

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Scientists at New Zealand's University of Auckland have estimated the number of Earth-like planet's in our galaxy alone to be around 100 billion, which means that their could be 1 Earth-like planet for ever 2 stars in the Milky Way (around 200 billion stars in total).

There could be 100 billion Earth-like planets say astronomers - Telegraph

They have based their estimates on observations by the Kepler Space Observatory. More than 800 exoplanets have been discovered so far, mainly from observing dips in the light of the star as the planets pass in front of them or from wobbles in the stars position (due to the gravitational influence of orbiting planets). This number is rising rapidly, and as more observatories are planned to be launched in coming years (such as the James Webb Space Telescope), the likelihood of observing smaller planets (which may be Earth-like in size) will increase as the sensitivity improves.

Considering the sheer number of planets like our own that could potentially be found within our own galaxy, I think it would be exceedingly unlikely that ours would be the only one to harbour intelligent life, let alone life itself. Your thoughts?
The exoplanet search is getting more interesting by the day.

They have even found brown dwarfs in our stellar neighbourhood.

The sheer number of planets is increasing the likelyhood that there is life out there.

Most likely any life would be single celled or virus like.

Multicell life is a serious evolutionary step.

Docovering multicell life, would lead to serious upheavals in our societies.

The discovery of intelligent multicell life that is more advanced than us, would be the ultimate shock to human culture. All of our political ideas, ideologies, religions, beliefs, etc would be shook to the core and ultimately superceded by the more advanced alien culture.
 

gerhard dengler

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Scientists at New Zealand's University of Auckland have estimated the number of Earth-like planet's in our galaxy alone to be around 100 billion, which means that their could be 1 Earth-like planet for ever 2 stars in the Milky Way (around 200 billion stars in total).

There could be 100 billion Earth-like planets say astronomers - Telegraph

They have based their estimates on observations by the Kepler Space Observatory. More than 800 exoplanets have been discovered so far, mainly from observing dips in the light of the star as the planets pass in front of them or from wobbles in the stars position (due to the gravitational influence of orbiting planets). This number is rising rapidly, and as more observatories are planned to be launched in coming years (such as the James Webb Space Telescope), the likelihood of observing smaller planets (which may be Earth-like in size) will increase as the sensitivity improves.

Considering the sheer number of planets like our own that could potentially be found within our own galaxy, I think it would be exceedingly unlikely that ours would be the only one to harbour intelligent life, let alone life itself. Your thoughts?
100 billion is a figure which is difficult to comprehend. And that's only in this galaxy.

I agree with you, the chances are that there has to be other forms of life somewhere out there.
 

Ryan Tubbs

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Considering the sheer number of planets like our own that could potentially be found within our own galaxy, I think it would be exceedingly unlikely that ours would be the only one to harbour intelligent life, let alone life itself. Your thoughts?
It is statistically impossible for there NOT to be intelligent life elsewhere, given the sheer size of the universe.

Not only that, but given that we have to presume that the same basic elements and laws of physics apply to the rest of the universe, we can assume (with relative safety) that life would evolve in relatively the same way on other planets as it has here.

It is mind-blowing, but it given the sheer size of the universe, it's just impossible for it NOT to have happened.

The problems are two-fold though:-

1) The sheer size of the universe. It is so utterly vast that there could be thousands of planets with civilizations similar to our own as we sit here typing, but because of the distances between us we can never know, and neither will they.

2). The universe has existed for 13.77 billion years. Life on earth has existed for 2 billion years, with humans evolving just 200,000 years ago. So human beings have existed for just 0.001% of the lifetime of the universe. And considering that we have only become technologically advanced in the last 100 years.......... hundreds of thousands of civilisations such as our own could have existed and died out before we even evolved, and we would never have known.
 

Ryan Tubbs

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only the second option is scary in my opinion.
Only because of our misconception, courtesy of popular culture, that any other civilisations would be hostile, bent on enslaving us on stealing our natural resources.

Thinking logically, it is highly unlikely that a species which has managed to exist long enough without destroying itself to become capable of interstellar travel is going to be hostile or barborous.
 

pippakin

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If they are out there and I think it very likely I hope they have beter bankers, politicians and property developers than we on this little planet appear to. Or could it be...........
 

greykettle

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........................
......... hundreds of thousands of civilisations such as our own could have existed and died out before we even evolved, and we would never have known.
The potential for a space version of Time Team is huge. Excavating long-dead super-advanced civilizations would make good TV.
 
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