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15 Years since the Good Friday Agreement was signed today


Rocky

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As the thread title says it's 15 years today since the Good Friday Agreement was signed.

And through that a good time to look at what was achieved that night, since and what still has to be achieved.

Obviously a fundamental day though and one of the most important in the history of the island. There has been many stumbles and struggles, but thankfully it's never completely fall apart and we have never gone back to where we were before that faithful day.

Good article here in the Times today about the events of the day itself:

Night of almost unbearable pressure gave way to day of history - Political News | Irish & International Politics | The Irish Times - Wed, Apr 10, 2013
 


sauntersplash

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Everything changed for me that day. Everything.

That faithful day when a couple of hundred psychopaths decided it was finally time for their careers to move on.
 

Hitch 22

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It was advancing age that really brought the conflict to an end.

The hotheaded teenagers and twenty-somethings of the late 1960s and 1970s were tired paunchy middle aged and going gray by the late 1990s with grandkids to think of. They had spent most of the adult lives in jail or on the run or looking over their shoulder. Enough was enough.

When Adams and Paisley finally sat down together in 2007 it was only after SF had overtaken the SDLP as the voice of Irish nationalism in Northern Ireland and Paisley had finally slain his Unionist enemies.

The two biggest egos would only finally conclude the peace when they alone held power over their own tribe.
 

Aristodemus

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Everything changed for me that day. Everything.

That faithful day when a couple of hundred psychopaths decided it was finally time for their careers to move on.
They haven't gone away you know
 

sauntersplash

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It was advancing age that really brought the conflict to an end.

The hotheaded teenagers and twenty-somethings of the late 1960s and 1970s were tired paunchy middle aged and going gray by the late 1990s. They had spent most of the adult lives in jail or on the run or looking over their shoulder. Enough was enough.

When Adams and Paisley finally sat down together in 2007 it was only after SF had overtaken the SDLP as the voice of Irish nationalism in Northern Ireland and Paisley had finally slain his Unionist enemies.

The two biggest egos would only finally conclude the peace when they alone held power over their own tribe.
I would like to concur.
 

'orebel

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That faithful day????????

Begorrah.
 

sauntersplash

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That faithful day????????

Begorrah.
O that faithful day when the warrior poets of the sink estates of the north east of this little rock finally decided to rest and clean each others wounds in the name of baby Jesus inventing the first chocolate egg.

FREEDOM!
 

Keith-M

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It was far from perfect (that's why I didn't vote for it) but with the finessing that came at Saint Andrews it was improved to the point where I would support it. Obviously the biggest win for everyone was the constitutional realisation of the principle of consent, which normalised this country's relationship with the U.K.

There are still two things which I would like to see worked on. Firstly, the designation in Stormont which entrenches the tribal tradition there and handicaps cross-community parties like APNI. I would prefer a qualified majority system with a 66% or 75% threshold, thereby ensuring cross community support but allowing a proper opposition (which is essential for accountability) to be formed. Secondly, I don't like the fact that people born in another country and who may never have set foot on this side of the border are automatically entitled to Irish citizenship and passports. It cheapens Irish citzenship by breaking the residency link with this country.
 
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One detail from the day remains with me.

Driving to work, I was listening to RTE Radio. Before the news at one o'clock there was a teaser for the programme leading to ads before the programme itself started. Brian Dobson previewed the programme from Stormont, saying that it would be covering the negotiations etc etc, before adding that they would also be discussing George Mitchell's coming out as homosexual.

After the ad break, there were apologies. Apparently he'd meant George Michael.
 

Clanrickard

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It should be renegotiated as that crawler Aherne gave too much away.
 

Pat Mc Larnon

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When Adams and Paisley finally sat down together in 2007 it was only after SF had overtaken the SDLP as the voice of Irish nationalism in Northern Ireland and Paisley had finally slain his Unionist enemies.
Sinn Féin overtook the SDLP in the 2001 Westminster and local government elections. Plus it was Mc Guinness who sat down with Paisley. It is possible to conclude that there is not a subject dealing with the 6 counties that you are capable of getting right.
 

Hitch 22

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Sinn Féin overtook the SDLP in the 2001 Westminster and local government elections. Plus it was Mc Guinness who sat down with Paisley. It is possible to conclude that there is not a subject dealing with the 6 counties that you are capable of getting right.


March 2007 was the first time Adams and Paisley sat around the same table and power sharing recommenced the following May.

The IRA had finally decommissioned in 2005 while the British Army's Operation Banner would end in July 2007.

Adams by that stage had consolidated SF's dominance of Irish nationalism in NI and the DUP had meanwhile eclipsed the Ulster Unionists.

All the pieces had fallen into place.

It was a key moment that signaled an end to the Northern Ireland Troubles.

The two people who more than anyone else had been responsible for decades of violence - Adams as a leading commander and strategist of the Provos and Paisley who had whipped up sectarian hatred.
 

meriwether

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It was far from perfect (that's why I didn't vote for it) but with the finessing that came at Saint Andrews it was improved to the point where I would support it. Obviously the biggest win for everyone was the constitutional realisation of the principle of consent, which normalised this country's relationship with the U.K.

There are still two things which I would like to see worked on. Firstly, the designation in Stormont which entrenches the tribal tradition there and handicaps cross-community parties like APNI. I would prefer a qualified majority system with a 66% or 75% threshold, thereby ensuring cross community support but allowing a proper opposition (which is essential for accountability) to be formed. Secondly, I don't like the fact that people born in another country and who may never have set foot on this side of the border are automatically entitled to Irish citizenship and passports. It cheapens Irish citzenship by breaking the residency link with this country.
What was your alternative?
 

Rocky

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