50 years since the Battle of the Bogside



AhNowStop

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Do you think The IRA border campaign in the late fifties/early sixties should be included in the analysis? What about the IRA violence in every decade following partition?
the so called "border campaign" was over and put to bed well before Gusty and the rest of the UVF lads started murdering innocents..

even Alex Kane will tell you that .. in the Newsletter no less .. have a wee read and educate yourself

 

parentheses

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The IRA in various guises have murdered people in every decade of the last 120 years.

That is all that is relevant to any discussion on when anything started.
The troubles began because the Orange State began to disintegrate in 1969. Terence O Neill was driven out of office by his fellow Protestants and British soldiers had to come to NI to stop the Catholics being burned out of Belfast.
 

Mickeymac

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So the activities of The UVF in the mid sixties are relevant, but the activities of The IRA in the early sixties aren't?

What an amusing fellow you are.

My post was not meant to amuse you mange but rather to straighten out your warped and twisted non-equivilantence remark.

BTW, you on the other hand has been amusing us all for years mange.:ROFLMAO:
 

Mickeymac

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They just can't help themselves and then they wonder why people object to their triumphalist marches.


Thankfully that is their last and their gross disrespect for the dead and their living relatives has now ended.
 

Round tower

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They just can't help themselves and then they wonder why people object to their triumphalist marches.
They said that they did not discover that this band was wearing these tops till the end, did they not have organisers and stewards at the start of the parade. Who should have alerted the main people about this, where action of remove the tops or cover up the emblems
 

Paddyc

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The troubles began because the Orange State began to disintegrate in 1969. Terence O Neill was driven out of office by his fellow Protestants and British soldiers had to come to NI to stop the Catholics being burned out of Belfast.
British soldiers were sent to NI to advance British interests. The same reason British soldiers are sent anywhere.
 

Mickeymac

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British soldiers were sent to NI to advance British interests. The same reason British soldiers are sent anywhere.


Absolutely Paddy, but it is a fact that when the loyalist hate mobs seen "their so called army" in full combat heading towards them, causing them to retreat, saved many more defenseless Catholic families from being burned out of their homes.
 

EnglishObserver

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the so called "border campaign" was over and put to bed well before Gusty and the rest of the UVF lads started murdering innocents..

even Alex Kane will tell you that .. in the Newsletter no less .. have a wee read and educate yourself

Oh, I'd say that nothing is ever really 'put to bed' in Northern Ireland.
 

EnglishObserver

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Absolutely Paddy, but it is a fact that when the loyalist hate mobs seen "their so called army" in full combat heading towards them, causing them to retreat, saved many more defenseless Catholic families from being burned out of their homes.
Yes, UK armed forces undoubtably saved the lives of many Nationalists and Republicans - unlike PIRA who insured the deaths of many in their community - or even caused them directly.
 

Levellers

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Thankfully that is their last and their gross disrespect for the dead and their living relatives has now ended.
Firstly that is not an apology.

Secondly they know they are in trouble by breaking the agreement they had with the local community. Even the PSNI confirm the deal was broken.

They have allowed the DUP to walk them into a cul-de-sac.
 

Mickeymac

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Firstly that is not an apology.

Secondly they know they are in trouble by breaking the agreement they had with the local community. Even the PSNI confirm the deal was broken.

They have allowed the DUP to walk them into a cul-de-sac.

Once again, they have only themselves to blame from access to those walls of Doire which they embrace as part of their "culture"
 

AhNowStop

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Oh, I'd say that nothing is ever really 'put to bed' in Northern Ireland.
Due to the scaremongering & behind the scenes organisation of the likes of Paisley & Co, the "troubles" kicked off when the UVF started murdering people & planting bombs from 1966 on ... and all due to not wanting civil rights for their fenian neighbours & their inherent insecurity about 50 years on from 1916 .. Its truly disgusting when you think of it
 
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Antóin Mac Comháin

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The British Army was in the Northern Orange State since its inception in 1921

- and The Forces of the Crown have been in Ireland since 1169

- 800 years before 1969 acc. to my calculator.

The Battle of Tara - 980

'The Battle of Tara was fought between the Gaelic Irish of Meath, led by Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, and the Norse Vikings of Dublin, led by Amlaíb Cuarán. It took place near the Hill of Tara in Ireland in the year 980. The battle was a devastating defeat for the Vikings and led to the Irish regaining control of Dublin. The Battle of Tara is regarded as a far more decisive defeat for the Norse of Dublin than the later, and much more famous, Battle of Clontarf. Olaf Cuaran was the last of the great Norse kings in Ireland, and following him the status of the Kingdom of Dublin was never the same again.'

The Battle of Glenmalure - 1580

'The Battle of Glenmalure (Irish: Cath Ghleann Molúra) took place in Ireland on 25 August 1580 during the Desmond Rebellions. An Irish Catholic force made up of the Gaelic clans from the Wicklow Mountains led by Fiach MacHugh O'Byrne and James Eustace, Viscount Baltinglas of the Pale, defeated an English army under Arthur Grey, 14th Baron Grey de Wilton, at the O'Byrnes' mountain stronghold of Glenmalure.

Irish sources state that around 800 English soldiers were killed, though the English put their losses at 360 dead. Among those killed was Peter Carew, cousin of his namesake colonist who had made claims to, and won, large tracts of land in southern Ireland. The remainder of the English force retreated to lowland Wicklow and from there to Dublin.'

Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaills claim was as the High King of all-Ireland, whereas the claim of Amlaíb Cuarán was to Dublin and Northumbria. As far as Fiach MacHugh O'Byrne was concerned, the Battle of Glenmalure was nothing more and nothing less than a continuation of the Battle of Tara 600 years earlier. Far too much space has been afforded by the history books to the notions of rebellious Irish Republican Protestants.
 


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