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1916 Seachtar na Cásca


goatstoe

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TG4 7 part series "1916 Seachtar na Cásca" started tonight. The series tells the stories behind the 7 signatories of the Proclamation. The first programme covered Thomas J. Clarke's contribution. An excellent production, the dramatic reconstructions reminded me of Ken Loach's "The Wind that Shakes the Barley". It'll be up on the TG4 player soon for those who missed it. TG4 surpassed themselves with this one, definitely worth watching.

TG4 - Irish language television channel - Teilifis Gaeilge - Home Page
 


DuineEile

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Scannán sar-maith. Bhain mé an-sult as.

Great film.

D
 

goatstoe

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I thought the insights in relation to Eoin MacNeill's attempts to call off the Rising was fascinating. Bulmer Hobson was also an interesting character that heretofore I didn't know much about. These men played their part in the story of the Easter Rising and the TG4 documentary skillfully contextualised the events at the time.
 

Cruimh

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I thought the insights in relation to Eoin MacNeill's attempts to call off the Rising was fascinating. Bulmer Hobson was also an interesting character that heretofore I didn't know much about. These men played their part in the story of the Easter Rising and the TG4 documentary skillfully contextualised the events at the time.
Read Marnie Hay's book about him not long ago - one of those fascinating Quakers that have been so influential in history.
 

goatstoe

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Read Marnie Hay's book about him not long ago - one of those fascinating Quakers that have been so influential in history.

Will read that. This programme concentrated mainly on Clarke, without who's commitment and dedication I dare say, the catalyst of the Easter Rising may not have occurred at all.
 
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cb1979

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I thought the insights in relation to Eoin MacNeill's attempts to call off the Rising was fascinating. Bulmer Hobson was also an interesting character that heretofore I didn't know much about. These men played their part in the story of the Easter Rising and the TG4 documentary skillfully contextualised the events at the time.
I've yet to read Hay's book but I also thought it was curious why MacNeill was welcomed back into the centre of seperatist life after the Rising yet Hobson was cast out into the wilderness.
 

goatstoe

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I've yet to read Hay's book but I also thought it was curious why MacNeill was welcomed back into the centre of seperatist life after the Rising yet Hobson was cast out into the wilderness.
Hobson took up a civil servant role, but was not involved in public life after the foundation of the state. MacNeill lost his Dail seat in 1927, and spent most of his time in academic work thereafter.
 

goatstoe

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Tom Clarke's American citizenship is an inconvenient fact for many who beileve de Valera escaped execution because of his New York birth.

That's an interesting point that has never been highlighted.
 

cb1979

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Hobson took up a civil servant role, but was not involved in public life after the foundation of the state. MacNeill lost his Dail seat in 1927, and spent most of his time in academic work, thereafter.
I was thinking more so of Hobson being turned away from the reformed volunteers conference in 1917, a gross insult considering his years of tireless work building up the IRB and the Fianna and his work with the pre Rising volunteers.

If it was because he didn't support the Rising and thought it ill timed surely MacNeill should have been similarly ostracised considering his countermanding order did arguably far more damage to the volunteers during Easter Week. Yet MacNeill was given huge support by people like de Valera and Griffith during the reformation of Sinn Féin.
 

goatstoe

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Clarke was however British Born - the Isle of Wight - and it might also be linked to the fact that Clarke was one of the first to be executed ?
Connolly was Scottish, but sure weren't they all technically British born at the time? Wasn't that what it was all about in parts anyway? As regards Dev, some American academic recently wrote a book describing him as a British spy, not sure about that one though.
 

Cruimh

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Connolly was Scottish, but sure weren't they all technically British born at the time? Wasn't that what it was all about in parts anyway? As regards Dev, some American academic recently wrote a book describing him as a British spy, not sure about that one though.
What I was getting at was that Clarke was different from de Valera in that Clarke was British Born whereas de Valera was US born. Also, though I'm guessing here, there was more time to organise on de Valera's behalf whereas Clarke was the second execution.
 

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