120 students in Dingle protest over policy of new school

DJP

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According to the Nuacht on TG4 120 students from a school in Dingle refused to go into school today as a protest at the schools new Irish-language policy.

Pobalscoil Chorca Dhuibhne began teaching last month, after the amalgamation of two local schools. Only one of those schools was a gaelscoil. Hence there are a lot of pupils who argubably do not have the standard of Irish for a second-level gaelscoil or gaelcholáiste.

There was a public meeting on the issue a couple of days ago with many parents arguing that the school should have an as Béarla stream.
 


Joe Ryan

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Is this anywhere near the place in Kerry (An Daingean?) where pupils allegedly burnt down their secondary school about a year ago? :evil:
 

Trefor

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
According to the Nuacht on TG4 120 students from a school in Dingle refused to go into school today as a protest at the schools new Irish-language policy.

Pobalscoil Chorca Dhuibhne began teaching last month, after the amalgamation of two local schools. Only one of those schools was a gaelscoil. Hence there are a lot of pupils who argubably do not have the standard of Irish for a second-level gaelscoil or gaelcholáiste.

There was a public-meeting on the issue a couple of days ago with many parents arguing that the school should have an as Béarla stream.
Amalgamating two schools that use two different language mediums is crazy.

Whoever pushed the idea should be shot.
 

DJP

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I agree, its totally impractical. What about students that finished third year in the CBS? They are now supposed to do their L Cert through Irish?
 

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I agree, its totally impractical. What about students that finished third year in the CBS? They are now supposed to do their L Cert through Irish?
It should have been possible to provide a 'mixed language' stream for two or three years just to get the senior classes through their leaving cert. But I don't really have much sympathy for their situation. They are living in a Gaeltacht and their school is in a Gaeltacht. Why haven't they made an effort to learn the language?
 

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Coles said:
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I agree, its totally impractical. What about students that finished third year in the CBS? They are now supposed to do their L Cert through Irish?
It should have been possible to provide a 'mixed language' stream for two or three years just to get the senior classes through their leaving cert. But I don't really have much sympathy for their situation. They are living in a Gaeltacht and their school is in a Gaeltacht. Why haven't they made an effort to learn the language?
Not the point.

I don't sympathise with them either, but if you push them into an Irish medium school, they'll Anglicise it.
 

DJP

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Trefor said:
Coles said:
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I agree, its totally impractical. What about students that finished third year in the CBS? They are now supposed to do their L Cert through Irish?
It should have been possible to provide a 'mixed language' stream for two or three years just to get the senior classes through their leaving cert. But I don't really have much sympathy for their situation. They are living in a Gaeltacht and their school is in a Gaeltacht. Why haven't they made an effort to learn the language?
Not the point.

I don't sympathise with them either, but if you push them into an Irish medium school, they'll Anglicise it.
What are you talking about?

The management of the school said they would not provide an English language stream. How are the students that have not gone to a gaelscoil before expected to be able to do their Junior and Leaving Cert through Irish?

Also, I could have been wrong but according to Slugger O'Toole neither of the two previous schools were gaelscoileanna- although one might have had quasi-status.

Finally, Dingle is as much in the Gaeltacht as parts of Galway city are. Hence it isn't in the Gaeltacht- only offically, which means nothing.
 

Riadach

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Now now lads, no reason to fight over it.
 

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Dingle isn't in the Gaeltacht- only offically, which means nothing.
Means nothing? I think these students are finding out that it means quite a bit more than 'nothing', particularly as they are looking for the State to provide them with an education.
 

DJP

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Yea, and the promotion of Irish suffers because of it. People don't like language fascists forcing the language down their throat. People also don't like to be fooled into thinking that Dingle is a real Gaeltacht area (as in on-the-ground realistic) as well.

I am not saying that the board of mangagement of the school are fascists, but by being rigid they are feeding the argument.
 

Riadach

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Regardless of whether it is in the real gaeltacht, (and we know it isn't) given that it's the nearest big town to Gaeltacht Chorca Dhuibhne, it is an important catchment area for Irish. Any Irish speaker from that area who wished to be employed in something other than the beer or farming industry would have to rely on Dingle. Therefore if there is infrastructure within dingle to ensure that such a movement would not alter the Irish speaking culture of those mini-migrants, we really should not allow it to be undermined.
 

draiocht23

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I heard one of the students being interviewed on Morning Ireland and he seemed quite coherent and articulate, for a young rabble-rouser. He was speaking in English though.
 

Akrasia

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they'll pick up Irish fast enough if they're immersed in it, and there are bonus points for students who do the LC through Irish.

There's a lesson in this, don't move to a gaeltacht area if you're not prepared to speak the language. (I bet a lot of the people who are pissed off at the school are the same people who give out about all the foreigners living here who don't speak any english)
 

DJP

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draiocht23 said:
I heard one of the students being interviewed on Morning Ireland and he seemed quite coherent and articulate, for a young rabble-rouser. He was speaking in English though.
Which is not surprising given that Morning Ireland is as Béarla mostly, and that Dingle is a mostly English speaking town.
 

Riadach

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Akrasia said:
they'll pick up Irish fast enough if they're immersed in it, and there are bonus points for students who do language through Irish.

There's a lesson in this, don't move to a gaeltacht area if you're not prepared to speak the language. (I bet a lot of the people who are pissed off at the school are the same people who give out about all the foreigners living here who don't speak any english)
A lot of these children though, the 120 or so who have little or no competency in Irish, are locals, and their families are local too. There is no real migration involved here, Dingle has a tradition of being an island of english speakers in a predominantly Irish speaking area.
 

DJP

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Akrasia said:
There's a lesson in this, don't move to a gaeltacht area if you're not prepared to speak the language.
I'd be surprised if there were many people from outside of Dingle being particularly vocal on this as they would be perceived as being anti-Irish language. The people that are complaining are native people of the area, and as was shown on an RTE Nuacht feature on this issue, they are certainly not against the Irish language.
 

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Yea, and the promotion of Irish suffers because of it. People don't like language fascists forcing the language down their throat. People also don't like to be fooled into thinking that Dingle is a real Gaeltacht area (as in on-the-ground realistic) as well.

I am not saying that the board of management of the school are fascists, but by being rigid they are feeding the argument.
The board of management of any school are appointed to promote and defend the ethos of the school. They should (and will) do whatever is in the best interest of their school. I have already said that I believe that a mixed language stream should be provided for two or three years in order to assist some students through their leaving cert. I am on the board of management of a gaelscoil, and a significant part my role on that board is to protect the ethos of the school.
 

draiocht23

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Akrasia said:
There's a lesson in this, don't move to a gaeltacht area if you're not prepared to speak the language. (I bet a lot of the people who are pissed off at the school are the same people who give out about all the foreigners living here who don't speak any english)
It's a school and a student protest? They don't have much choice about where they live and four different schools were amalgamated. I'm for the teanga, but I don't want to see it shoved down peoples' necks either....they'll just end up hating it.
 

DJP

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draiocht23 said:
Akrasia said:
There's a lesson in this, don't move to a gaeltacht area if you're not prepared to speak the language. (I bet a lot of the people who are pissed off at the school are the same people who give out about all the foreigners living here who don't speak any english)
It's a school and a student protest? They don't have much choice about where they live and four different schools were amalgamated. I'm for the teanga, but I don't want to see it shoved down peoples' necks either....they'll just end up hating it.
There were two schools amalgamated.

Coles said:
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Yea, and the promotion of Irish suffers because of it. People don't like language fascists forcing the language down their throat. People also don't like to be fooled into thinking that Dingle is a real Gaeltacht area (as in on-the-ground realistic) as well.

I am not saying that the board of management of the school are fascists, but by being rigid they are feeding the argument.
The board of management of any school are appointed to promote and defend the ethos of the school. They should (and will) do whatever is in the best interest of their school. I have already said that I believe that a mixed language stream should be provided for two or three years in order to assist some students through their leaving cert. I am on the board of management of a gaelscoil, and a significant part my role on that board is to protect the ethos of the school.
Yea, and the board of management said that they would not provide anything other than a few days classes in Irish for those that needed it. A mixed stream is a good idea. I never heard that mentioned, although I don't know if the board of management would go for it.
 


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