30 years ago this week: Enniskillen



CastleRay

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As is the right thing to do.
The right thing would have been for McGuinness to have condemned this atrocity rather than just saying it was a "mistake" and provided the information required to bring the perpertrators to justice. Instead he went to his grave with his barbaric secrets whilst he and his mates demand "justice" and respect.
 

McSlaggart

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The right thing would have been for McGuinness to have condemned this atrocity rather than just saying it was a "mistake"
Do you think that British Generals do the same when it comes to their military actions?
 

Ó Ghabhainn

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The right thing would have been for McGuinness to have condemned this atrocity rather than just saying it was a "mistake" and provided the information required to bring the perpertrators to justice. Instead he went to his grave with his barbaric secrets whilst he and his mates demand "justice" and respect.
And in the process be killed and removed from the peace-building equation.

Sure.
 

CastleRay

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Do you think that British Generals do the same when it comes to their military actions?
You aren't comparing the same. Mcguinness and his IRA murder gang had no legitimacy or mandate from any significant section of the people of Ireland, north, south or combined.
 

Se0samh

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You aren't comparing the same. Mcguinness and his IRA murder gang had no legitimacy or mandate from any significant section of the people of Ireland, north, south or combined.

That could be disputed and depends on definition and timing........but it's irrelevant, British Forces committed atrocities in every military campaign they ever took part in, no too many were condemned by anyone of significance...:roll:
 

Mickeymac

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That could be disputed and depends on definition and timing........but it's irrelevant, British Forces committed atrocities in every military campaign they ever took part in, no too many were condemned by anyone of significance...:roll:

History has never been kind to them for past actions during their various occupations of other Nation's lands, anyways was disappointed to see Foster/Brokenhead (by their attendance) politicising the commemoration of those poor folk who lost their lives in Eniskillen all those years ago.

They should hang their heads in shame IMO.
 

McSlaggart

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You aren't comparing the same. Mcguinness and his IRA murder gang had no legitimacy or mandate from any significant section of the people of Ireland, north, south or combined.
Honestly you support the "poppy" and that is your line? Imperialism was the main driving force in that waste of life.
 

Mickeymac

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Honestly you support the "poppy" and that is your line? Imperialism was the main driving force in that waste of life.

These poppy fascists appear to live in the days of imperialism, conquest, colonialism, rule the waves and other such sh1t but not one has realised or spoken of the presence or significance of the USS Ronald Reagan in the South China seas.
 

Mickeymac

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Do you think that British Generals do the same when it comes to their military actions?


Haigh is worth a read sir....:D


The Commander of British forces in France during the disastrous Battle of the Somme in 1916, Haig has the distinction of overseeing the greatest single day loss of British lives in history: on the morning of July 1, 1916, 60,000 troops—20% of the entire British fighting force engaged—was killed or wounded (including all but 68 men of the 801-man strong 1
 

CastleRay

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Honestly you support the "poppy" and that is your line? Imperialism was the main driving force in that waste of life.
From a non-comparison to blatant diversion. You’re just a sectarian murder apologist with that tack.
 

McSlaggart

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From a non-comparison to blatant diversion. You’re just a sectarian murder apologist with that tack.
Bull...

what you wrote:

"The right thing would have been for McGuinness to have condemned this atrocity"...... which is not an approach that most military people take when there intended actions go astray.


On the other hand British military had strategic objectives of bombing city's....... just to kill people.
 

CastleRay

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Bull...

what you wrote:

"The right thing would have been for McGuinness to have condemned this atrocity"...... which is not an approach that most military people take when there intended actions go astray.


On the other hand British military had strategic objectives of bombing city's....... just to kill people.
There’s no other hand. You’re an apologist for blatant sectarian murder.
 

McSlaggart

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There’s no other hand. You’re an apologist for blatant sectarian murder.
I did not say on the other hand. You asked a question about Martin Mc Guinness not condemning the mission. He stated that it did not go according to the set plan. You may not like that answer but it is one consistent with people from a military background.

The dam busters action was as much about murdering the people who lived under the shadow of the dams as the factories in which they worked. Yet as a Northern Ireland fan I am sure you have sung the wee tune.
 

Mickeymac

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I did not say on the other hand. You asked a question about Martin Mc Guinness not condemning the mission. He stated that it did not go according to the set plan. You may not like that answer but it is one consistent with people from a military background.

The dam busters action was as much about murdering the people who lived under the shadow of the dams as the factories in which they worked. Yet as a Northern Ireland fan I am sure you have sung the wee tune.

His postings on here would suggest he prefers the "Billy Boys" coupled with his majesty's "anthem" which over half the people in NE Ireland do not recognise and put it down as just another orange tune..........and who could blame them for that?
 

Ó Ghabhainn

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Are you saying that that isn't the right thing to do?
By that logic, Jackson should have been turned in along with the other murderers of Bloody Sunday.

Ray, without McGuinness, April 1998 may well just have been another month of the Troubles. Taken that that phrase is inapplicable in subjective terms, objectively it wasn't just another month of the Troubles. Therefore, the absolutely right thing to do would have been a can of worms. As McSlaggart says, he was a military man (government or not). I don't deny the hurt he caused, but I believe we're in a better place for him.

I don't necessarily agree with Mickey that the attendance of Foster and Brokenshire (I wonder what his ancestors did to deserve that) politicises the event. I think representatives of Nationalism and Republicanism should have been there. Whether they would have been welcome is another matter. The right thing to do becomes complicated.
 

Mickeymac

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By that logic, Jackson should have been turned in along with the other murderers of Bloody Sunday.

Ray, without McGuinness, April 1998 may well just have been another month of the Troubles. Taken that that phrase is inapplicable in subjective terms, objectively it wasn't just another month of the Troubles. Therefore, the absolutely right thing to do would have been a can of worms. As McSlaggart says, he was a military man (government or not). I don't deny the hurt he caused, but I believe we're in a better place for him.

I don't necessarily agree with Mickey that the attendance of Foster and Brokenshire (I wonder what his ancestors did to deserve that) politicises the event. I think representatives of Nationalism and Republicanism should have been there. Whether they would have been welcome is another matter. The right thing to do becomes complicated.


The right thing to do is very pertinent in this case, if Foster and Brokendown were to have attended the Bloody Sunday commemorations or the McGurks bar massacre as well as the Enniskillen event, that to me would have came across as fair and balanced in such a deeply divided society, tell me.......do you honestly think they did not politicise their attendance by showing up at Enniskillen and neither Any of the other commemorations of innocent civilians murdered by Their State Forces?
 

Ó Ghabhainn

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The right thing to do is very pertinent in this case, if Foster and Brokendown were to have attended the Bloody Sunday commemorations or the McGurks bar massacre as well as the Enniskillen event, that to me would have came across as fair and balanced in such a deeply divided society, tell me.......do you honestly think they did not politicise their attendance by showing up at Enniskillen and neither Any of the other commemorations of innocent civilians murdered by Their State Forces?
I think all representatives should attend all of these commemorations. I think that's the way forward.

I think they are more wrong not to attend commemorations for victims of "their forces" than they are to attend those for victims belonging to their specific community. However, the more valuable commemorations (of victims of their forces) may not be welcome within those communities.

[Highlighting for emphasis]
 


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