A Genius Dies



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A sad loss; also a reminder of the sexis past of maths, when Sophie Germain had to pretend to be male in her correspondence in order to garner any credibility with correspondents. She was foundational in the field of elasticity. She died untainted by even an honorary degree. I think that after a considerable fight her name was eventually included in the names of thinkers on the Eiffel Tower.
 
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Deleted member 45466

A sad loss; also a reminder of the sexis past of maths, when Sophie Germain had to pretend to be male in her correspondence in order to garner any credibility with correspondents. She was foundational in the field of elasticity. She died untainted by even an honorary degree. I think that after a considerable fight her name was eventually included in the names of thinkers on the Eiffel Tower.
:confused:

Knicker elasticity perhaps.
 
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No Irish winners of the Fields Medal, no surprise with the disregard the Irish Establishment have for maths and science.

This Russian mathematician is the only person to decline the Fields Medal. He also declined another award that would have come with a million dollars.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grigori_Perelman
That is a ridiculous level of personal integrity.

It reminds me of the story about the Hungarian mathematician Paul Erdős, who was with a colleague when they encounter a homeless man looking for money. Erdős took out his wallet, paused in thought for some time and then handed the beggar most of the money in his wallet. His colleague asked him afterwards why the delay before handing over such a generous gift. Erdős replied that he had been working out precisely how much money he himself would need until the next payday; everything else was surplus and could be given away.
 

Sister Mercedes

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Mathematician humor:

Q: What does the 'B' in Benoit B Mandelbrot stand for?

A: Benoit B Mandelbrot
 
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Deleted member 45466

She created the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a "computing machine". She's considered the forerunner of the computer programmer.
What?! :shock:

Charles Babbage, Pascal and numerous other mathematicians had already conceived the computer and computer program.

Shewer, she made a contribution, but stop telling lies by portraying her as the inventor of the computer program.
 
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She created the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a "computing machine". She's considered the forerunner of the computer programmer.
Exactly. In its modern understanding the term goes to the 19th century understanding which she presented.

I've written code in Ada way back when. Pretty high level and almost human language.
 
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Deleted member 45466

Plus ça change . . .
You're making her out to be something that she was not. The mathematics of elasticity had been studied by Hooke, Newton, Gauss, Young, Cauchy, all of whom made far more contributions then Germain.

You're revising history to fit a feminist narrative.
 
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What?! :shock:

Charles Babbage, Pascal and numerous other mathematicians had already conceived the computer and computer program.

Shewer, she made a contribution, but stop telling lies by portraying her as the inventor of the computer program.
Augusta Ada King-Noel, Countess of Lovelace (née Byron; 10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852) was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's proposed mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. She was the first to recognise that the machine had applications beyond pure calculation, and created the first algorithm intended to be carried out by such a machine. As a result, she is often regarded as the first to recognise the full potential of a "computing machine" and the first computer programmer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_Lovelace

She was very closely associated with Babbage and is considered to have written the first computer programme.
 

Sister Mercedes

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What?! :shock:

Charles Babbage, Pascal and numerous other mathematicians had already conceived the computer and computer program.

Shewer, she made a contribution, but stop telling lies by portraying her as the inventor of the computer program.
She worked with Babbage.

Augusta Ada King-Noel, Countess of Lovelace (née Byron; 10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852) was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's proposed mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. She was the first to recognise that the machine had applications beyond pure calculation, and created the first algorithm intended to be carried out by such a machine. As a result, she is often regarded as the first to recognise the full potential of a "computing machine" and the first computer programmer.
 
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Deleted member 45466

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_Lovelace

She was very closely associated with Babbage and is considered to have written the first computer programme.


All but one of the programs cited in her notes had been prepared by Babbage from three to seven years earlier. The exception was prepared by Babbage for her, although she did detect a 'bug' in it. Not only is there no evidence that Ada ever prepared a program for the Analytical Engine, but her correspondence with Babbage shows that she did not have the knowledge to do so.


Hmmmm.
 
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You're making her out to be something that she was not. The mathematics of elasticity had been studied by Hooke, Newton, Gauss, Young, Cauchy, all of whom made far more contributions then Germain.

You're revising history to fit a feminist narrative.
Did I say that she created the field?

Did I say that she alone was responsible for all discoveries in that field?

Her achievements were towering and achieved in the face of institutional sexism which ran as far as exclusion.

Your knee-jerk reaction is both petty and revealing of your mindset.
 
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Deleted member 45466

Strange, I was expecting Gender Quota Ger, and Bead Rattling Ripley to turn this one into a feminist tirade.

Anyway, I think the worst thing about yer wan's death is her age. 40 is nothing.

Lovely looking woman btw.
 
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Deleted member 45466

Did I say that she created the field?

Did I say that she alone was responsible for all discoveries in that field?

Her achievements were towering and achieved in the face of institutional sexism which ran as far as exclusion.

Your knee-jerk reaction is both petty and revealing of your mindset.
Her achievements were not "towering", and she received supported from male mathematicians (including Gauss - now we're talking towering).

Go and have a glass of milk and and a jam sandwich Des.
 
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All but one of the programs cited in her notes had been prepared by Babbage from three to seven years earlier. The exception was prepared by Babbage for her, although she did detect a 'bug' in it. Not only is there no evidence that Ada ever prepared a program for the Analytical Engine, but her correspondence with Babbage shows that she did not have the knowledge to do so.


Hmmmm.
Nice. You cite one side of the controversy. It's fair to say that I didn't refer to it at all, but it is also fair to say that there is evidence that she had written algorithms and doubly fair to say that she saw beyond the limited vision of what Babbage was doing and predicted a far greater flexibility and potential for the differential engine.
 


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