A dose of the IMFs could be good for Ireland

D

Deleted member 17573

In other words you don´t know - you´re a spoofer. Wheres your evidence?

I know from a very good source in the Central Bank that this is their modus operandi but do I know of specific instances, no I don't. Why not do your own research? Look at the videos and links posted about the IMF on this and other threads so find out what they do. They are far from being our saviours and they wont come in "to put manners on FF" as many seem to hope.
You claimed that the IMF would close down hospitals and schools en masse and you went on to say that this is their modus operandi. So, I ask again, where have they done this?
 


Dredger

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 14, 2010
Messages
379
In other words you don´t know - you´re a spoofer:roll:
Latvia had to close half of its hospitals while under IMF diktat. Similar stories in Ukraine, Romania and practically every other country that they got their filthy hands on. Maybe you should do a little research. Don't be lazy.

Anyone who thinks that the IMF will be good for Ireland is a blithering idiot, a dunce. The IMF is only good for the private banks that it works for.
 

Odyessus

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2007
Messages
12,890
The IMF would "nurture" nothing, just collect debt as painlessly as possible. The IMF are part of the "elite". They certainly have no interest in killing off "elites" per se.

All that "gutting" and "shutting down" and "cleaning out" you seem to be salivating over would involve real lives, real jobs (many low-paid) real human beings, real hardship, to add to all the rest of the hardship.

The IMF don't do hilarity. Maybe you find the prospect of people losing their jobs or having their salaries decimated "hilarious". I take it that you are convinced that the IMF axe will not fall on you, and that you find the prospect of others suffering, but not you, somewhat cheering.

Have a care. The very "middle class" and "taxpayers" you feel would benefit from IMF intervention, would of course be its victims. And so would you.[/QUOT


Sunday November 07 2010
ENOUGH is enough. That's the title of Fintan O'Toole's book of aspirations for a new Ireland. Like my mother's aspirations -- Sweet Heart of Jesus, I place all my trust in Thee -- its pious platitudes are attempts to escape the problems of the real world.

Fintan sets out five aspirations; security, equality, education, health, citizenship. I could make a wish-list too. But I would feel a fraud if I failed to point out -- as Fintan fails --that all ambitions are hot air unless we cut public-sector pay and pensions back to 2003 levels.

The book sidles past this fundamental problem as if it were peripheral. The index does not even have an entry on it. No "public sector: scandal of" or even "reform of". It's like a book on Northern Ireland that never mentions religion.

Let me put a bush in that gap. The burden of public pay and pensions is the elephant in the room, the fattest of the fat cats, the problem that transcends all problems. As generalities are the enemy of good politics, let me explain why, using one euro, 100 cents, for clarity.

Out of every 100 cents it spends, the State spends 30 cents on public-service pay and pensions. Out of every 100 cents it takes in tax, it spends 60 on public-sector pay and pensions. The forthcoming Budget is fundamentally about wiping up whatever is little is left after the public-sector fat cats have finished their big bowl of cream.

The Budget will ask the poor, the sick and the old to pay for the paid, pensioned and the permanently employed. This is a scandal. The Government could find the €6bn it needs by simply cutting back public pay and pensions to 2003 levels. No tax hikes, no tormenting of old-age pensioners, no picking the pockets of the poor.

So why doesn't it do it? Because the political and media classes are afraid of the public sector. Last week the Dail and RTE were delighted to debate any distraction -- McDaid, Moriarty, Merkel -- anything except talk about the enormous elephant in the room, which is eating most of our resources.

Let me prove that. Mary Harney cannot cut into the 70 per cent of her health budget because it is marked for the pay and pensions. Mary Coughlan cannot cut into the 90 per cent of her education budget that is marked for teacher pay and pensions. Both will have to cut into the little that is left.

May I make myself really unpopular by pointing to a fat cat that is always full of self-pity? Irish teachers are the best paid in Europe. They also take the most holidays. If you think they take three months off in summer, think again.

Second-level teachers have 12 weeks off in summer, one week mid-term in October, two weeks at Christmas, one week February mid-term and two weeks at Easter. That adds up to 18 weeks, 4.5 months. No wonder we are weak at maths.

Here's another hard fact. A single public-sector worker, on €35,000, saw their after-tax salary cut by 4.17 per cent in the last Budget. A single private-sector worker, who earned €30,000 and was made redundant, saw their salary reduced by 61.7 per cent. Some 200,000 workers in the private sector have taken this kind of savage "cut".

No such awkward figures pop up in Fintan O'Toole's book. Nor did they surface in Pat Kenny's soft interview with the author. Indeed Kenny was almost as protective of Fintan as he was earlier of Neil Prendeville, presumably another paid-up member of the Radio Presenters' Privacy Society.

Specifics are the sign of good politics, generalities the sign of feel-good waffle. All RTE presenters are mad to talk about public sector reform in general but slow to get down to specifics. Why? Because RTE presenters consume big bowls of cream themselves.

More and more they act like FAS in the past. What business has the national broadcaster doing documentaries that promote books written for private profit by well-paid RTE personalities like Ryan Tubridy and David McCullough? To a writer in the private sector it smacks of a public-sector clique and an abuse of power.

To repeat: RTE runs away from the specifics of public-sector reform. Generalities yes, specifics no. We never hear how the majority of Irish people could be spared much misery if a minority of 300,000 public servants, bloated by benchmarking, were returned to the world of 2003.

Newstalk does not dodge that duty. Every day last week it let in light. Last Monday, Dr Ed Walsh specifically pointed to the 20 per cent pay gap between public and private pay, specifically called for his own pension to be cut, and specifically said that €7bn could be saved by benchmarking public pay to the same level as Northern Ireland.

Last Tuesday, Dr Eddie Molloy specifically surmised that some 5,000 employees of the HSE are really redundant, spending their time at meetings about meetings. Last Wednesday, Frank Fitzgibbon specifically told Damien Kiberd that the Croke Park deal was one of the main reasons the bond markets were bothered.

Fitzgibbon pointed to the fatal flaw. "The Government have effectively taken the major player out of the market and said you're not going to be affected by all this. We are just going to hit services instead of the people who are running the services."

Last Thursday: Paul Somerville, a market analyst, told us his colleagues in London were saying the same. "One thing they were absolutely bewildered about is how the Government could sign something like the Croke Park agreement when they knew they were going to have to be bringing in such drastic cuts at the end of the year."

Last Friday we heard the worst story of all. Ciaran Phelan of the Irish Brokers Association told George Hook that a government minister who serves 10 years is entitled to a pension of 60 per cent of their salary.

And he got down to specifics.

To fund such a pension in the private sector the minister would have to put in €35,000 per month. Yes, per month. And it's the same story across the public sector. But still RTE refuses to show us -- to adapt Galbraith -- the specific link between public wealth and private squalor.

RTE is always ready to report how awful it all is, or discuss public-sector reform in general. But it is reluctant to specifically show us how protecting public sector pay is making the lives of most people miserable. Why? Because RTE is part of the public sector racket

Any real journalists left in RTE should study last Friday's Graphic of the Week in The Irish Times. It's specific. It shows that while the public pay bill has doubled over the past decade, the pension bill has trebled.

This graphic forces a grim conclusion. We cannot afford the Croke Park deal. We cannot afford the current public sector. Anyone who avoids saying that is a waffler.

Let me leave you with this thought. Fintan O'Toole is to public-sector reform what John Lonergan is to prison reform. Work it out.


Deleted
 

ocoonassa

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Messages
6,124
The IMF is only good for the private banks that it works for.
I don't understand the IMF or how it comes to be threatening to take our sovereignty. I don't know either who voted for it to be able to do this, or why it didn't need a referendum as per the constitution, and I don't know who actually profits from its operation. Any takers?
 

kerdasi amaq

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 24, 2009
Messages
4,688
The Kildare Street Clown Gang voted to join the IMF without reading the fine print or understanding what they were signing up to, no doubt.
 

Odyessus

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2007
Messages
12,890
ENOUGH is enough. That's the title of Fintan O'Toole's book of aspirations for a new Ireland. Like my mother's aspirations -- Sweet Heart of Jesus, I place all my trust in Thee -- its pious platitudes are attempts to escape the problems of the real world.

Fintan sets out five aspirations; security, equality, education, health, citizenship. I could make a wish-list too. But I would feel a fraud if I failed to point out -- as Fintan fails --that all ambitions are hot air unless we cut public-sector pay and pensions back to 2003 levels.

The book sidles past this fundamental problem as if it were peripheral. The index does not even have an entry on it. No "public sector: scandal of" or even "reform of". It's like a book on Northern Ireland that never mentions religion.

Let me put a bush in that gap. The burden of public pay and pensions is the elephant in the room, the fattest of the fat cats, the problem that transcends all problems. As generalities are the enemy of good politics, let me explain why, using one euro, 100 cents, for clarity.

Out of every 100 cents it spends, the State spends 30 cents on public-service pay and pensions. Out of every 100 cents it takes in tax, it spends 60 on public-sector pay and pensions. The forthcoming Budget is fundamentally about wiping up whatever is little is left after the public-sector fat cats have finished their big bowl of cream.

The Budget will ask the poor, the sick and the old to pay for the paid, pensioned and the permanently employed. This is a scandal. The Government could find the €6bn it needs by simply cutting back public pay and pensions to 2003 levels. No tax hikes, no tormenting of old-age pensioners, no picking the pockets of the poor.

So why doesn't it do it? Because the political and media classes are afraid of the public sector. Last week the Dail and RTE were delighted to debate any distraction -- McDaid, Moriarty, Merkel -- anything except talk about the enormous elephant in the room, which is eating most of our resources.

Let me prove that. Mary Harney cannot cut into the 70 per cent of her health budget because it is marked for the pay and pensions. Mary Coughlan cannot cut into the 90 per cent of her education budget that is marked for teacher pay and pensions. Both will have to cut into the little that is left.

May I make myself really unpopular by pointing to a fat cat that is always full of self-pity? Irish teachers are the best paid in Europe. They also take the most holidays. If you think they take three months off in summer, think again.

Second-level teachers have 12 weeks off in summer, one week mid-term in October, two weeks at Christmas, one week February mid-term and two weeks at Easter. That adds up to 18 weeks, 4.5 months. No wonder we are weak at maths.

Here's another hard fact. A single public-sector worker, on €35,000, saw their after-tax salary cut by 4.17 per cent in the last Budget. A single private-sector worker, who earned €30,000 and was made redundant, saw their salary reduced by 61.7 per cent. Some 200,000 workers in the private sector have taken this kind of savage "cut".

No such awkward figures pop up in Fintan O'Toole's book. Nor did they surface in Pat Kenny's soft interview with the author. Indeed Kenny was almost as protective of Fintan as he was earlier of Neil Prendeville, presumably another paid-up member of the Radio Presenters' Privacy Society.

Specifics are the sign of good politics, generalities the sign of feel-good waffle. All RTE presenters are mad to talk about public sector reform in general but slow to get down to specifics. Why? Because RTE presenters consume big bowls of cream themselves.

More and more they act like FAS in the past. What business has the national broadcaster doing documentaries that promote books written for private profit by well-paid RTE personalities like Ryan Tubridy and David McCullough? To a writer in the private sector it smacks of a public-sector clique and an abuse of power.

To repeat: RTE runs away from the specifics of public-sector reform. Generalities yes, specifics no. We never hear how the majority of Irish people could be spared much misery if a minority of 300,000 public servants, bloated by benchmarking, were returned to the world of 2003.

Newstalk does not dodge that duty. Every day last week it let in light. Last Monday, Dr Ed Walsh specifically pointed to the 20 per cent pay gap between public and private pay, specifically called for his own pension to be cut, and specifically said that €7bn could be saved by benchmarking public pay to the same level as Northern Ireland.

Last Tuesday, Dr Eddie Molloy specifically surmised that some 5,000 employees of the HSE are really redundant, spending their time at meetings about meetings. Last Wednesday, Frank Fitzgibbon specifically told Damien Kiberd that the Croke Park deal was one of the main reasons the bond markets were bothered.

Fitzgibbon pointed to the fatal flaw. "The Government have effectively taken the major player out of the market and said you're not going to be affected by all this. We are just going to hit services instead of the people who are running the services."

Last Thursday: Paul Somerville, a market analyst, told us his colleagues in London were saying the same. "One thing they were absolutely bewildered about is how the Government could sign something like the Croke Park agreement when they knew they were going to have to be bringing in such drastic cuts at the end of the year."

Last Friday we heard the worst story of all. Ciaran Phelan of the Irish Brokers Association told George Hook that a government minister who serves 10 years is entitled to a pension of 60 per cent of their salary.

And he got down to specifics.

To fund such a pension in the private sector the minister would have to put in €35,000 per month. Yes, per month. And it's the same story across the public sector. But still RTE refuses to show us -- to adapt Galbraith -- the specific link between public wealth and private squalor.

RTE is always ready to report how awful it all is, or discuss public-sector reform in general. But it is reluctant to specifically show us how protecting public sector pay is making the lives of most people miserable. Why? Because RTE is part of the public sector racket

Any real journalists left in RTE should study last Friday's Graphic of the Week in The Irish Times. It's specific. It shows that while the public pay bill has doubled over the past decade, the pension bill has trebled.

This graphic forces a grim conclusion. We cannot afford the Croke Park deal. We cannot afford the current public sector. Anyone who avoids saying that is a waffler.

Let me leave you with this thought. Fintan O'Toole is to public-sector reform what John Lonergan is to prison reform. Work it out.

Hear hear. Well said. I would add we also have to get rid of the minimum wage and reduce welfare rates, both of which were grossly inflated by boom-time revenues, as well as bringing the lower-paid back into the income tax net, albeit at a modest rate.
 

chriskavo

Well-known member
Joined
May 28, 2010
Messages
2,641
Here is an interesting article by Webster tarpley from a couple of years back.

Secret Plan For IMF World Dictatorship

Webster Tarpley
November 12, 2008
G-20 Summit In DC On 11-15-8

The IMF orthodoxy is austerity, sacrifice, deregulation, privatization, union busting, wage reductions, free trade, the race to the bottom, and prohibitions on advanced technologies.from Oklahoma to the mythical Garden of Eden in the West.
This is a confidential strategy paper for the November 15 G-20 summit in Washington DC. This is not a new Bretton Woods in any sense, but rather a British-steered attempt to impose the dictatorship of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on the entire planet, wiping out all hope of economic recovery, the modernization of the developing countries, and national sovereignty at the same time.
Under this plan, the IMF would dictate the economic policies of all states. The IMF orthodoxy is austerity, sacrifice, deregulation, privatization, union busting, wage reductions, free trade, the race to the bottom, and prohibitions on advanced technologies. These policies would strangle humanity.
The Brazil-Russia-India-China bloc is reportedly objecting to putting so much power into the hands of the IMF, which is dominated by the US and the British, with Prime Minister Gordon Brown and Treasury Secretary Paulson of Goldman Sachs laying down the party line.
The new Chinese economic measures are the opposite of the bankers’ bailouts imposed so far in the wealthier countries. The Chinese will spend $585 billion on infrastructure, transportation, housing, and food production, with special attention to railroads, airports, and roads. The Chinese package is in the spirit of the Franklin D. Roosevelt New Deal, and it will maintain forward progress for China. The US $700 billion bailout and the UK and EU versions are a futile attempt to prop up the $1.5 quadrillion derivatives bubble. Sensible economic policy starts with wiping out the derivatives cancer.
A D V E R T I S E M E N T

The interest of humanity can only be served by preventing the Washington conference from carrying out the plan outlined below. If Russia, China, and the developing countries can mount an effective opposition, the world will divide into two blocs – a pro-derivatives, anti-production Malthusian-monetarist bloc, which will tend to fall behind because of its own policies; and, on the other hand, an anti-derivatives, pro-production bloc of nations seeking modern technology, and the full fruits of scienitific and economic progress. Persons of good will in all nations are encouraged to mobilize to make sure that their own country joins the pro-production, anti-derivatives bloc.
Preparations the for economic summit in Washington on November 15 are well advanced. Here are the five points which are currently on the agenda to be adopted by the invited heads of state. The overall philosophy is to continue globalization by reinforcing free trade and by creating a world economic government under the IMF.
The IMF Program Reads As Follows:
1) require the credit rating agencies to be registered and monitored and submit to rules of governance;
2) halt the principle of a convergence of accounting standards and re-examine the application of the fair market value rule in the financial field, so as to improve its coherence with the rules of prudence and conservatism;
3) to resolve that no market segment, territory, or financial institution shall escape from a proportionate and adequate regulation, or at the least, surveillance;
4) set up a code of conduct to avoid excessive risk-taking in the financial industry, including in the area of compensation. Supervisors will have to follow this code in evaluating the risk profiles of financial institutions;
5) to entrust to the IMF the primary responsibility, along with the FSF (Financial Stability Forum – Basel), to recommend the necessary measures to restore confidence and stability.
The IMF must be equipped with the essential resources and suitable instruments to support countries in difficulty, and to exert its role of macroeconomic surveillance to the fullest.
 

Odyessus

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2007
Messages
12,890
I don't understand the IMF or how it comes to be threatening to take our sovereignty. I don't know either who voted for it to be able to do this, or why it didn't need a referendum as per the constitution, and I don't know who actually profits from its operation. Any takers?

The IMF is not threatening to do anything. I have dealt with this on another thread. Stupid language like "IMF intervention" or "if the IMF come in" and so on, gives some people the impression that they are some kind of world dictators that can march into any country if they are not good and take over.

The IMF is an organisation set up to be a lender of last resort. If countries cannot borrow money elsewhere they can approach the IMF for a loan.

The IMF usually sets tough conditions for such loans, such as public service redundancies, welfare cuts, and/or other unpalatable measures. If a country doesn't like the conditions, it can go elsewhere for money.

However if a country could borrow at reasonable rates elsewhere, it wouldn't be going to the IMF in the first place.
 

Own Arris

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
699
In other words you don´t know - you´re a spoofer:roll:
Sailor here is an interesting article outlining the effect that the IMF has had in Nicaragua.

http://www.witnessforpeace.org/article.php?id=89



Given the IMFs record of strong arming states to sell off assets quickly and cheaply, for examples see Naomi Klein's 'Shock Doctrine', I fear that they would force a firesale of NAMA assets for a fraction of the price we paid for them. This would inevitably lead to a further collapse in house prices more negative equity etc. The middle classes have a lot to fear from the IDF.
 
Last edited:

kerdasi amaq

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 24, 2009
Messages
4,688
The reason the IMF are such scum, are the tough conditions they set for their loans.
 

AirTurbulence

Active member
Joined
Sep 14, 2010
Messages
286
I think IMF could be that very brutal reality check that a lot of shoppers loaded with bags in Dundrum (and the likes) need so badly. HOWEVER, it would be very naive to assume that IMF is going to chop Cowen & Co's wages/perks. These Irish "patricians" will be still getting paid as much in a year as many of us in many years combined (that is if we can hold on to the jobs we have). OR they (Cowen & Co) will source great money opportunities on the new "re-zoned" Irish economic market. It's at the time of greatest of calamities the largest amount of money are made - we all know that...
 

sport02

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2010
Messages
19,548
Was listening to the Russian economist on six one, can't think of his name of hand, but was saying the markets are reflecting an eight to nine billion budget adjustment this year, holy sh1t, maybe we need the IMF in, cut PS wages and slash PS jobs, cut old age pensions too.
 

ocoonassa

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Messages
6,124
The IMF is not threatening to do anything. I have dealt with this on another thread. Stupid language like "IMF intervention" or "if the IMF come in" and so on, gives some people the impression that they are some kind of world dictators that can march into any country if they are not good and take over.

The IMF is an organisation set up to be a lender of last resort. If countries cannot borrow money elsewhere they can approach the IMF for a loan.

The IMF usually sets tough conditions for such loans, such as public service redundancies, welfare cuts, and/or other unpalatable measures. If a country doesn't like the conditions, it can go elsewhere for money.

However if a country could borrow at reasonable rates elsewhere, it wouldn't be going to the IMF in the first place.
Thanks. They sound like an international loan shark.
 

chriskavo

Well-known member
Joined
May 28, 2010
Messages
2,641

kerdasi amaq

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 24, 2009
Messages
4,688

gatsbygirl20

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2008
Messages
22,551
The IMF would "nurture" nothing, just collect debt as painlessly as possible. The IMF are part of the "elite". They certainly have no interest in killing off "elites" per se.

All that "gutting" and "shutting down" and "cleaning out" you seem to be salivating over would involve real lives, real jobs (many low-paid) real human beings, real hardship, to add to all the rest of the hardship.

The IMF don't do hilarity. Maybe you find the prospect of people losing their jobs or having their salaries decimated "hilarious". I take it that you are convinced that the IMF axe will not fall on you, and that you find the prospect of others suffering, but not you, somewhat cheering.

Have a care. The very "middle class" and "taxpayers" you feel would benefit from IMF intervention, would of course be its victims. And so would you.[/QUOT


Sunday November 07 2010
ENOUGH is enough. That's the title of Fintan O'Toole's book of aspirations for a new Ireland. Like my mother's aspirations -- Sweet Heart of Jesus, I place all my trust in Thee -- its pious platitudes are attempts to escape the problems of the real world.

Fintan sets out five aspirations; security, equality, education, health, citizenship. I could make a wish-list too. But I would feel a fraud if I failed to point out -- as Fintan fails --that all ambitions are hot air unless we cut public-sector pay and pensions back to 2003 levels.

The book sidles past this fundamental problem as if it were peripheral. The index does not even have an entry on it. No "public sector: scandal of" or even "reform of". It's like a book on Northern Ireland that never mentions religion.

Let me put a bush in that gap. The burden of public pay and pensions is the elephant in the room, the fattest of the fat cats, the problem that transcends all problems. As generalities are the enemy of good politics, let me explain why, using one euro, 100 cents, for clarity.

Out of every 100 cents it spends, the State spends 30 cents on public-service pay and pensions. Out of every 100 cents it takes in tax, it spends 60 on public-sector pay and pensions. The forthcoming Budget is fundamentally about wiping up whatever is little is left after the public-sector fat cats have finished their big bowl of cream.

The Budget will ask the poor, the sick and the old to pay for the paid, pensioned and the permanently employed. This is a scandal. The Government could find the €6bn it needs by simply cutting back public pay and pensions to 2003 levels. No tax hikes, no tormenting of old-age pensioners, no picking the pockets of the poor.

So why doesn't it do it? Because the political and media classes are afraid of the public sector. Last week the Dail and RTE were delighted to debate any distraction -- McDaid, Moriarty, Merkel -- anything except talk about the enormous elephant in the room, which is eating most of our resources.

Let me prove that. Mary Harney cannot cut into the 70 per cent of her health budget because it is marked for the pay and pensions. Mary Coughlan cannot cut into the 90 per cent of her education budget that is marked for teacher pay and pensions. Both will have to cut into the little that is left.

May I make myself really unpopular by pointing to a fat cat that is always full of self-pity? Irish teachers are the best paid in Europe. They also take the most holidays. If you think they take three months off in summer, think again.

Second-level teachers have 12 weeks off in summer, one week mid-term in October, two weeks at Christmas, one week February mid-term and two weeks at Easter. That adds up to 18 weeks, 4.5 months. No wonder we are weak at maths.

Here's another hard fact. A single public-sector worker, on €35,000, saw their after-tax salary cut by 4.17 per cent in the last Budget. A single private-sector worker, who earned €30,000 and was made redundant, saw their salary reduced by 61.7 per cent. Some 200,000 workers in the private sector have taken this kind of savage "cut".

No such awkward figures pop up in Fintan O'Toole's book. Nor did they surface in Pat Kenny's soft interview with the author. Indeed Kenny was almost as protective of Fintan as he was earlier of Neil Prendeville, presumably another paid-up member of the Radio Presenters' Privacy Society.

Specifics are the sign of good politics, generalities the sign of feel-good waffle. All RTE presenters are mad to talk about public sector reform in general but slow to get down to specifics. Why? Because RTE presenters consume big bowls of cream themselves.

More and more they act like FAS in the past. What business has the national broadcaster doing documentaries that promote books written for private profit by well-paid RTE personalities like Ryan Tubridy and David McCullough? To a writer in the private sector it smacks of a public-sector clique and an abuse of power.

To repeat: RTE runs away from the specifics of public-sector reform. Generalities yes, specifics no. We never hear how the majority of Irish people could be spared much misery if a minority of 300,000 public servants, bloated by benchmarking, were returned to the world of 2003.

Newstalk does not dodge that duty. Every day last week it let in light. Last Monday, Dr Ed Walsh specifically pointed to the 20 per cent pay gap between public and private pay, specifically called for his own pension to be cut, and specifically said that €7bn could be saved by benchmarking public pay to the same level as Northern Ireland.

Last Tuesday, Dr Eddie Molloy specifically surmised that some 5,000 employees of the HSE are really redundant, spending their time at meetings about meetings. Last Wednesday, Frank Fitzgibbon specifically told Damien Kiberd that the Croke Park deal was one of the main reasons the bond markets were bothered.

Fitzgibbon pointed to the fatal flaw. "The Government have effectively taken the major player out of the market and said you're not going to be affected by all this. We are just going to hit services instead of the people who are running the services."

Last Thursday: Paul Somerville, a market analyst, told us his colleagues in London were saying the same. "One thing they were absolutely bewildered about is how the Government could sign something like the Croke Park agreement when they knew they were going to have to be bringing in such drastic cuts at the end of the year."

Last Friday we heard the worst story of all. Ciaran Phelan of the Irish Brokers Association told George Hook that a government minister who serves 10 years is entitled to a pension of 60 per cent of their salary.

And he got down to specifics.

To fund such a pension in the private sector the minister would have to put in €35,000 per month. Yes, per month. And it's the same story across the public sector. But still RTE refuses to show us -- to adapt Galbraith -- the specific link between public wealth and private squalor.

RTE is always ready to report how awful it all is, or discuss public-sector reform in general. But it is reluctant to specifically show us how protecting public sector pay is making the lives of most people miserable. Why? Because RTE is part of the public sector racket

Any real journalists left in RTE should study last Friday's Graphic of the Week in The Irish Times. It's specific. It shows that while the public pay bill has doubled over the past decade, the pension bill has trebled.

This graphic forces a grim conclusion. We cannot afford the Croke Park deal. We cannot afford the current public sector. Anyone who avoids saying that is a waffler.

Let me leave you with this thought. Fintan O'Toole is to public-sector reform what John Lonergan is to prison reform. Work it out.
For some reason this Eoghan Harris rant from the Sindo has got mixed in with my reply, due to a poster not understanding the "quote" function. Harris was at the same anti-PS rant last year---why should the PS be protected, they need to share the "bowl of cream" etc. Then, in obedience to Eoghan's demands, the PS took 2 substantial paycuts. Does Harris mention this? Has the PS paycuts of last year registered with anybody in the Sindo? No of course not. We are back to the same old drum beating, now that December is rolling round again.


Harris thinks the PS is still "bloated with benchmarking". The 2 paycuts more than reversed benchmarking. His manipulating of statistics is pure Harris, (a private sector worker "saw their salary reduced by 61.7 per cent". No Eoghan, they lost their job, far too serious a catastrophe for you to play infant sums with. Presumably the dole is meant to make up the remainder you quote. Stop comparing the "pay" of those who are not working with the pay of those who are. Losing your job is far more serious than taking a paycut, but stop using the former as a stick to beat the latter.)


At least Eoghan does not pretend that "frontline" workers matter. His loathing of teachers is refreshing if hardly unique. What would an anti-PS rant be like without having a go at the People's Enemy, the teachers?

Every teacher that is, except the Limerick Loon, Dr Ed Walsh, of course. Docter Ed wishes someone would "take his pension" away from him. Give it to me, Dr Ed. I have no pension, like many PS workers. Dr ED wants us to "benchmark public pay to Northern Ireland". Great stuff from the good doctor. Let's benchmark everything to Northern Ireland prices, starting with creche fees and moving on to doctors' visits, and dental fees..

Harris uses as typical of the public sector pension bill, a Minister who retires after 10 years on 60% of his salary. Of course this is madness. But how many ordinary public servants can retire after 10 years on 60% of pay? None. Ever. Selective again Eoghan. Which is why it would take "35k a month to fund such a pension in the private sector". That gob-smacking statistic only applies to a government minister who retires after 10 years. But no doubt we will hear it quoted as the norm in the PS. Job done, Eoghan.

Harris's bi-polar pendulum is in one of its cyclical swings against the PS. Sunday after Sunday expect the same rant, ably laced with references to the great private sector ethos of Aristotle, Plato and Burke. It certainly worked last year...
 

johndodger

Well-known member
Joined
May 5, 2010
Messages
1,845
You claimed that the IMF would close down hospitals and schools en masse and you went on to say that this is their modus operandi. So, I ask again, where have they done this?
I refer you to Dredger (thank you Dredger).

Would you really actually welcome the IMF in without doing any basic research?
 

dpbdpb

Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2010
Messages
76
I don't understand this fetish some people seem to have for the IMF. An organisation that should be declared illegal under the Offences Against The State Act.​

YouTube - (Jamaica) IMF decimating one country after another
24,966

We can solve our problems by printing money​
.
I have worked in Jamaica and the amounts of corruption and bureauacy is ridiculous.

The IMFs role is to give money to countries when no one else will lend to them, countries dont want to invite them in.

If they are going to lend you money they need to see that the its not just adding to the debt pile - they try and make the country make genuine reforms to live within its means.
 

bormotello

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2008
Messages
12,364
I refer you to Dredger (thank you Dredger).

Would you really actually welcome the IMF in without doing any basic research?
FF is dead and now we have two choices
According to Labour it will be extra 8 Bn taxes ( 4K-6K extra for middle income family) to preserve pay levels in public sector in exchange for crap public services(closed hospitals, bigger classes size, no capital investment at all)
Or we can get exactly the same crap with ruined public services, but significantly cheaper
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top