30 September 1979 - 40 years ago today Pope John Paul II tells the youth of Ireland: "Young people of Ireland, I love you"

Lumpy Talbot

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No
The French had their Vichy, all prepared to work with an invading psychology. At least that was on foot of a physical invasion.

The Rat-Church and its cult followers were so stupid they were actually collecting money for the cult involved.

Any remaining scruff of this ilk should be marched down O'Connell Street with their heads shaved.
 


Cdebru

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Watcher2

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A different world. I'd contend a better one. It was last great Ard Fheis of the Catholic Church in Ireland.

The 1970's was a tremendous mix of old Ireland and the new emerging modern Ireland. The Pope's Youth Mass in Ballybrit, some of which I watched on TV was an Irish version of Woodstock, just without the guitars and the sin.

As a nine year old, I was at the Pope's Mass in the field at Knock, standing beside an eleven year old Rory O'Neill aka Dr. Panti Bliss, who was twirling around like a girl and telling me how he liked to wear his mother's high heel shoes! I kid you not.

So Ireland's past, present and future was there that day.
Has Rory ever lead an organisation that facilitated and covered up heinous crimes against young boys?

I'm no fan of the bauld Panti, just asking the question.
 

drjimryan2

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any good he did is cancelled out by his support for paedophiles, by refusing to release the files.........
 

General Urko

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The most accurate cinematic depiction of Ireland in the 70s & 80s was Deliverance!
 

stray creditor

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Has Rory ever lead an organisation that facilitated and covered up heinous crimes against young boys?

I'm no fan of the bauld Panti, just asking the question.
A pointless rhetorical question. The answer is of course...No.

The Rory story is an anecdote from the day.
 

Catahualpa

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Drinking on good Friday, using contraception, getting a divorce, being gay, all illegal back then.

But I think we hit on the core point. Nobody stopped YOU doing your thing, so stuff the rest. Unlike Catholic men to be selfish.
OK I admit no Drink on Good Friday was a bit of a Killer...:(

ADD Contraception was Legal in 1979
 

Half Nelson

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I take it you were not around at the time?

Nobody stopped me doing anything I wanted to do back then

- and nobody tried to!
The younger generations have swallowed the political and media spin - hook line and sinker. They remind me of the diehard loyalists at the end of the 20thC who believed there was a priest under every bush south of the Border.
Ignorance is the foundation of oppression.
 

Half Nelson

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You think speech was more free in the 80s than today?

You will have to expand on that.
It was definitely more free in the ways that mattered. There wasn't the homogenous media and political mindset that gives us one point of view and one only on Brexit, on Trump, on Housing, on Abortion, on the Economy, on the EU..etc, etc.

Most of us can easily predict the spin from RTE, The IT, The Indo, etc. on almost any topic you care to mention. It's the reason nobody gives a fig or will hardly notice if these media organs sink without trace

Where's the free speech in that?
 

Buchaill Dana

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It was definitely more free in the ways that mattered. There wasn't the homogenous media and political mindset that gives us one point of view and one only on Brexit, on Trump, on Housing, on Abortion, on the Economy, on the EU..etc, etc.

Most of us can easily predict the spin from RTE, The IT, The Indo, etc. on almost any topic you care to mention. It's the reason nobody gives a fig or will hardly notice if these media organs sink without trace

Where's the free speech in that?
You clearly weren't around in the 80s. Or today come to think of it. Absolute shite.
 

Buchaill Dana

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The younger generations have swallowed the political and media spin - hook line and sinker. They remind me of the diehard loyalists at the end of the 20thC who believed there was a priest under every bush south of the Border.
Ignorance is the foundation of oppression.
There is so much wrong with this I don't know where to start
 

puffin

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The younger generations have swallowed the political and media spin - hook line and sinker. They remind me of the diehard loyalists at the end of the 20thC who believed there was a priest under every bush south of the Border.
Ignorance is the foundation of oppression.
The priests never left the RTE radio studios, I remember a whole show about shaking hands after Mass ffs.
 

Emily Davison

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30 September 1979: Pope John Paul began the second day of his tour with a short visit to the ancient monastery at Clonmacnoise in County Offaly. With 20,000 in attendance, he spoke of how the ruins were "still charged with a great mission".Later that morning he celebrated a Youth Mass for 300,000 at Ballybrit Racecourse in Galway. It was here that the Pope uttered perhaps the most memorable line of his visit: "Young people of Ireland, I love you"

Pope John Paul II had begun his visit to Ireland on the previous day. Ireland was the third pilgrimage of his Pontificate. The Holy Father's first visit was to the Dominican Republic, Mexico and the Bahamas, his second visit was to Poland and his third visit was to Ireland and the United States.

During his 1979 pilgrimage to Ireland, Pope John Paul undertook a hectic schedule travelling the country in order to greet the faithful in the four provinces of Ireland. Over the three days the Holy Father addressed large crowds in Dublin, Drogheda, Clonmacnoise, Galway, Knock, Maynooth and Limerick.k

On that first day, September 29th, in the Phoenix Park, he had met over one million people, the largest gathering of Irish people in history. He told the people why he felt called to visit Ireland and the Irish. He reminded them how St Patrick heard the “voice of the Irish” and came back to Ireland.

The final day of the visit - I October 1979 - began with a brief early morning visit to St Patrick's College, Maynooth, the National Seminary, in County Kildare.

Some 80,000 people joined 1,000 seminarians on the grounds of the college for the brief visit. A dense fog delayed the Pope's arrival from Dublin by helicopter. The final Mass of the Pope's visit to Ireland was celebrated at Greenpark Racecourse in Limerick before 400,000 people, many more than had been expected.

By any standards the Papal visit had been a huge success. The numbers attending the various gatherings far exceeded what was expected. Pope John Paul had been an actor in his youth and he could keep an audience enthralled. With the benefit of 40 years hindsight it can be seen as the apogee of the popularity of the Papacy with the bulk of the Irish People. No longer was the Pontiff a remote and distant figure in Rome but a living human being come amongst the Faithful of Ireland.
Never was there a greater lie than Young people of Ireland I love you.

A church presided over by men who failed so many children. Deliberately so. I’m glad it’s 40 years on. What a horrible Ireland it was then. But look how far we’ve come. So liberal, enlightened, so many happy young people and older people freed from the Catholic shackles of mind and body. A vastly different country since 1979. I’m so glad my children will never know what it was like to live in a Catholic Church run evil hypocrisy.
 
Last edited:

cozzy121

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OK I admit no Drink on Good Friday was a bit of a Killer...:(

ADD Contraception was Legal in 1979
VERY limited in 1979
"
In a highly controversial vote on February 20, 1985, the Irish government defies the powerful Catholic Church and approves the sale of contraceptives.
Up until 1979, Irish law prohibited the importation and sale of contraceptives. In a 1973 case, McGee v. The Attorney General, the Irish Supreme Court found that a constitutional right to marital privacy covered the use of contraceptives. Pressured by strong conservative forces in Irish society, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, the government was slow to change the law to reflect the court’s decision, and a number of proposed bills failed before reaching the books.
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In 1979, the Irish health minister, Charles Haughey, introduced a bill limiting the legal provision of contraceptives to “bona fide family planning purposes.” Signed into law in November 1980, the Health (Family Planning) Act ensured that contraceptives could be sold by a registered pharmacist to customers with a valid medical prescription. Still, many people saw the law as too strict. Over the next several years, a movement began to make contraceptives more easily available, causing bitter divisions inside and outside of the Dail, Ireland’s main house of Parliament."

 

Catahualpa

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Never was there a greater lie than Young people of Ireland I love you.

A church presided over by men who failed so many children. Deliberately so. I’m glad it’s 40 years on. What a horrible Ireland it was then. But look how far we’ve come. So liberal, enlightened, so many happy young people and older people freed from the Catholic shackles of mind and body. A vastly different country since 1979. I’m so glad my children will never know what it was like to live in a Catholic Church run evil hypocrisy.
:rolleyes:
 

Catahualpa

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VERY limited in 1979
"
In a highly controversial vote on February 20, 1985, the Irish government defies the powerful Catholic Church and approves the sale of contraceptives.
Up until 1979, Irish law prohibited the importation and sale of contraceptives. In a 1973 case, McGee v. The Attorney General, the Irish Supreme Court found that a constitutional right to marital privacy covered the use of contraceptives. Pressured by strong conservative forces in Irish society, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, the government was slow to change the law to reflect the court’s decision, and a number of proposed bills failed before reaching the books.
Thanks for watching!Visit Website
In 1979, the Irish health minister, Charles Haughey, introduced a bill limiting the legal provision of contraceptives to “bona fide family planning purposes.” Signed into law in November 1980, the Health (Family Planning) Act ensured that contraceptives could be sold by a registered pharmacist to customers with a valid medical prescription. Still, many people saw the law as too strict. Over the next several years, a movement began to make contraceptives more easily available, causing bitter divisions inside and outside of the Dail, Ireland’s main house of Parliament."

Contraceptives were legally available in this State since the 1960s.
 

cozzy121

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Contraceptives were legally available in this State since the 1960s.

"
Ban on sales 1935–1978[edit]
Owning and using contraceptive devices and pills was not prohibited. However, from 1935, it was illegal to sell or to import them.[3] During this time a loophole was used, where a device such as a condom could not be "offered for sale", but a citizen could be "invited to treat" to buy it. Also people made donations to family planning associations to obtain contraception as a "gift". The reality for almost all of the population was that contraception was unobtainable. Few outlets wanted to stock a product that could bring the attention of the police or public opprobrium.
In early 1971 Senator Mary Robinson (who would later become president) attempted to introduce the first bill proposing to liberalise the law on contraception into the Seanad, but was not allowed a reading, so it could not be discussed. On 31 March a number of supporters managed to get into the grounds of Leinster House and then broke into the building to register their protests.[4] On 22 May 1971 a group of Irish feminists including Mary Kenny travelled to Belfast by rail and made their return to Dublin Connolly, laden with contraceptive devices, into a statement on the illogicality of the law. This provoked criticism from the Roman Catholic Church in Ireland; Thomas Ryan, Bishop of Clonfert, said that "... never before, and certainly not since penal times was the Catholic heritage of Ireland subjected to so many insidious onslaughts on the pretext of conscience, civil rights and women's liberation."[5]
In 1973, the Supreme Court affirmed that there was a constitutional right to marital privacy which also allowed for the use of contraceptives; A number of bills were proposed, but all failed to make it to the statute book. Indeed, Taoiseach at the time, Jack Lynch, admitted at one point that the issue had been put "on the long finger".
Reforms allowing sales[edit]
In 1979 the Health (Family Planning) Bill was introduced by Charles Haughey. This bill limited the provision of contraceptives to bona fide "family planning or for adequate medical reasons".[6] A controversial part of the bill was that contraceptives could only be dispensed by a pharmacist on the presentation of a valid medical prescription from a practising doctor. It is often wrongly stated that the recipient of the prescription had to be married, but the legislation did not technically require such terms, however "bona fide family planning" would have made non-marital use unlikely to be authorised. The reason for this compromise was the strong position of conservative elements in Irish society at the time, particularly the Roman Catholic Church which made it difficult for the government to provide for a more liberal law. Contraception was also not seen by politicians as a vote-getter at the time. Haughey famously described the 1979 Act as "an Irish solution to an Irish problem". On 1 November 1980 the Act came into operation by order[7] of the Minister.
The Health (Family Planning) (Amendment) Act, 1985[8] liberalised the law by allowing condoms and spermicides to be sold to people over 18 without having to present a prescription; however sale was limited to categories of places named in the act. The Health (Family Planning) (Amendment) Act, 1992[9] repealed Section 4 of the 1979 act, as amended in 1985, and continued the provision of contraceptives without prescription, allowing sale to individuals over the age of 17. As of 2010, the 1992 Act and the Health (Family Planning) (Amendment) Act of 1993 are the main Irish legislation on contraceptive and family planning services".
 


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