A 20 year old's take on her prospects when government chooses banks over people

He3

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How did you see your future at 20? Aisling Twomey (20), about to graduate, gives us something to think over.



At 20, and I mean this with no exaggeration, I feel quite terminally worthless and helpless to do anything about it.

I was always so sure that I would stay here, live here, work here and thrive here. I felt, as I grew into a booming economy that offered me a lot and took nothing away, that I had a great hand to play and more cards to refresh my stock should some options not work out.

Now I don’t think I have an ace in the hole; my options are disappearing from my hand quite quickly, because my Government prefers to save the bankers than the youth of the nation.

If I stay in Ireland, I’ll be forced to pay for that preference – a preference I resent, made by a leadership that devalues me; a preference I never made.

I don’t expect to be in Ireland to pay the price of that failure. A generation is turning its back on the State. We might forever be seen as unpatriotic. We could have waited, they’ll say; we could have stuck it out.

That’s all fine and well – but I won’t take lessons in patriotism from a Government that chooses banks over people.

As Brian Cowen himself has said – I find that to be beyond the pale.

State that chooses banks over people has no right to talk patriotism - The Irish Times - Tue, Oct 12, 2010
 


Cato

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If I was a young graduate with no responsibilities here, I would get the hell out of Ireland. Why stay here and spend your working life paying for this mess? Go abroad and live in a properly run country where your taxes will go towards paying for well run public services and not towards banks and their bondholders.

The only thing holding me here is that my wife is reluctant to move unless things get really bad for us. Mrs. Cato is a home bird. If it was my choice alone we would be out of here.

Life in exile abroad would be preferable to life in slavery here.
 

neversaydie

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How did you see your future at 20? Aisling Twomey (20), about to graduate, gives us something to think over.



At 20, and I mean this with no exaggeration, I feel quite terminally worthless and helpless to do anything about it.

I was always so sure that I would stay here, live here, work here and thrive here. I felt, as I grew into a booming economy that offered me a lot and took nothing away, that I had a great hand to play and more cards to refresh my stock should some options not work out.

Now I don’t think I have an ace in the hole; my options are disappearing from my hand quite quickly, because my Government prefers to save the bankers than the youth of the nation.

If I stay in Ireland, I’ll be forced to pay for that preference – a preference I resent, made by a leadership that devalues me; a preference I never made.

I don’t expect to be in Ireland to pay the price of that failure. A generation is turning its back on the State. We might forever be seen as unpatriotic. We could have waited, they’ll say; we could have stuck it out.

That’s all fine and well – but I won’t take lessons in patriotism from a Government that chooses banks over people.

As Brian Cowen himself has said – I find that to be beyond the pale.

State that chooses banks over people has no right to talk patriotism - The Irish Times - Tue, Oct 12, 2010

At twenty years of age this young lass sounds like a 70 year old woman, for heavens sake young people need to wake up and smell the coffee, it was never easy at twenty to make it in life except for the spoilt brats that had everything handed to them during the celtic tiger years. This lass should get her backpack and travel.

This crying from a twenty year old is so annoying when there are people struggling with mortages and families. To be honest a kick in the ass comes to mind.
 

greengoose2

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At twenty years of age this young lass sounds like a 70 year old woman, for heavens sake young people need to wake up and smell the coffee, it was never easy at twenty to make it in life except for the spoilt brats that had everything handed to them during the celtic tiger years. This lass should get her backpack and travel.

This crying from a twenty year old is so annoying when there are people struggling with mortages and families. To be honest a kick in the ass comes to mind.
Maybe the young lass doesn't want to struggle with mortgages and families. What she sees is that one buys a house at an inflated price. Then the house becomes a liability, a millstone around one's neck. All thanks to sleaze, corruption and ineptitude of the people elected to run the country.

You may take your high horse and run it out of the stable before the door gets shut...

I haven't mentioned the poor educational system, hospital care or the myriad of other failings in this failed Banana republic.
 

keepitreal

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How did you see your future at 20? Aisling Twomey (20), about to graduate, gives us something to think over.



At 20, and I mean this with no exaggeration, I feel quite terminally worthless and helpless to do anything about it.

I was always so sure that I would stay here, live here, work here and thrive here. I felt, as I grew into a booming economy that offered me a lot and took nothing away, that I had a great hand to play and more cards to refresh my stock should some options not work out.

Now I don’t think I have an ace in the hole; my options are disappearing from my hand quite quickly, because my Government prefers to save the bankers than the youth of the nation.

If I stay in Ireland, I’ll be forced to pay for that preference – a preference I resent, made by a leadership that devalues me; a preference I never made.

I don’t expect to be in Ireland to pay the price of that failure. A generation is turning its back on the State. We might forever be seen as unpatriotic. We could have waited, they’ll say; we could have stuck it out.

That’s all fine and well – but I won’t take lessons in patriotism from a Government that chooses banks over people.

As Brian Cowen himself has said – I find that to be beyond the pale.

State that chooses banks over people has no right to talk patriotism - The Irish Times - Tue, Oct 12, 2010
Interesting how many times she uses "I" this and "I" that.. It's all about me!!.... with 'We' only mentioned 3 times..

Smacks of false expectations nurtured by cheap borrowed money and never being told 'No' by mummy or daddy... The celtic cubs suffer from entitlement-itis. :roll:

I agree on the banks over people perspective though, think most people do.
 
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SO she happy to have availed of everything the country provided but doesn't feel she needs to pay any of it back.

Sounds like a smug self serving graduate who feels someone owes her a living.
 

A view from England

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At twenty years of age this young lass sounds like a 70 year old woman, for heavens sake young people need to wake up and smell the coffee, it was never easy at twenty to make it in life except for the spoilt brats that had everything handed to them during the celtic tiger years. This lass should get her backpack and travel.

This crying from a twenty year old is so annoying when there are people struggling with mortages and families. To be honest a kick in the ass comes to mind.
+1.

If this whining graduate had anything about her she would be looking to create wealth and jobs utilising the skills she has learnt on the back of the Irish taxpayer who has funded her education. Instead she is looking for an easy way out. Too many young people look for an easy life.
 

roc_

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At twenty years of age this young lass sounds like a 70 year old woman, for heavens sake young people need to wake up and smell the coffee, it was never easy at twenty to make it in life except for the spoilt brats that had everything handed to them during the celtic tiger years. This lass should get her backpack and travel.

This crying from a twenty year old is so annoying when there are people struggling with mortages and families. To be honest a kick in the ass comes to mind.
Yeah Aisling, go sow your wild oats in Bondi beach for a year, have the 'craic' and then come back and put that bridle on over your head like everybody else and stop your whinging and crying. - If such lack of imagination and spirit was good enough for the rest of us, it should be good enough for you. Join the herd, Aisling. You'll soon get over your desire to speak your real mind in front of the Irish public. :roll:
 

Cato

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So she happy to have availed of everything the country provided but doesn't feel she needs to pay any of it back.

Sounds like a smug self serving graduate who feels someone owes her a living.
She sounds like someone who wants to make the best of her life and realizes that this cannot happen in Ireland, so why not go abroad. Frankly, I'm surprised that more people haven't simply up sticks and moved to another country leaving their debts behind them.
 

Squire Allworthy

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A period of travel widens experience and increases skills, but don't expect it to be easy.

What skills do you have? What languages do you have a working knowledge off? Why countries do you think will allow you in other than the EU? What networks do you have abroad?

If you are prepared to work and are persistent you will get by anywhere including Ireland.

As long as you have the fare home you have nothing to lose. There are better places to live than Ireland at the moment, but there are also a lot worse.

Forget about the National picture, you have little or no control over that no matter where you go. Most people are on this earth to work and get by. That is how it has always been. So pick the course that best suits you, and sometimes a throw of the dice is necessary.
 

roc_

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There's intelligence and courage displayed in Aisling's article. On that basis, if she was to accept the 'advice' of middle-aged, conservative internet bloggers posting on a slightly sad political website, then I would have to say there's no hope for this country. - Real generational renewal is perhaps the biggest hope we have, and hopefully, the generation that comes after us will be SO different, that they will be unrecognisable to us. We need that 'generation gap' to be as big as possible. Trying to make them like us, while it may be well intentioned, is very much the wrong thing to do. - It is the source of real change.
 

farnaby

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This is a perennial concern of Irish youth, only exacerbated by recession. The young feel stifled by life in Ireland and see life abroad as free and full of opportunity. Her feelings are not much different to my experience of student life in the 90s. I happily returned to Dublin after education in the UK to find practically all my peers dying to get out of the country even as growth rates soared.
 

Bridget558

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Not this again

Alot of people in this country dont seem to understand that the "boom" we had was not normal, it has nothing to do with the banks that we are spending 50 billion a year and talking in 30 billion in taxes.
 

Cato

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Alot of people in this country dont seem to understand that the "boom" we had was not normal, it has nothing to do with the banks that we are spending 50 billion a year and talking in 30 billion in taxes.
Who wants to be around when that gap is closed by rising taxes and slashed services? The young, free, and talented should leave now and make a better life for themselves abroad. Escape from the incompetence, cronyism, gombeenism, and corruption of Ireland.
 

Bebsaboo

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I reject the patriotism argument. Why should we, the younger generation, pay for the folly of the older generation? You're on your own lads. Here's a shovel. Dig yourselves out.
 

Iarmhi Gael

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At twenty years of age this young lass sounds like a 70 year old woman, for heavens sake young people need to wake up and smell the coffee, it was never easy at twenty to make it in life except for the spoilt brats that had everything handed to them during the celtic tiger years. This lass should get her backpack and travel.

This crying from a twenty year old is so annoying when there are people struggling with mortages and families. To be honest a kick in the ass comes to mind.
Got to agree with you - But she's entitled to her opinion.

Smacks of I should be entitled to this, this and this when in fact Life's not a walk in the park
 

ibis

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I was going to say she should have tried the Eighties...and then I thought:

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe1a1wHxTyo]YouTube - Monty Python - Four Yorkshiremen[/ame]
 

Josip Broz

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Interesting how many times she uses "I" this and "I" that.. It's all about me!!.... with 'We' only mentioned 3 times..

Smacks of false expectations nurtured by cheap borrowed money and never being told 'No' by mummy or daddy... The celtic cubs suffer from entitlement-itis. :roll:

I agree on the banks over people perspective though, think most people do.
She begins the article by saying "I WAS born in May 1990 – in the middle of an economic recession. I’ll turn 21 next year, at the same time that I’ll complete my degree".

In other words she has lived all her life during good times and never lived through a recession (I've seen three at least!). That's what always worried me about the tiger generation - what levels of inner strength and resources have they developed to weather the bad times?
 


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