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150 year old private school to close


seabhcan

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Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
14,327
The only fee-paying primary school in Limerick is to close in June. 2013 is its 150th year.

The school gets no funding of any kind from the state, and falling pupil numbers means that the 50 or so kids who attend St Philomena's will now have to be accommodated in state funded schools. I have been told that the Dept Education refused to take control of the school and convert it into a national school. St Philomenas had quite a good reputation for helping less gifted kids and had a very good arts and drama program, with several former pupils now working in the arts.

Limerick fee-paying school forced to close - Education - Limerick Leader
 

ger12

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Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
48,255
Oh dear. How will the pupils manage in the public school system now ...
 

Congalltee

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Nov 10, 2009
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6,211
The vast majority of a schools in the State are privately owned. Teachers pay is usually paid for by the State.
 

stakerwallace

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Feb 27, 2011
Messages
13,434
The vast majority of a schools in the State are privately owned. Teachers pay is usually paid for by the State.
Property may be privately owned but the salaries are paid, a curriculum from the state is implemented, inspections are held, teachers must be recognised primary teachers to be employed in a permanent capacity, DES circulars must be followed and capitation grants are received. In the case of St Philomena's the property is privately owned but all the other factors do not apply.
 

Goa Tse

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Dec 27, 2010
Messages
2,280
Ghastly, simply ghastly. How are Fuinneog, Sadbh, Leithreas and Fionn going to cope in the public school system?

I hear that some of the children in the public schools come from one-parent families, and that several of them have nits.
Rest assured I shall be complaining to the ladies at the Book Club.
 

stakerwallace

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Feb 27, 2011
Messages
13,434
Ghastly, simply ghastly. How are Fuinneog, Sadbh, Leithreas and Fionn going to cope in the public school system?

I hear that some of the children in the public schools come from one-parent families, and that several of them have nits.
Rest assured I shall be complaining to the ladies at the Book Club.
I think all those names mentioned above are already happily ensconced in a Gael Scoil which is state funded but without too many "ríff agus ráff."
 

Goa Tse

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Dec 27, 2010
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I think all those names mentioned above are already happily ensconced in a Gael Scoil which is state funded but without too many "ríff agus ráff."
Gael Scoil? Damn foreigners, should be sent back to where they came from! Damned if I let little Redmond, Edward, and Carson mix with that scurrilous rabble!
 

Glenshane4

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Sep 5, 2012
Messages
9,628
Which is as it should be. Why should the State subsidize private industry.
The State should pay an equal amount in respect of each and every child - regardless of the school chosen by the parents of each child. That concept is called "equality".
 

Barroso

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Joined
Oct 1, 2011
Messages
3,780
Quote Originally Posted by Goa Tse View Post
Ghastly, simply ghastly. How are Fuinneog, Sadbh, Leithreas and Fionn going to cope in the public school system?
I think all those names mentioned above are already happily ensconced in a Gael Scoil which is state funded but without too many "ríff agus ráff."
OFF TOPIC
That said, you're obviously not talking about the gaelscoil my kids went to, full of calebs. darrens, chloes and megans.

The leithreas was usually overflowing, and the fuinneoga ensured much of the weather outside came in, the boiler didn't work properly and every so often the school was invaded by an acrid smoke. Dreadful place - physically - but great dedication shown by the staff.
Maybe when Ruairi Quinn's grandson is minister of education he will see fit to upgrade the school.


To get back on topic, what is special about the school in the OP?
Now, I said about the SCHOOL not about the Pops and Moms who send the kids there.
In other words, is there any justification for this school's existence other to keep the lower oders out?
 

realistic1

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Jun 27, 2008
Messages
11,476
The State should pay an equal amount in respect of each and every child - regardless of the school chosen by the parents of each child. That concept is called "equality".
How could the above be "equality" as the State payment would gives a massive advantage to people of affluence.
 

Fides

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Joined
Apr 6, 2010
Messages
4,442
OFF TOPIC
That said, you're obviously not talking about the gaelscoil my kids went to, full of calebs. darrens, chloes and megans.

The leithreas was usually overflowing, and the fuinneoga ensured much of the weather outside came in, the boiler didn't work properly and every so often the school was invaded by an acrid smoke. Dreadful place - physically - but great dedication shown by the staff.
Maybe when Ruairi Quinn's grandson is minister of education he will see fit to upgrade the school.


To get back on topic, what is special about the school in the OP?
Now, I said about the SCHOOL not about the Pops and Moms who send the kids there.
In other words, is there any justification for this school's existence other to keep the lower oders out?
There are many things people pay for to avoid the "lower orders" not just education. The main one is the price of the house where you live, the more you pay the less chance you have of meeting or mixing with people you'd prefer not to. But also how much you pay for holidays or where you go to socialise, which clubs you pay to join.

In terms of education unfortunately there are children who's parents care not a whit about education or whether their children are highly disruptive and as a result hinder the education of other children. The state system appears to be powerless to deal with them. As a parent I was quite happy to pay to improve my children's educational chances and avoid these disruptive children.

The school in the OP was effectively a business, it didn't have enough customers for its product or it's product wasn't up to scratch so it closes.
 

inthemire

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Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
608
Id be all for children of every level recieving the same capitation grant from the Dept of Education, and parents choosing to spend their after tax income on their childrens education, as opposed to say, drinking their after tax income in a pub for a number of nights each week. It's called choice.

However, if were going to have equality, can the same protests not be used to remove the special and unfair Deis school grants which many public schools receive all over the country in "Disadvantaged" areas?

Also,why is it that Deis school students receive additional points when applying for certain colleges/courses at Leaving Cert level?
 

mr. jings

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Joined
Mar 31, 2008
Messages
8,095
Private school fails due to market forces. Them's the breaks folks...
 

Kevin Doyle

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Joined
Jan 9, 2007
Messages
11,067
Property may be privately owned but the salaries are paid, a curriculum from the state is implemented, inspections are held, teachers must be recognised primary teachers to be employed in a permanent capacity, DES circulars must be followed and capitation grants are received. In the case of St Philomena's the property is privately owned but all the other factors do not apply.
So this school didn't apply the state curriculum?
 

Fides

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Joined
Apr 6, 2010
Messages
4,442
So this school didn't apply the state curriculum?
Given it was private and received no state funding that would be fair enough. Can't have it both ways surely. If it wanted to for example follow the British system and do A levels why not?
 

stakerwallace

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Joined
Feb 27, 2011
Messages
13,434
OFF TOPIC
That said, you're obviously not talking about the gaelscoil my kids went to, full of calebs. darrens, chloes and megans.

The leithreas was usually overflowing, and the fuinneoga ensured much of the weather outside came in, the boiler didn't work properly and every so often the school was invaded by an acrid smoke. Dreadful place - physically - but great dedication shown by the staff.
Maybe when Ruairi Quinn's grandson is minister of education he will see fit to upgrade the school.


To get back on topic, what is special about the school in the OP?
Now, I said about the SCHOOL not about the Pops and Moms who send the kids there.
In other words, is there any justification for this school's existence other to keep the lower oders out?
Rumour has it that the principal Gaelscoil in Limerick may be offered the old ESB building on the newly refurbished Honan Quay side of the river.
 

anationoceagain

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Joined
Apr 18, 2011
Messages
2,754
There are many things people pay for to avoid the "lower orders" not just education. The main one is the price of the house where you live, the more you pay the less chance you have of meeting or mixing with people you'd prefer not to. But also how much you pay for holidays or where you go to socialise, which clubs you pay to join.

In terms of education unfortunately there are children who's parents care not a whit about education or whether their children are highly disruptive and as a result hinder the education of other children. The state system appears to be powerless to deal with them. As a parent I was quite happy to pay to improve my children's educational chances and avoid these disruptive children.

The school in the OP was effectively a business, it didn't have enough customers for its product or it's product wasn't up to scratch so it closes.
You can't comment on the supposed inadequacies of the state system if your kids were sent elsewhere. In many cases state schools do fantastic work with marginalised kids-without disrupting the main school body.
 

anationoceagain

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 18, 2011
Messages
2,754
Id be all for children of every level recieving the same capitation grant from the Dept of Education, and parents choosing to spend their after tax income on their childrens education, as opposed to say, drinking their after tax income in a pub for a number of nights each week. It's called choice.

However, if were going to have equality, can the same protests not be used to remove the special and unfair Deis school grants which many public schools receive all over the country in "Disadvantaged" areas?

Also,why is it that Deis school students receive additional points when applying for certain colleges/courses at Leaving Cert level?
Part of the logic for receiving such grants is that such schools take a disproportionate amount of marginalised kids etc. that many fee paying schools wouldn't touch with a bargepole.
 
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