100 years ago today 25 September 1917 - Thomas Ashe died on Hunger Strike for Ireland

Catalpast

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100 years ago today one of the most significant events of Modern Irish History took place when Thomas Ashe, a Hero of the 1916 Rising died on Hunger Strike after being Force Fed by the Prison Authorities in Mountjoy Jail Dublin.

25 September 1917: Thomas Ashe died on this day. It was the 5th day of his Hunger Strike to secure Political Status for Republican prisoners. He was born in Kinard, a townland on the eastern side of the Dingle Peninsula, Co Kerry. His parents, Gregory Ashe and Ellen Hanafin, were farmers. They spoke English and Irish in their household and were strong Nationalists. Thomas trained to be a Teacher at De La Salle Training College, Waterford in 1905 and began his teaching career as principal of Corduff National School, Lusk Co Dublin in 1908. He taught Irish in the Corduff school. He was fond of the Irish language and started branches of the Gaelic League in Skerries and other neighbouring villages.

Ashe joined the Irish Volunteers upon its foundation in November 1913. He was a member of the Keating Branch of the Gaelic League. He was also a member of the Lusk company of the Volunteers and probably founded it. He sat on the governing body of the Gaelic League and collected considerable sums of money during a trip to the USA in 1914 for both the Volunteers and the League.


He took part in the Easter Rising in 1916. Ashe was commandant of 5th battalion of the Dublin brigade; a force of 60–70 men engaged British forces around north County Dublin during the Rising. His column met with some success at the village of Ashbourne in north Co Dublin. Eleven RIC members, including County Inspector Alexander Gray, and two volunteers were killed during the five-and-a-half-hour battle.


He was tried by the British and along with Eamon de Valera was sentenced to death but these were commuted and both were given Life in prison instead. They were sent to serve their sentences in Frognoch Internment Camp Wales.


Released from captivity in June 1917 the was in August again arrested and charged with 'sedition' for a speech that he had made in Ballinalee, County Longford. He was detained at the Curragh but was then transferred to Mountjoy Prison in Dublin. He was convicted and sentenced to two years hard labour. Ashe and other prisoners, including Austin Stack demanded prisoner of war status.


As this protest evolved Ashe again went on hunger strike on 20 September 1917. As this was a breach of prison discipline the authorities retaliated by taking away the prisoners' beds, bedding and boots. After five or six days lying on a cold stone floor the prisoners were subjected to forcible feeding. On 25 September, his fellow Kerryman, Fionan Lynch saw Ashe being carried away to receive this treatment and called out to him: ' Stick it Tom boy'. Ashe called back 'I'll stick it, Fin'. That was the last time they spoke to each other. Ashe was carried back, blue in the face and unconscious. He was removed to the Mater Hospital across the road from the prison where he died within a few hours.


His death on Hunger Strike had a huge impact both at home and abroad. It reminded the Irish People once again that there were men prepared to give their lives for Ireland until she was Free from Foreign Rule. 30,000 people filed past his coffin layed out in State in the City Hall.


At the inquest into his death, the jury condemned the staff at the prison for the "inhuman and dangerous operation performed on the prisoner, and other acts of unfeeling and barbaric conduct". His death through being forced fed elicited widespread revulsion amongst the Irish people and his funeral acted as a catalyst to the further growth of the Sinn Fein Party and Republican ideals.
 


Hillmanhunter1

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The words "died on Hunger Strike" suggest that Tom Ashe starved himself to death on a point of principle.

He might or might not have done - we will never know - because he was beaten to death after six days.
 

PO'Neill

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[video=youtube;HrLd5E1f1Fc]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrLd5E1f1Fc[/video]
 

Bea C

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Vigil in town tonight.
 

Hillmanhunter1

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Well he certinly didnt die for the Ireland we have today.
The only certainty is that we have no idea what kind of Ireland Ashe might have wished for - how he might have responded to the Treaty for example.
 

NMunsterman

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100 years ago today one of the most significant events of Modern Irish History took place when Thomas Ashe, a Hero of the 1916 Rising died on Hunger Strike after being Force Fed by the Prison Authorities in Mountjoy Jail Dublin.

25 September 1917: Thomas Ashe died on this day. It was the 5th day of his Hunger Strike to secure Political Status for Republican prisoners. He was born in Kinard, a townland on the eastern side of the Dingle Peninsula, Co Kerry. His parents, Gregory Ashe and Ellen Hanafin, were farmers. They spoke English and Irish in their household and were strong Nationalists. Thomas trained to be a Teacher at De La Salle Training College, Waterford in 1905 and began his teaching career as principal of Corduff National School, Lusk Co Dublin in 1908. He taught Irish in the Corduff school. He was fond of the Irish language and started branches of the Gaelic League in Skerries and other neighbouring villages.

Ashe joined the Irish Volunteers upon its foundation in November 1913. He was a member of the Keating Branch of the Gaelic League. He was also a member of the Lusk company of the Volunteers and probably founded it. He sat on the governing body of the Gaelic League and collected considerable sums of money during a trip to the USA in 1914 for both the Volunteers and the League.


He took part in the Easter Rising in 1916. Ashe was commandant of 5th battalion of the Dublin brigade; a force of 60–70 men engaged British forces around north County Dublin during the Rising. His column met with some success at the village of Ashbourne in north Co Dublin. Eleven RIC members, including County Inspector Alexander Gray, and two volunteers were killed during the five-and-a-half-hour battle.


He was tried by the British and along with Eamon de Valera was sentenced to death but these were commuted and both were given Life in prison instead. They were sent to serve their sentences in Frognoch Internment Camp Wales.


Released from captivity in June 1917 the was in August again arrested and charged with 'sedition' for a speech that he had made in Ballinalee, County Longford. He was detained at the Curragh but was then transferred to Mountjoy Prison in Dublin. He was convicted and sentenced to two years hard labour. Ashe and other prisoners, including Austin Stack demanded prisoner of war status.


As this protest evolved Ashe again went on hunger strike on 20 September 1917. As this was a breach of prison discipline the authorities retaliated by taking away the prisoners' beds, bedding and boots. After five or six days lying on a cold stone floor the prisoners were subjected to forcible feeding. On 25 September, his fellow Kerryman, Fionan Lynch saw Ashe being carried away to receive this treatment and called out to him: ' Stick it Tom boy'. Ashe called back 'I'll stick it, Fin'. That was the last time they spoke to each other. Ashe was carried back, blue in the face and unconscious. He was removed to the Mater Hospital across the road from the prison where he died within a few hours.


His death on Hunger Strike had a huge impact both at home and abroad. It reminded the Irish People once again that there were men prepared to give their lives for Ireland until she was Free from Foreign Rule. 30,000 people filed past his coffin layed out in State in the City Hall.


At the inquest into his death, the jury condemned the staff at the prison for the "inhuman and dangerous operation performed on the prisoner, and other acts of unfeeling and barbaric conduct". His death through being forced fed elicited widespread revulsion amongst the Irish people and his funeral acted as a catalyst to the further growth of the Sinn Fein Party and Republican ideals.
Very brave Irish men and women stood up to the colonial terrorism and murder carried out by the British state in Ireland - and were prepared to pay the ultimate personal sacrifice.
Thanks to enormously brave individuals like Thomas Ashe we have an independent Irish state today.

Unfinished business remains - and will not be completed until the entire country is independent.
 

freewillie

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A true Irish patriot who stood up against tyranny.
And we still have brave men like hunger striker and water charge protester Derek Byrne who will inspire future generations
 

Hillmanhunter1

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And we still have brave men like hunger striker and water charge protester Derek Byrne who will inspire future generations
Thomas Ashe died for an independent Ireland.

Some muppet decides to skip lunch as a protest against a fair and proportionate tax applied by the Government of that independent Ireland and you draw parallels.

Gimme a break!
 

Connollyist a/c no.2

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Very brave Irish men and women stood up to the colonial terrorism and murder carried out by the British state in Ireland - and were prepared to pay the ultimate personal sacrifice.
Thanks to enormously brave individuals like Thomas Ashe we have an independent Irish state today.

Unfinished business remains - and will not be completed until the entire country is independent.
arent you forgeting about the eu? They take away our sovereignty. ashe would have opposed eu rule in ireland as much as he would have opposed british rule in ireland

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/19/how-does-the-eu-impinge-on-british-sovereignty-and-if-the-uk-vot/
 

Aindriu

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The words "died on Hunger Strike" suggest that Tom Ashe starved himself to death on a point of principle.

He might or might not have done - we will never know - because he was beaten to death after six days.
My understanding is that they passed the tube into the broncus instead of the oesophaegus and poured liquid food into his lungs. That compromised the lungs and he died as a result of that.
 

PO'Neill

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He died for an independent all-ireland republic, we dont have that.
And neither was it a " a fair and proportionate tax applied by the Government " as it was a bogus company set up for privatization.
 


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