A Chinatown in Dublin: Racist or Progressive?

Dr Pat

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There currently is a push from certain quarters for a part of Parnell Street in Dublin to be officially designated by Dublin Corporation as a 'Chinatown' with a petition online for installation of a Chinese Arch.

https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/make-chinatown-dublin-official-time-for-a-gate

It is claimed that Google has already designated the area in their maps as Chinatown and as according to the blurb there is estimated to be 70000 Chinese living in Dublin it is time to officially recognise that.

According to a fairly breathless report in The Business on RTE Radio 1 yesterday in which both pro and con views were expressed by local and mostly immigrant business owners were aired, the proposal is currently being considered by the Corporation who said they welcome submissions on the idea.

The RTE report seemed to suggest that part of the impetus for this proposal is to encourage tourism and help property enhancement. The rationale in part expressed seems to be all world cities have a Chinatown and therefore Dublin should have one.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1744914705796573&id=1713815815573129

The comments on the petiton website seem to be positive which is no surprise. However the comments on the facebook link are more mixed.

Concerns have been expressed that such a move might discriminate against other ethnicities.

Should Dublin's Chinatown Get a Friendship Arch?

Would such a designation constitute a racist and an ill-advised retrograde step?

Why in this age of integration should any part of Dublin be identified with a distinct ethnic identity?

I thought all this sort of stuff is now off limits as racist and cultural chauvinism? In addition, does it not foster division and hinder the growth of Irish identity among the Chinese who have made their homes here and their descendants by preserving the primacy of immigrant cultural identity? Will newly arriving Chinese only settle there and not be inclined to integrate within broader Irish society? Will official endorsement lead to ghettoisation? And are we at risk of fostering division among the various immigrants groups now settling in Dublin?

Surely our chattering and property classes so imbued with the ethos of multicultural Ireland and captivated by the glint of gold would not contemplate advocating taking such risks? Answers on the back of a postcard please to Dublin Corporation.
 
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Cruimh

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There currently is a push from certain quarters for a part of Parnell Street in Dublin to be officially designated by Dublin Corporation as a 'Chinatown' with a petition online for installation of a Chinese Arch.

https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/make-chinatown-dublin-official-time-for-a-gate

It is claimed that Google has already designated the area in their maps as Chinatown and as according to the blurb there is estimated to be 70000 Chinese living in Dublin it is time to officially recognise that.

According to a fairly breathless report in The Business on RTE Radio 1 yesterday in which both pro and con views were expressed by local and mostly immigrant business owners were aired, the proposal is currently being considered by the Corporation who said they welcome submissions on the idea.

The RTE report seemed to suggest that part of the impetus for this proposal is to encourage tourism and help property enhancement. The rationale in part expressed seems to be all world cities have a Chinatown and therefore Dublin should have one.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1744914705796573&id=1713815815573129

The comments on the petiton website seem to be positive which is no surprise. However the comments on the facebook link are more mixed.

Concerns have been expressed that such a move might discriminate against other ethnicities.

Should Dublin's Chinatown Get a Friendship Arch?

Would such a designation constitute a racist and an ill-advised retrograde step?

Why in this age of integration should any part of Dublin be identified with a distinct ethnic identity?

I thought all this sort of stuff is now off limits as racist and cultural chauvinism? In addition, does it not foster division and hinder the growth of Irish identity among the Chinese who have made their homes here and their descendants by preserving the primacy of immigrant cultural identity? Will newly arriving Chinese only settle there and not be inclined to integrate within broader Irish society? And are we at risk of fostering division among the various immigrants groups now settling in Dublin?

Surely our chattering and property classes so imbued with the ethos of multicultural Ireland and captivated by the glint of gold would not contemplate advocating taking such risks? Answers on the back of a postcard please to Dublin Corporation.
Are you suggesting the Gaeltacht should be abolished?

Or that the Belfast Cultúrlann is racist and regressive?
 

Accidental sock

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In China...they're just called 'towns'
 

Dr Pat

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Are you suggesting the Gaeltacht should be abolished?

Or that the Belfast Cultúrlann is racist and regressive?
Irish is an official language of the natives, Cruimh. As language is non-political, I take it you are in favour though. :D
 

Congalltee

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Parnell st is full of Korean, Vietnamese, Indian and Chinese restaurants. Why alienate them?
 

sethjem7

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I don't live too far away and I'm glad that they've made an effort in a street that was basically left to ruin, more power to them and there is an energy coming into the street. Now, if only DCC would bother their arse tackling the illegal dumping coming from the slum tenancies they've allowed prop up over the shops, we'd have a much improved situation, but that is for another thread.
 

dresden8

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How does Norris feel about this. Or does he just want Dublin scobies barred from his street. Will young Tibetan boys pass his test?

A race to get gated: Does living in a gated development really cut down on crime? - Independent.ie

Even David Norris, the senator and erstwhile presidential candidate, harboured ultimately unsuccessful ambitions in 2000 to close off part of his north Dublin street. Norris, who co-founded the North Great Georges Street Preservation Society, and his neighbours drew up a plan to close the lower end of the street to traffic by installing decorative wrought-iron gates.
 

Accidental sock

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In Dublin, Parnell Street is just called a sh1thole
When Fibber Magees used to do ' £1 for a pint' before 11.00am on Wednesdays in 1991, it was the height of sophisticaton and class.
 

Roll_On

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I think by and large Irish people are pretty happy with migrants from East Asia. They generally keep to the law of the land, they aren't violent, they don't engage in abhorrent cultural practices that contravine western values like more primitive cultures from Africa and the middle east. Certainly natives are a thousand timea safer In the China towns of Europe than they are in Muslim or African areas. An arch could be nice and Chinese new year in Dublin is always a hoot.
 

Henry94.

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The Chinese have been model citizens in Ireland in my experience. The generations born here are fully integrated and if they want a Chinatown in Dublin they have my full support.
 


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