A new diabetes classification.

Ardillaun

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Scandinavian researchers have taken a deep look at multiple metabolic markers in diabetes mellitus and have come up with a new classification of the disease into 'clusters'. Welcome to a new world of SAID, SIDD, SIRD, MOD and MARD:

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/mar/01/five-categories-for-adult-diabetes-not-just-type-1-and-type-2-study-shows

http://time.com/5183350/diabetes-five-types/

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321097.php

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/893305

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(18)30051-2/fulltext

They sound like associates of Dinsdale and the Kray twins. I think the old type 1 is called SAID here and type 2 is split four ways. The two of the old type 2 group that are aggressive are SIDD and SIRD.

Needless to say, all this will have to be confirmed by other groups but it looks like those at high-risk of eye and kidney damage can be more efficiently targeted ahead of time, so a possibly significant advance. Let's hope a few people who know something about this topic chime in.
 
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GDPR

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I read about that today and have been trying to work out which classification I am in. I am Type 2 but it seems the new classifications blur a bit between T1 and T2 (that's what the article I read said).

All I can do is keep it under control and hopefully avoid blindness and kidney failure and nerve damage and leave the specialists to decide what type of diabetes I have.

It's not just sugar intake that needs to be controlled but fat too as it can get into one's eyes and cause macular damage.

I think the world will eventually be adopting a low-fat vegan diet and be much happier and healthier.
 

General Urko

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I read about that today and have been trying to work out which classification I am in. I am Type 2 but it seems the new classifications blur a bit between T1 and T2 (that's what the article I read said).

All I can do is keep it under control and hopefully avoid blindness and kidney failure and nerve damage and leave the specialists to decide what type of diabetes I have.

It's not just sugar intake that needs to be controlled but fat too as it can get into one's eyes and cause macular damage.

I think the world will eventually be adopting a low-fat vegan diet and be much happier and healthier.
I hope things work out for you, the prospect of getting it terrifies me as my diet is shyte!
 

razorblade

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I hope things work out for you, the prospect of getting it terrifies me as my diet is shyte!
Just try to eat a more balanced diet and manage to keep your weight under control and you shouldn't have too much problems unlike type 1 which you tend to be born with type 2 is by and large lifestyle related and can be avoided by adapting a healthier lifestyle and not being overweight.
 

GDPR

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Just try to eat a more balanced diet and manage to keep your weight under control and you shouldn't have too much problems unlike type 1 which you tend to be born with type 2 is by and large lifestyle related and can be avoided by adapting a healthier lifestyle and not being overweight.
And T2 can be reversed for some people. Change your diet.
 

Ardillaun

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I'd say the doctors will be barraged with questions next week. The findings suggest that HbA1c will be one of several prognostic factors that physicians look at in the future to fine tune treatment. A lot of patients will be in the poor prognosis groups and may require more intensive monitoring of, say, urinary protein and kidney function or retinopathy.
 
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Analyzer

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So basically.....they have been getting it wrong for years.....

I think that there is too much emphasis on diet, and not enough on activity level.

And note - sitting on a couch in front of a television, or sitting in a pub, watching spectator sports does not count as ACTIVITY !!!!

Television and the media are relentlessly pushing the diet thing, but if you go to any medic, you will be told the problem is the Irish combination of inactivity and binge boozing.

Well....TV and the news media will not lambast this....because they are paid to tell us to...."support our advertising sponsors".
 

GDPR

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So basically.....they have been getting it wrong for years.....

I think that there is too much emphasis on diet, and not enough on activity level.

And note - sitting on a couch in front of a television, or sitting in a pub, watching spectator sports does not count as ACTIVITY !!!!

Television and the media are relentlessly pushing the diet thing, but if you go to any medic, you will be told the problem is the Irish combination of inactivity and binge boozing.

Well....TV and the news media will not lambast this....because they are paid to tell us to...."support our advertising sponsors".
Clearly you don't have diabetes. Diet is really the most important factor in Type 2 diabetes, though exercise helps to control it and avoid it. However, if you exercise a lot and keep up the excessive sugar and fat intake you can still get diabetes and not maintain the sugar levels once you have it. Exercise is secondary, I'm afraid.

Here's a relevant article:
The Key to Weight Loss Is Diet Quality, Not Quantity, a New Study Finds

[A] new study, published Tuesday in JAMA, … found that people who cut back on added sugar, refined grains and highly processed foods while concentrating on eating plenty of vegetables and whole foods — without worrying about counting calories or limiting portion sizes — lost significant amounts of weight over the course of a year.

The strategy worked for people whether they followed diets that were mostly low in fat or mostly low in carbohydrates. And their success did not appear to be influenced by their genetics or their insulin-response to carbohydrates, a finding that casts doubt on the increasingly popular idea that different diets should be recommended to people based on their DNA makeup or on their tolerance for carbs or fat.

The research lends strong support to the notion that diet quality, not quantity, is what helps people lose and manage their weight most easily in the long run. It also suggests that health authorities should shift away from telling the public to obsess over calories and instead encourage Americans to avoid processed foods that are made with refined starches and added sugar, like bagels, white bread, refined flour and sugary snacks and beverages, said Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, a cardiologist and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.
 

benroe

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There is good news for those with Type 1 diabetes, especially those looking after children with it, from April Abbots Freestyle libre sub-dermal sensor and reader will be available on the long term illness book, we have been paying 165 euro a month for it since our daughter was diagnosed 2 years ago.
 

Mushroom

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Clearly you don't have diabetes. Diet is really the most important factor in Type 2 diabetes, though exercise helps to control it and avoid it. However, if you exercise a lot and keep up the excessive sugar and fat intake you can still get diabetes and not maintain the sugar levels once you have it. Exercise is secondary, I'm afraid.

I have found the switch from lager and cider to good red wine and decent 10 year old Irish/Scotch (allied to improving my daily diet and an increase in daily exercise), to be very beneficial. My HbA1c has consistently hovered around the 6.9 level since I switched my booze.

The other measure sees me around 41 mmol, but I haven't a clue about what that means. I think it's reasonably OK though.
 

GDPR

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There is good news for those with Type 1 diabetes, especially those looking after children with it, from April Abbots Freestyle libre sub-dermal sensor and reader will be available on the long term illness book, we have been paying 165 euro a month for it since our daughter was diagnosed 2 years ago.
I read recently even better news for Type 1 sufferers: a cure for it. But it won't be ready for a few years yet so in the meantime that sensor will be really useful.

Type 2 people generally ate themselves into the illness and they should pay the penalty by stopping the sugar and the fat intakes.
 

GDPR

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I have found the switch from lager and cider to good red wine and decent 10 year old Irish/Scotch (allied to improving my daily diet and an increase in daily exercise), to be very beneficial. My HbA1c has consistently hovered around the 6.9 level since I switched my booze.

The other measure sees me around 41 mmol, but I haven't a clue about what that means. I think it's reasonably OK though.
I am not sure if you are using the US measure or the European/UK one. If it's the latter then 41 is massively high. You should be 7.0 or less.
 

Mushroom

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Type 2 people generally ate themselves into the illness and they should pay the penalty by stopping the sugar and the fat intakes.
Fully agree with that.
 

Mushroom

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I am not sure if you are using the US measure or the European/UK one. If it's the latter then 41 is massively high.

You should be 7.0 or less.
That's why I mentioned 6.9!
 

GDPR

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That's why I mentioned 6.9!
Just checked an indicator from diabetes.co.uk and you have got the numbers the wrong way around: 42 in HbA1c is around 7.0 in mmol/L.

You have your diabetes well under control!
 
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gatsbygirl20

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Just checked an indicator from diabetes.co.uk and you have got the numbers the wrong way around: 42 in HbA1c is around 7.0 in mmol/L.

You have your diabetes well under control!
Is 7 not a bit high? Is that the fasting number or after eating?

My blood sugar drops dramatically after exercise. Nothing else seems to work so well
 

GDPR

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Is 7 not a bit high? Is that the fasting number or after eating?

My blood sugar drops dramatically after exercise. Nothing else seems to work so well
7 is OK for diabetics for fasting level.

I noticed after cycling that my blood sugar drops dramatically too.

Another thing I discovered is to have a much longer fasting period, so stop eating before 20:00 (no midnight snacks!) then having brekky at 8:00. That gives the body 12 hours of rest. If you can have dinner earlier, then the longer the fast period.
 

silverharp

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7 is OK for diabetics for fasting level.

I noticed after cycling that my blood sugar drops dramatically too.

Another thing I discovered is to have a much longer fasting period, so stop eating before 20:00 (no midnight snacks!) then having brekky at 8:00. That gives the body 12 hours of rest. If you can have dinner earlier, then the longer the fast period.
you should look up intermittent fasting, i dont know if it has any relevance for diabetes but the period it works on 16 hours.
 


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