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2FM as Gaeilge




DJP

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From Peadar Toibín's opening speech in the Dáil yesterday on Questions on Education to Ciarán Cannon! (See 4th paraghraph)

"The development of the gaelscoileanna sector has been one of the few positives in terms of the Irish language, even though we usually hear negative stories about the Irish language. Some 30,000 children attend gaelscoileanna, representing approximately 5% of the child population. According to a Foras na Gaeilge study, approximately 25% of parents would send their children to gaelscoileanna were any available to them. This is a significant issue. According to the English language media in particular, Irish is being forced on kids and parents. In reality, parents and children want more Irish language education. The Government is failing them and has previously stopped them receiving that education.

Many in the Irish language sector are struggling on a daily basis. They believe that, at best, the Government is oblivious to the Irish language as an issue or, at worst, is against the language and is rolling it back. Prior to the election, Fine Gael wanted to get rid of the Irish language as a core leaving certificate subject. Recently, Young Fine Gael repeated that call.

The Government does not seem to understand that this is an important issue. Given the research on the subject in recent years, there is a strong understanding that Irish as a spoken language has 15 or 16 years left. A couple of years ago there was an advertising campaign that read: “Ná lig dúinn a bheith inár nglúin dheireanach.” Do not let this be the last generation of spoken Irish. The link could be broken.

The Government has a raft of opportunities. For example, there are a number of voluntary Irish language radio stations, but they have limited licences that prevent them from being professional and limit their geographical output. This situation could be changed. A number of mobile telephone licences are coming up for renewal. That the companies should provide customer service, Internet and billing services in the Irish language could be built into their new licences to provide for the 100,000 Irish speakers in line with their language rights. That would not cost the State anything.

The Government has a critical opportunity to allow 25% of schools to become gaelscoileanna in the context of the ongoing review of school patronage. This would allow approximately 150,000 children to voluntarily attend 700 gaelscoileanna, with a further 40,000 willing students pursuing secondary education lán-Gaelach. Such a reform would have a radical impact on the development and viability of the Irish language. I would like to hear the Government’s plans for allowing this to happen."
 
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Tweek

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There isn't FM frequency for another national station of any description. I also doubt there is any chance that if there was, they'd licence it for a niche interest that already has a national station. The next logical step would be a national commercial youth station seeing as 2FM is not a youth station anymore.
 

DJP

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There isn't FM frequency for another national station of any description. I also doubt there is any chance that if there was, they'd licence it for a niche interest that already has a national station. The next logical step would be a national commercial youth station seeing as 2FM is not a youth station anymore.
Young to me is anyone under 40 and I would have thought that 2FM does a good job catering for people of this age! No?

I think there is space on the FM dial although in the Greater Dublin Area there wouldn't be much.
 

Cato

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I have no problem with companies being encouraged to use Irish or provide services through the language. In a better fiscal environment, I would even by willing to tolerate the state grant aiding companies to create such services (but not to fund them in the long-term). However, I am opposed to companies being forced to use Irish or to provide services through it.

Nothing like 25% of schools are going to have their patronage transferred. Quinn might have thrown out that 50% figure, but the RCC has no intention of coming anywhere close to that. Outside of Dublin and some other large urban areas, very few schools will have their patronage voluntarily handed over by the RCC.
 

Warren Poynt

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Darren, as you know there is a huge, positive disposition on the part of many people in Ireland towards the Irish language. I count myself among them.

While I am very open towards your suggestion that the language receive more exposure to young people, I am not so sure that setting up a separate radio station to broadcast pop 'as Gaeilge' is the answer. In my view, it would divide and separate Irish young people away from the 'mainstream' 2FM.

Far better if the jocks on 2FM were to speak the odd or 'cupla focil as Gaeilge' to their young listeners, showing them that it is 'cool' to be bilingual and to speak Irish even if it is 'Gaeilge briste'.

Pat Kenny lapses, if that's the correct word, into the Irish language occasionally and sometimes even into French. Even Joe Duffy and Ronan Collins have the odd word in Irish.

Would it be too much to hope that John Murray and Ryan tubridy might do the same ?

I'm not surprised that FIVE times as many Irish parents would send their children to Gaelscoileannna if only there were places available for them. Sign of the times.

In my view, it is the cities of Ireland - not the Gaeltachtai - who hold the key to a revival of the language.
 

Tweek

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Young to me is anyone under 40 and I would have thought that 2FM does a good job catering for people of this age! No?

I think there is space on the FM dial although in the Greater Dublin Area there wouldn't be much.
Young in radio terms is 15-30, 2FM does not serve this area well.

There is no space in the entire midlands/north east due to the area being flat and densely stationed as it is. A service covering the South/West would be possible (NW has the border which reduces availability again) in frequency terms and would serve most of its core constituency - but likely do nothing to serve what I imagine are the real aims, namely in getting more people outside of Gaeltachts to speak Irish.
 
G

Gimpanzee

Far better if the jocks on 2FM were to speak the odd or 'cupla focil as Gaeilge' to their young listeners, showing them that it is 'cool' to be bilingual and to speak Irish even if it is 'Gaeilge briste'.
You do know that the young peoples can smell this sort of fraudery from a gazillion miles? There is nothing more uncool. Nothing.
 

Tweek

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Far better if the jocks on 2FM were to speak the odd or 'cupla focil as Gaeilge' to their young listeners, showing them that it is 'cool' to be bilingual and to speak Irish even if it is 'Gaeilge briste'.
2FM doesn't have "young listeners" and hasn't had for some time. Tubridy, Hayes, Gogan all appeal to the 30+ audience. The specialist shows have a younger, but much much smaller, audience.

The IRRs - Spin South West, iRadio NW/NE and Beat - all have a number of actually bilingual shows. iRadio's was moved to a lower audience time because it was losing them listeners however theirs is still daily.

iRadio
Beat 102-103 : DJs and Shows
Pop Raidió | SPIN South West - The Most Music Station - New Music, Top 30, Movies, Entertainment, Listen Live

There may be more.
 

Riadach

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Young in radio terms is 15-30, 2FM does not serve this area well.

There is no space in the entire midlands/north east due to the area being flat and densely stationed as it is. A service covering the South/West would be possible (NW has the border which reduces availability again) in frequency terms and would serve most of its core constituency - but likely do nothing to serve what I imagine are the real aims, namely in getting more people outside of Gaeltachts to speak Irish.
Not at all. Appealing to young people within the Gaeltacht would be the greatest benefit.
 

Tweek

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Not at all. Appealing to young people within the Gaeltacht would be the greatest benefit.
Seeing as RnaG's youth shows were pulled due to, yet again, a lack of listeners; I think that battle has been lost.

Additionally, I doubt that pushing further resources in to the language in a soon to be reduced even further tiny area is going to have any impact on "saving" it. 10,000 people who are only able to speak to those 10,000 people and perform most of their daily communications in English (or the hybrid half and half that I hear in places like Carraroe) aren't keeping something alive, they're keeping it on life support.
 

Bridget558

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Is that what happened to Rnags late night youth shows? I noticed they were no longer on. I thought rnag didn't measure ratings.
 

Tweek

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Is that what happened to Rnags late night youth shows? I noticed they were no longer on. I thought rnag didn't measure ratings.
They don't partake in the JNLR, officially as they don't carry much (any?) advertising but they would know from other surveys what kind of listenership they're getting.

Its long been suspected they don't partake in the JNLR as the figures would be an embarrassment.
 

RepublicOfLuas

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If there were enough artists/bands recording their vocals in Irish as well as English, then this would be a positive step. A pop/contemporary music station with Irish-speaking presenters, adverts etc, playing not only English language pop/rock, but also stuff from the Ceol series of music.
I'm in the process of recording an album and the vocals are being done in both English and Irish. Many Scandinavian bands, Kent for example, record in both languages. The sales for both CDs count as one unit, so chart performance won't be deceptive.
 

Tweek

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If there were enough artists/bands recording their vocals in Irish as well as English, then this would be a positive step. A pop/contemporary music station with Irish-speaking presenters, adverts etc, playing not only English language pop/rock, but also stuff from the Ceol series of music.
I'm in the process of recording an album and the vocals are being done in both English and Irish. Many Scandinavian bands, Kent for example, record in both languages. The sales for both CDs count as one unit, so chart performance won't be deceptive.
I'd take a guess that the amount of Irish artists being played on radio is about 0.000000001% above the minimum limit the BAI set for stations; and that mostly consists of The Script.

And Girls Aloud (one's from Derry, see), Dido (her gran's Irish), etc, are also classed as Irish for that BAI limit.

So even if every actually Irish artist recorded tracks in Irish, you might be able to make up 5% of the normal playlist.
 

RepublicOfLuas

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I'd take a guess that the amount of Irish artists being played on radio is about 0.000000001% above the minimum limit the BAI set for stations; and that mostly consists of The Script.

And Girls Aloud (one's from Derry, see), Dido (her gran's Irish), etc, are also classed as Irish for that BAI limit.

So even if every actually Irish artist recorded tracks in Irish, you might be able to make up 5% of the normal playlist.
I know Girls Aloud are counted in the quota, but Dido certainly isn't. It only applies to music created either by Irish born artists, or else music created in Ireland. Radio stations have been found to be "abusing" the rules by playing Muse, Michael Jackson etc (recorded in Co. Meath), or if the track had any Irish person involved in the production/engineering/session play.

The rules need to be re-examined.
 

Tweek

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I know Girls Aloud are counted in the quota, but Dido certainly isn't. It only applies to music created either by Irish born artists, or else music created in Ireland. Radio stations have been found to be "abusing" the rules by playing Muse, Michael Jackson etc (recorded in Co. Meath), or if the track had any Irish person involved in the production/engineering/session play.

The rules need to be re-examined.
98FM used Dido in their quota calculations in the past.
 

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