50 years since the Battle of the Bogside

cozzy121

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I Heard a brief piece on Morning Ireland regarding an important piece of Histroy of this Island


"
British troops deployed into Northern Ireland for the first time 50 years ago after days of rioting in Derry's Bogside, which later spread to Belfast and beyond.

Initially planned as a limited intervention to restore order, Operation Banner would last 38 years and become Britain's longest continuous campaign.

Catholic anger over discrimination in voting, housing and jobs first exploded into riots in Derry, Northern Ireland's only Catholic majority city, in October 1968.

Tension boiled over again on 12 August, 1969, when stone-throwing Catholics protested an annual Apprentice Boys march that skirted the Bogside.

For three days there were ferocious clashes between police, backed by militant Protestants, and mainly young Catholics."



Excellent article here


"
The August 1969 Battle of the Bogside was a three-day riot in the city which saw the people of the Bogside area erect barricades to prevent the RUC entering.

The violence ultimately led to the deployment of British troops on the streets, a decision that was initially welcomed by many of those in the area.

It saw the Irish government respond by promising aid to the Bogsiders but stopping short of providing any kind of military support. Instead Taoiseach Jack Lynch decided on erecting field hospitals for the injured in several areas along the border.

The Battle of the Bogside is not considered the start of the Troubles in Northern Ireland but the events were certainly an escalation that had a major effect on what followed. "
 


Mickeymac

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I Heard a brief piece on Morning Ireland regarding an important piece of Histroy of this Island


"
British troops deployed into Northern Ireland for the first time 50 years ago after days of rioting in Derry's Bogside, which later spread to Belfast and beyond.

Initially planned as a limited intervention to restore order, Operation Banner would last 38 years and become Britain's longest continuous campaign.

Catholic anger over discrimination in voting, housing and jobs first exploded into riots in Derry, Northern Ireland's only Catholic majority city, in October 1968.

Tension boiled over again on 12 August, 1969, when stone-throwing Catholics protested an annual Apprentice Boys march that skirted the Bogside.

For three days there were ferocious clashes between police, backed by militant Protestants, and mainly young Catholics."



Excellent article here


"
The August 1969 Battle of the Bogside was a three-day riot in the city which saw the people of the Bogside area erect barricades to prevent the RUC entering.

The violence ultimately led to the deployment of British troops on the streets, a decision that was initially welcomed by many of those in the area.

It saw the Irish government respond by promising aid to the Bogsiders but stopping short of providing any kind of military support. Instead Taoiseach Jack Lynch decided on erecting field hospitals for the injured in several areas along the border.

The Battle of the Bogside is not considered the start of the Troubles in Northern Ireland but the events were certainly an escalation that had a major effect on what followed. "

According to an unelected DUP member of the British House of Lords, on an Irish radio station today, stated that whilst all of that was occurring Norn Irn was in the middle of a PIRA bombing campaign........I sh1t you not people.😂


PS, PIRA were unheard of in Aug '69.............nuff said about his history rewrite for now.😂😂😂😂😂😂😂
 

Catahualpa

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The British Army was in the Northern Orange State since its inception in 1921

- and The Forces of the Crown have been in Ireland since 1169

- 800 years before 1969 acc. to my calculator.

Thanks for the thread

- but please don't fall for RTE's attempt to rewrite Irish History.
 

raetsel

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There was a hell of a lot more to it than The Battle Of The Bogside.
Trouble broke out in various NI towns over those few days and the worst violence by far was in Belfast, where seven of the eight fatalities occurred, including ironically the first British soldier, Hugh McCabe, a Catholic home on leave, who was shot on top of the Divis Flats while fighting to defend the area from loyalists.
I knew a few people involved in the Battle Of The Bogside, who by contrast had enjoyed the experience, because there I don't believe and life threatening injuries happened, and from a nationalist point of view it was a famous victory over the RUC and the B Specials.
Because of the fatalities elsewhere though it gradually became clear that the violence of those days marked the point of no return, and the genie was out of the bottle.
 

raetsel

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- and The Forces of the Crown have been in Ireland since 1169
Forces of the Crown? 1169? :rolleyes:

Sweet Mother of Jesus! They were Normans. They spoke French, they integrated, and we are partly descended from them. Scores of Irish surnames are derived from the 1169 invaders and are listed on the link below including one belonging to one of my grandparents.


Some of their vocabulary even became absorbed into the Irish language.

chambre - seomra (room)
garçon - garsún (boy)
Coeur - croí (heart)

orange - oráiste (orange)
bagage - bagáiste (baggage)
passage - pasáiste (passage)
or - óir (gold)
eglise - eaglais (church)

But if a P O'Neill-speak, simpleton's narrative works for you, off you go with it. :)
 

Catahualpa

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Forces of the Crown? 1169? :rolleyes:

Sweet Mother of Jesus! They were Normans. They spoke French, they integrated, and we are partly descended from them. Scores of Irish surnames are derived from the 1169 invaders and are listed on the link below including one belonging to one of my grandparents.


Some of their vocabulary even became absorbed into the Irish language.

chambre - seomra (room)
garçon - garsún (boy)
Coeur - croí (heart)

orange - oráiste (orange)
bagage - bagáiste (baggage)
passage - pasáiste (passage)
or - óir (gold)
eglise - eaglais (church)

But if a P O'Neill-speak, simpleton's narrative works for you, off you go with it. :)
The invaders of Ireland in 1169 owed their allegiance to Henry II the King of England

- they most certainly were 'the Forces of the Crown'

The soldiers deployed on the streets of Derry in August 1969 owed their allegiance to Elizabeth II the Queen of England

Get it now?
 

raetsel

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The invaders of Ireland in 1169 owed their allegiance to Henry II the King of England

- they most certainly were 'the Forces of the Crown'

The soldiers deployed on the streets of Derry in August 1969 owed their allegiance to Elizabeth II the Queen of England

Get it now?
I think you've entirely missed my point. You're employing a contemporary term used exclusively by the Provos and SF, (usually pejoratively) to describe an invasion 850 years ago. It's called an anachronism. :)
 

McTell

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raetsel

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Bogside followed from burntollet, that was the fuse at the start of 1969? OK, lots of fuses.


If I were to pick the moment where you could strongly argue that the genie left the bottle, the August riots were that point. The very fact that the guns came out, and and that eight people died, the burning of Bombay Street, the arrival of British troops on the streets, all of those were unprecedented and shocking.
Furthermore the reputation of whatever rump of the IRA members who remained associated with the organisation had been entirely trashed. They were mocked in Belfast with graffiti such as "IRA = I Ran Away". That led to a split the following December and the effective founding of the Provisional IRA, by people who were determined to fight back.
 

EnglishObserver

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If I were to pick the moment where you could strongly argue that the genie left the bottle, the August riots were that point. The very fact that the guns came out, and and that eight people died, the burning of Bombay Street, the arrival of British troops on the streets, all of those were unprecedented and shocking.
Furthermore the reputation of whatever rump of the IRA members who remained associated with the organisation had been entirely trashed. They were mocked in Belfast with graffiti such as "IRA = I Ran Away". That led to a split the following December and the effective founding of the Provisional IRA, by people who were determined to fight back.
So the real Irish Republicans refused to engage in sectarian violence, knowing exactly where it would end and were mocked by half wits? I see.
 

Mickeymac

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If I were to pick the moment where you could strongly argue that the genie left the bottle, the August riots were that point. The very fact that the guns came out, and and that eight people died, the burning of Bombay Street, the arrival of British troops on the streets, all of those were unprecedented and shocking.
Furthermore the reputation of whatever rump of the IRA members who remained associated with the organisation had been entirely trashed. They were mocked in Belfast with graffiti such as "IRA = I Ran Away". That led to a split the following December and the effective founding of the Provisional IRA, by people who were determined to fight back.

One could also include, prior to those events sir, the sectarian killing of Catholics in 1966 by the UVF and their bombing of installations in the North of Ireland, the loss of a first unionist Westminster parliamentary seat (one of 12 kindly handed to the ruling unionist gerrymandering junta at Stormont by the Brits) the rise of the hatefilled Paisley and his followers which in turn led to the civil rights movement which precedes your accurate account above.
 

EnglishObserver

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One could also include, prior to those events sir, the sectarian killing of Catholics in 1966 by the UVF and their bombing of installations in the North of Ireland, the loss of a first unionist Westminster parliamentary seat (one of 12 kindly handed to the ruling unionist gerrymandering junta at Stormont by the Brits) the rise of the hatefilled Paisley and his followers which in turn led to the civil rights movement which precedes your accurate account above.
Do you think The IRA border campaign in the late fifties/early sixties should be included in the analysis? What about the IRA violence in every decade following partition?
 

Mickeymac

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Do you think The IRA border campaign in the late fifties/early sixties should be included in the analysis? What about the IRA violence in every decade following partition?

Off topic mange, try and keep to the subject being discussed, fed up with folk like you blaming the RA for everything since the biblical great flood whilst all you want to do is deflect from subjects pertaining to the past conflict and when who and what brought it on.
 

EnglishObserver

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Off topic mange, try and keep to the subject being discussed, fed up with folk like you blaming the RA for everything since the biblical great flood whilst all you want to do is deflect from subjects pertaining to the past conflict and when who and what brought it on.
So the activities of The UVF in the mid sixties are relevant, but the activities of The IRA in the early sixties aren't?

What an amusing fellow you are.
 

Newrybhoy

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The IRA in various guises have murdered people in every decade of the last 120 years.

That is all that is relevant to any discussion on when anything started.
 

raetsel

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Terence O'Neill said he was bombed out of office-by the UVF.
Planted by the UVF, and Ian Paisley's UPV, in a joint operation:



Sunday 20 April 1969
Loyalist Bombs

There was an explosion at Silent Valley reservoir in County Down cutting off water supplies to Belfast. There was a second explosion at an electricity pylon at Kilmore, County Armagh. [It was later established that the bombs were planted by Loyalists who were members of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) and the Ulster Protestant Volunteers (UPV). Following these, and earlier attacks on other installations, British troops were assigned to guard key utilities across the region
O'Neill resigned eight days later.

The first IRA bomb wasn't planted until September 1970, when one of their members was killed when his bomb exploded prematurely in Belfast.
 

Catahualpa

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I think you've entirely missed my point. You're employing a contemporary term used exclusively by the Provos and SF, (usually pejoratively) to describe an invasion 850 years ago. It's called an anachronism. :)
The 'Forces of the Crown' is a term that existed before the Provos came along.
 


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