A Cornish Census



D

Duth Ealla

Can I ask, are there surnames which are specifically Cornish, as in Cornish language, not English (and I don't mean fakey concoctions from English-origin surnames, rather actual Cornish surnames)?
Might be wrong here but...

By Tre, Tra, Tren you may know the cornish men.

Trevellyn, Trelayney.
 

QuizMaster

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That would make me Cornish. My surmane starts like one of those.

But I'm not, I'm Irish. Ulster through and through.
 
D

Duth Ealla

That would make me Cornish. My surmane starts like one of those.

But I'm not, I'm Irish. Ulster through and through.
sure your only a settler Quizmaster :D but still a celt ;)

seriously though some gaelic names were anglicised in very unsual ways.

Armstrong being one that comes to mind. Its probably unlikely but it may be that your name is one of those or not Cornish at all.

ARMSTRONG
This surname originates in the area along the western Scottish borders; the first recorded bearer was Adam Armstrong, pardoned in Carlisle in 1235 for causing another man’s death. They were among the most notorious of the riding Border clans, who also included the Elliots, the Grahams and the Johnstons, famous for their lawlessness and plunder. When the power of these clans was savagely broken after 1603 by James 1, the Armstrongs scattered, and many migrated to Ulster, where a large number settled in Co Fermanagh. Even today, Fermanagh is home to the largest concentration of Armstrong families in Ireland, although the name is quite common throughout Ulster, particularly in counties Antrim and Tyrone. As well as those of Scottish origin, however, a good number of Irish Armstrongs are of Gaelic Irish extraction. Many of the Trin-Laverys of Co Antrim and the Trainors of counties Tyrone and Monaghan had their surnames mis-translated as Armstrong, from the presence of the Irish for ‘strong’, trean, in their original names.
 
D

Duth Ealla

Dydh da[ˈdɪːð ˈdaː]"good day"

Myttin da[ˈmɪttin ˈdaː]"good morning

both being fairly recognisable to an irish person
 

cornubian

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Once more for the UK census people will be able to record their ethnic and/or national identity as Cornish. Equally they will be able to register their country of birth as Cornwall. The problem, as last time, is that they will all be write-in options. Full details can be found here: 2011 Census ? Cornish Identity

Facebook and Twitter accounts also exist. A simple search will find them.

An interesting YouTube video can be found here: [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvldovHFj68]YouTube - Vote Cornish ! Cornish Census Day 27th March 2011[/ame]
 

euryalus

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I thought the full version was:

"By Tre, Pol, Ross, Lan and Pen,
I will tell thee the most Cornishmen".

As a matter of interest, the Great Western Railway had a locomotive named "Tre, Pol & Pen".
 
Last edited:

Molly Maguire

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Once more for the UK census people will be able to record their ethnic and/or national identity as Cornish. Equally they will be able to register their country of birth as Cornwall. The problem, as last time, is that they will all be write-in options. Full details can be found here: 2011 Census ? Cornish Identity

Facebook and Twitter accounts also exist. A simple search will find them.

An interesting YouTube video can be found here: YouTube - Vote Cornish ! Cornish Census Day 27th March 2011
Wonder what our unionist brethern on here make of all this.
 

doloras

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"Tre" is the Cornish prefix meaning "town", same as Welsh "tref".

"Pen", in Welsh and Cornish, means "head" or "headland".
 


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