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3D printing just wont go away and just might end world hunger


Pat Gill

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Nasa have just given a company $125,000 to produce a prototype food printer in 6 months.

Anjan Contractor’s 3D food printer might evoke visions of the “replicator” popularized in Star Trek, from which Captain Picard was constantly interrupting himself to order tea. And indeed Contractor’s company, Systems & Materials Research Corporation, just got a six month, $125,000 grant from NASA to create a prototype of his universal food synthesizer.

But Contractor, a mechanical engineer with a background in 3D printing, envisions a much more mundane—and ultimately more important—use for the technology. He sees a day when every kitchen has a 3D printer, and the earth’s 12 billion people feed themselves customized, nutritionally-appropriate meals synthesized one layer at a time, from cartridges of powder and oils they buy at the corner grocery store.
But its the possible ingredients for the food inks which drew my attention,
In TNO’s vision of a future of 3D printed meals, “alternative ingredients” for food include:

  • algae
  • duckweed
  • grass
  • lupine seeds
  • beet leafs
  • insects
From astronauts to emerging markets

While Contractor and his team are initially focusing on applications for long-distance space travel, his eventual goal is to turn his system for 3D printing food into a design that can be licensed to someone who wants to turn it into a business.......................................

The audacious plan to end hunger with 3-D printed food – Quartz
 

storybud1

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photosynthesis is simply amazing, converting free energy into mass (okay some nutrients are needed) but as you get older you really understand food as a fuel for your engine.Anything that is full of artificial preservatives is just rubbish really, just look at some of the breakfast cereals, the flippin cardboard they come in is better than the contents.

Farmers should be getting in on the internet and offering food online, need spuds? come to my field next Tuesday and pick up 3 bags (25kg) for a fiver each. The IFA should have a grab one type platform. Book your food when the farmer is picking and just turn up.

This would encourage farmers to get away from the rip off model imposed by the supermarkets as they could plant 3 or 4 crops in one field and only pick what is needed.I am sure there is many different models for efficiency but cutting out the middlemen always makes sense.

North Dublin is the best place in Ireland for veg, it is a shame nobody is bringing the farmers and the public together instead of these stupid allotments, it makes me cringe when I think of the waste in having allotments. petrol, seed,rent, tools,time,fertilizer, etc when a professional like a farmer can do it for a fraction of the price.
 
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tipp revolution

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Allotments fill a certain need I wouldn't discount them completely ( sometimes I think this site is full of accountants!)
 

Alan Alda

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North Dublin is the best place in Ireland for veg, it is a shame nobody is bringing the farmers and the public together instead of these stupid allotments, it makes me cringe when I think of the waste in having allotments. petrol, seed,rent, tools,time,fertilizer, etc when a professional like a farmer can do it for a fraction of the price.
Allotments are one of the few means of bringing the rural , farmer , professional together with the city enthusiast.
Its not a waste to give townies a taste of horticulture. Horticulturally educated townies will be more inclined to engage directly with the producer and avoid supermarkets.
 

Peppermint

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Well I was feeling a tad peckish so went and printed myself a nice bacon sarnie......
Very chewy result.............
 

CarnivalOfAction

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Nasa have just given a company $125,000 to produce a prototype food printer in 6 months.



But its the possible ingredients for the food inks which drew my attention,
The fleggers will never eat that:

 

storybud1

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Allotments are one of the few means of bringing the rural , farmer , professional together with the city enthusiast.
Its not a waste to give townies a taste of horticulture. Horticulturally educated townies will be more inclined to engage directly with the producer and avoid supermarkets.
having worked on farms since I was a kid I can tell you allotments are a joke, vegetable farming is tough hard work that would probably likely kill most allotment holders in a week if they had to do it.

A good farmer can grow vegetables for a fraction of the cost of allotments, it is simple: I want good food as cheap as possible, just consider the costs of allotments as opposed to engaging with a farmer? it is a no brainer.

The allotment holders can still waste petrol,seed,time,fertilizer,tools,sheds,etc or engage with a farmer to buy his produce at a fraction of the price it would cost them to do. Just add it up and farmers can give you a bag of spuds for 3 or 4 quid compared to the 10 or 15 quid it will cost you.
 

Ren84

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having worked on farms since I was a kid I can tell you allotments are a joke, vegetable farming is tough hard work that would probably likely kill most allotment holders in a week if they had to do it.

A good farmer can grow vegetables for a fraction of the cost of allotments, it is simple: I want good food as cheap as possible, just consider the costs of allotments as opposed to engaging with a farmer? it is a no brainer.

The allotment holders can still waste petrol,seed,time,fertilizer,tools,sheds,etc or engage with a farmer to buy his produce at a fraction of the price it would cost them to do. Just add it up and farmers can give you a bag of spuds for 3 or 4 quid compared to the 10 or 15 quid it will cost you.
Economies of scale alone would kill off allotments being a replacement, or at the very least, supplement to modern agriculture.
 

Alan Alda

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having worked on farms since I was a kid I can tell you allotments are a joke, vegetable farming is tough hard work that would probably likely kill most allotment holders in a week if they had to do it.

A good farmer can grow vegetables for a fraction of the cost of allotments, it is simple: I want good food as cheap as possible, just consider the costs of allotments as opposed to engaging with a farmer? it is a no brainer.

The allotment holders can still waste petrol,seed,time,fertilizer,tools,sheds,etc or engage with a farmer to buy his produce at a fraction of the price it would cost them to do. Just add it up and farmers can give you a bag of spuds for 3 or 4 quid compared to the 10 or 15 quid it will cost you.
Its not all about the costs though. Allotments are a 'lifestyle choice' nowadays. True ,its a bit tokenistic but the 'movement's heart is in the right place. Ripe for the plucking by shrewd farmers.Not something to be dismissed. Allotment culture and amateur horticulturalists give a lot of cash to farmers markets.
Also , since the farmer probably wont do deliveries, petrol to the farm will probably cost the buyer more than petrol to the allotment ,so its not quite the bargain you suggest.
 
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F

fistikuffs

having worked on farms since I was a kid I can tell you allotments are a joke, vegetable farming is tough hard work that would probably likely kill most allotment holders in a week if they had to do it.

A good farmer can grow vegetables for a fraction of the cost of allotments, it is simple: I want good food as cheap as possible, just consider the costs of allotments as opposed to engaging with a farmer? it is a no brainer.

The allotment holders can still waste petrol,seed,time,fertilizer,tools,sheds,etc or engage with a farmer to buy his produce at a fraction of the price it would cost them to do. Just add it up and farmers can give you a bag of spuds for 3 or 4 quid compared to the 10 or 15 quid it will cost you.
I suppose one of the advantages of allotments is that the grower can try to grow different varieties of veg, varieties that farmers would never consider growing due to low yield/returns etc. Also allotments are great for getting "townies" to get their hands dirty and learn a little about how food is produced. Most of the costs you mention can be mitigated to a good extent if proper planning was put into allotments.

They aren't any replacement for farming but they do have their own value i feel.
 

LamportsEdge

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photosynthesis is simply amazing, converting free energy into mass (okay some nutrients are needed) but as you get older you really understand food as a fuel for your engine.Anything that is full of artificial preservatives is just rubbish really, just look at some of the breakfast cereals, the flippin cardboard they come in is better than the contents.

Farmers should be getting in on the internet and offering food online, need spuds? come to my field next Tuesday and pick up 3 bags (25kg) for a fiver each. The IFA should have a grab one type platform. Book your food when the farmer is picking and just turn up.

This would encourage farmers to get away from the rip off model imposed by the supermarkets as they could plant 3 or 4 crops in one field and only pick what is needed.I am sure there is many different models for efficiency but cutting out the middlemen always makes sense.

North Dublin is the best place in Ireland for veg, it is a shame nobody is bringing the farmers and the public together instead of these stupid allotments, it makes me cringe when I think of the waste in having allotments. petrol, seed,rent, tools,time,fertilizer, etc when a professional like a farmer can do it for a fraction of the price.
Peer-to-peer business is the coming thing. Nothing to stop any farmer or customer contacting each other or putting a note in the paper saying 'let's deal direct'.

Disruption of existing supply systems is a valid business plan.
 

CarnivalOfAction

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Even inorganic 3D printers have problems:

3D printers have a dirty secret | SmartPlanet

"Before you buy that amazing desktop 3D printer, know this: that mini-factory-in-a-box could be harmful to your health.

Researchers from the Illinois Institute of Technology have found, for the first time, that commercially available desktop 3D printers — which are now cheaper and easier than ever to purchase for your home or office — are “high emitters” of ultrafine particles."
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Oct 31, 2010
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Nasa have just given a company $125,000 to produce a prototype food printer in 6 months.



But its the possible ingredients for the food inks which drew my attention,
While it is probably a long way off science once again confounds Malthus theory of overpopulation. Global agricultural estimates currently are for a maximum population of 12 billion, with this that could easily be multiplied again.

Of course a few things need to be overcome for it to take off in the short to medium such as taste and repulsion to eating insect protein. But it does make sense in that proteins, carbohydrates, and fats can be found in many plant types and are currently inefficiently used in the food chain.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Allotments are one of the few means of bringing the rural , farmer , professional together with the city enthusiast.
Its not a waste to give townies a taste of horticulture. Horticulturally educated townies will be more inclined to engage directly with the producer and avoid supermarkets.
They are not profit yielding though, but to each their own enjoyment and hobbies.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Peer-to-peer business is the coming thing. Nothing to stop any farmer or customer contacting each other or putting a note in the paper saying 'let's deal direct'.

Disruption of existing supply systems is a valid business plan.
P2P is already growing with a lot of old world middlemen starting to be cut out. As you use the example of farmers above the site Done Deal for cattle sales and second hand machinery sales are cutting out garages and marts in a substantial manner.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Oct 31, 2010
Messages
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photosynthesis is simply amazing, converting free energy into mass (okay some nutrients are needed) but as you get older you really understand food as a fuel for your engine.Anything that is full of artificial preservatives is just rubbish really, just look at some of the breakfast cereals, the flippin cardboard they come in is better than the contents.

Farmers should be getting in on the internet and offering food online, need spuds? come to my field next Tuesday and pick up 3 bags (25kg) for a fiver each. The IFA should have a grab one type platform. Book your food when the farmer is picking and just turn up.

This would encourage farmers to get away from the rip off model imposed by the supermarkets as they could plant 3 or 4 crops in one field and only pick what is needed.I am sure there is many different models for efficiency but cutting out the middlemen always makes sense.

North Dublin is the best place in Ireland for veg, it is a shame nobody is bringing the farmers and the public together instead of these stupid allotments, it makes me cringe when I think of the waste in having allotments. petrol, seed,rent, tools,time,fertilizer, etc when a professional like a farmer can do it for a fraction of the price.
The problem with this is that people always come back to vegetable growing. The real profit in a climate like Ireland's is beef and dairy. In addition with our high labour costs growing is a high cost business that our minimum wage levels make very uncompetitive.

You also have to remember that distribution channels are essential with different soil types and climate (yes even within parts of Ireland) dictating that many farmers growing the same crop are clumped together in different locations making national distribution as opposed to local essential.
 

EUrJokingMeRight

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Sep 28, 2009
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The problem with this is that people always come back to vegetable growing. The real profit in a climate like Ireland's is beef and dairy. In addition with our high labour costs growing is a high cost business that our minimum wage levels make very uncompetitive.

You also have to remember that distribution channels are essential with different soil types and climate (yes even within parts of Ireland) dictating that many farmers growing the same crop are clumped together in different locations making national distribution as opposed to local essential.
Well the fact is that you have not needed soil to grow veg for many years now. On a commercial scale perhaps, but anybody, even someone living in an apartment, can grow many of their own vegetables without the need for soil, land or many other conventional requirements of the past.
As for those with allotments, they can grow enough veg to feed ten families year round if they do it the right way. The conventional way of farming is changing and the fact is that an unused urban concrete car park can produce more veg than the same size of land in the most fertile part of the world, if it is approached correctly, using modern production techniques.

Quite amazing really. So I do see more and more families becoming a lot more self sufficient for many veg irrespective of where they live, in the future.
 
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