92 years after meeting of first Dáil, is it time to consider a repeat performance?

darkknight

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There can be endless Prime Times, Frontlines, Livelines, Vincent Browne debates, newspaper articles, message board discussions, protest marches, etc., etc. ... but when the dust settles, all we are left with are endless volumes of rhetoric and bluster, while what is needed is action!

According to the account on the Oireachtas website:

In the aftermath of the Easter Rising of 1916 Sinn Féin, the party founded by Arthur Griffith in 1905, was reorganised and grew into a nation-wide movement. ... Acting on the pledge not to sit in the Westminster parliament, but instead to set up an Irish legislative assembly, 28 of the newly-elected Sinn Féin representatives met and constituted themselves as the first Dáil Éireann....

The first Dáil met in the Round Room of the Mansion House on 21 January 1919. The Dáil asserted the exclusive right of the elected representatives of the Irish people to legislate for the country. The Members present adopted a Provisional Constitution and approved a Declaration of Independence. The Dáil also approved a Democratic Programme, based on the 1916 Proclamation of the Irish Republic, and read and adopted a Message to the Free Nations of the World.

It is widely accepted that the Oireachtas is presently, and for some time now, a discredited institution. Bad as the present Fianna Fail/Green Party Government is, many people feel that the most likely Fine Gael/Labour alternative represents more of the same, with a different cast of leading actors, but the same all too familiar script.

Pre-election pledges of political reform are taken with a grain of salt. Most people will be astonished if it doesn't turn out to be the same old same old, with a few superficial tweaks, but a safeguarding of the essentials (parish pump tomfoolery, pointless Dail and Seanad talkshops, inflated salaries, ministerial limousines, scandalous expenses and pensions, jobs for the pals on semi-State boards and quangos, etc.).

As the George Lee fiasco demonstrated all too clearly, there is no point in a few random celebs presenting themselves to the electorate as would-be messiahs. They may enter Leinster House to resounding cheers and making all kinds of promises, but, inevitably, the established system will wear them down and, eventually, either assimilate them or spit them out.

It is the established political institutions themselves - including the Constitution - that are in crisis and in need of a complete makeover. But these institutions will not, and can not, reform themselves from within. If change is to happen, it must come from without. This was true in 1919, when Sinn Fein decided to boycott Westminster, and it remains true in 2010/11.

Could enough candidates, from whatever political party or none at all, be persuaded to stand in the upcoming General Election on a platform of boycotting Leinster House and agreeing to convene instead in an alternative location (back to the Mansion House?) with the objective of using the mandate given to them by the electorate to initiate the process of genuine reform of the State's institutions by challenging the authority and legitimacy of the circus in Leinster House?

It took just 28 elected representatives to initiate a revolutionary process on January 21, 1919. Could a similar number do so again in 2011?
 


bobbyjoe

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Oct 13, 2010
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35
Yes it could happen again, and should.

Something like this.
Second Republic

Or
Iceland is to review its constitution in a unique experiment in direct democracy that will see citizens forming a new people's assembly.

An election tomorrow will select up to 31 citizens who will form the constitutional assembly that will convene early next year. Those elected will receive a salary equal to that of Iceland's MPs while the review takes place.

One candidate, Thorvaldur Gylfason, a professor of economics at the University of Iceland, said the country needed a fresh start after its economic implosion in 2008. "We need to ensure that the sort of malpractice and negligence that… led to the collapse of the Icelandic economy two years ago, cannot happen again.

Iceland to elect citizens' panel to rewrite constitution | World news | The Guardian
 

bogtrotter

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Well as sinn fein are still around 92 years later and seem to be on the spiral, it is not beyond reason that they could do it again....Only thing this time, stay in there and don't allow political adventurers steal what you have achieved........Wouldn't it be a dream come true if SF could achieve a majority again, 92 years after they did so in the 1st Dail.....
 

edifice.

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In all of this economic commotion and histrionics a central point is being missed; it's not just the behaviour of the state which is an affront to the Proclamation and the Declaration of Independence but its very existence also. That is the context in whiich those calling for reform should be measured.

Didn't Junket John below have a role in recreating the Dail on its 90th anniversary? As CC didn't he pose as the rightful heir of the first CC?

 

darkknight

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Sean Keating's 'An Allegory' (painted in 1922):




Brian McCarthy's 'Sword of Justice' (painted in 2010)

 


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