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75% of junior docs leaving...


ruserious

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,597
For balance, we are getting a load of junior docs from the third world which has a bigger effect on where they come from compared to when we lose Irish doctors.
 

niall78

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Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Messages
11,285
'Those interviewed said they were looking for further training opportunities, a better lifestyle and good working conditions.'

Greedy ba5tards! Don't they know there are bankers debts to pay? Maybe we could make them stay by holding their kids hostage till they've paid off their education. :roll:

********

Good point ruserious but if the HSE don't give a sh1t about Irish doctors and nurses do you think they care about the effect recruiting from the Third World has on those countries?
 

Bleu Poppy

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Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
4,570
They got their free third level education and this is how they repay the Irish taxpayer?

What ought to be done is a full reintroduction of fees for our third level institutions, Those who want a free education at this level should enter into contracts whereby they commit to working as teachers, nurses, local authority engineers, doctors, etc, for a fixed number of years after qualifying to pay the State back.
 

Fractional Reserve

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Joined
Apr 30, 2011
Messages
8,326
The place is full of of Nigerian , arab , indian docs , i was in an a and e and didnt see one young irish doc on call .I was lucky to get out of the place alive .
For balance, we are getting a load of junior docs from the third world which has a bigger effect on where they come from compared to when we lose Irish doctors.
 

Bleu Poppy

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
4,570
For balance, doctors come here from the third-world because of the higher standard of education here and the greater training opportunities.
 

Bleu Poppy

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
4,570
For balance, some of the best care that I, and members of my family, have received has been from non-national doctors, be it in A & E, private hospitals, or the G.P.s local surgery.
 

Dame_Enda

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Joined
Dec 14, 2011
Messages
52,057
A sample size of 108 is miniscule and of questionable value.
 

Fractional Reserve

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Joined
Apr 30, 2011
Messages
8,326
i couldnt give a flying f88k.I was let lying around for 13 hrs after suffering a heart attack ,all test done show elevation in ecg and blood enzymes as plain as the nose on your face .It wasn't until i threaten to walk out drive 50 miles to see a cardiologist they hop me in an ambulance and i got emergency stents .Not one Irish doc had looked at me .
You'll be lucky to get out of here alive after those comments :p
 

DownTheyGo

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Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
5,314
i couldnt give a flying f88k.I was let lying around for 13 hrs after suffering a heart attack ,all test done show elevation in ecg and blood enzymes as plain as the nose on your face .It wasn't until i threaten to walk out drive 50 miles to see a cardiologist they hop me in an ambulance and i got emergency stents .Not one Irish doc had looked at me .
Hope you're okay now. Been in a similar situation with family member, some foreign A&E doc kept diagnosing her with stomach inflation and sending her home. After a 12 hour wait one night, 3am in the morning, I told the doc his diagnosis is up his ar$e when he tried to send her home again with same diagnosis... got her out of there and in somewhere else, diagnosed with stomach cancer ripping through. A great Irish guy treated her throughout. I learned recently he's leaving for Australia now. It's our loss because he is truly gifted and I'll be forever grateful to him. I wish you well in every regard.
 
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Beaker

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Joined
Apr 6, 2010
Messages
452
The set-up for training doctors in Ireland is not fit for purpose.

The considerable resources, infrastructure and finances invested in educating and training doctors should not be to produce an exportable comodity. Especially when their education is so heavily subsidised.

Doctors educated in a national health and education service, should be obligated to work in that service for a certain number of years post qualification, or else the should have to pay the full economic cost of their training.

A huge problem with the education of doctors in Ireland is that it was dominated (until very recently) by the education of non EU nationals, rather than Irish nationals. This was purely a cash cow for the universities & medical schools, as they could charge the full economic cost to non EU nationals (circa 30K per year).

In essence the entire context, purpose and framework for education and training of doctors in Ireland needs to be rethought. Afterall as a nation, it needs to serve the national interest primarily, and not the indivdual interests of mercinary, rather then medically minded individuals....
 
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firefly123

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
28,155
i couldnt give a flying f88k.I was let lying around for 13 hrs after suffering a heart attack ,all test done show elevation in ecg and blood enzymes as plain as the nose on your face .It wasn't until i threaten to walk out drive 50 miles to see a cardiologist they hop me in an ambulance and i got emergency stents .Not one Irish doc had looked at me .
Maybe they knew your views on public servants ;)


(just kidding FR hope your doing better!)
 

4horsemen

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
2,992
The step-up for training doctors in Ireland is not fit for purpose.

The considerable resources, infrastructure and finances invested in educating and training doctors should not be to produce an exportable comodity. Especially when their education is so heavily subsidised.

Doctors educated in a national health and education service, should be obligated to work in that service for a certain number of years post qualification, or else the should have to pay the full economic cost of their training.

A huge problem with the education of doctors in Ireland is that it was dominated (until very recently) by the education of non EU nationals, rather than Irish nationals. This was purely a cash cow for the universities & medical schools, as they could charge the full economic cost to non EU nationals (circa 30K per year).

In essence the entire context, purpose and framework for education and training of doctors in Ireland needs to be rethought. Afterall as a nation, it needs to serve the national interest primarily, and not the indivdual interests of mercinary, rather then medically minded individuals....
I agree with you; if we have a shortage of Irish/EU medics then increase the quota for CAO entrants to the current total capacity of each course. That would more than double the number of Irish graduates in 5/6 years.
 

CavanFF

Member
Joined
May 18, 2007
Messages
55
75% are leaving straight after doing their obligatory year post grad. Remaining 25 % probably leave over the coming 2-3 years as the realisation of working for the HSE really hits them. Even if you asked them to stay for 3 years after qualification then they would high tail it out bring their experience with them. No Trish middle grade doctors would be left. Same for all the professions
 

Con Gallagher

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Joined
May 25, 2010
Messages
2,413
Long hours, low promotion opportunities, antiquated work practices, abuse from drunks, high taxes to pay 5 years of deficits plus banking debt, the weather; I'm surprised 25% are planning to stay.
 

publicrealm

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2007
Messages
6,034
Doesn't compute - if the Daily Mail is to be believed:

Figures obtained by the Irish Daily Mail show that Junior Doctors shared in €85 million worth of overtime pay from the HSE last year. One junior doctor collected an extra €170,000 in overtime payments alone last year on top of an annual wage of at least €65,000.

https://www.facebook.com/tv3IrelandAM
 
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