'A Shameful History' - Illegitimacy between WWI & the Swinging 60s in the Great Britain

Catalpast

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Well folks some people have certainly worked themselves into a lather over the way we treated illegitimate children and their Mothers in Dear ol Catholic Ireland in the past

All the fault of the Catholic Church apparently.....

Yet when we look across the Water at our nearest neighbour [last a Catholic Country in the 16th Century] we see that the fate of unmarried mothers and their offspring was none too rosy over there either!

Perhaps the Anti Catholic Bigots here can rationally explain this Anomaly?

In the Family Way: Illegitimacy between the Great War and the Swinging Sixties review – a shameful history

Jane Robinson tells the stories of unmarried mothers sent to the workhouse, their children into care, in a painful chapter of our nation’s history.


The 1913 Mental Deficiency Act, enabling unmarried mothers to be categorised as “moral imbeciles” and sent to lunatic asylums, was only repealed in 1959. It was not until 1987 that the concept of “illegitimacy” was abolished in law and in 1968, in the age of the Beatles and the contraceptive pill, there were 12,993 illegitimate babies given up for adoption by women unable to face the stigma of unmarried motherhood.
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jan/25/in-the-family-way-jane-robinson-shameful-history-illegitimacy
 


derryman

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The common factor is religion.
Did I see the goalposts move there? I think I did.

Not only England but America Australia and all of the western nations. The common factor being that Religion was the only institution who made any attempt to provide for the unfortunate. And the state absconded its duties in many social needs.
 

Merovingian

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As an atheist I can say that in the past we outsourced the provision for unmarried mothers to the Church and now we can outsource our shame to them too. Win-win..what's not to like!
 

GDPR

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The Common Factor is Economics

- as any Red Blooded Marxist could tell you...:)
I have pointed out many times on here. The Industrial Schools, etc were a product of Whig England rather than Catholicism. However people have emotional needs.
 

Fr. Hank Tree

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That's the origin but it doesn't explain the persistence of those institutions well into the 20th century. The explanation for that is much more complicated than simply blaming religion and the church but as someone above put it, why feel shame when you can outsource it.
 

GDPR

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That's the origin but it doesn't explain the persistence of those institutions well into the 20th century. The explanation for that is much more complicated than simply blaming religion and the church but as someone above put it, why feel shame when you can outsource it.
I think there are various factors- the Church Hierarchy is to blame in part for it's neurotic anti-Communism/Socialism, than there is the fact that Dublin was the "Red Light" capital of Europe prior to semi-independence and all the trauma and shame that caused.
 

paddycomeback

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I have pointed out many times on here. The Industrial Schools, etc were a product of Whig England rather than Catholicism. However people have emotional needs.
But that doesn't suit the narrative. Irish = Catholic = Mad = Troublemaker.
English = Protestant = Sensible = Born to Rule.
 

PBP voter

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But that doesn't suit the narrative. Irish = Catholic = Mad = Troublemaker.
English = Protestant = Sensible = Born to Rule.
11 million Brits have a criminal record.

In the 70s 1 in 4 young men between 16-25 had a conviction.
 

GDPR

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The first mother/child homes in Ireland were CoI.
But the strange thing is that stigma around illegitimacy didn't exist to nearly the same extent among both working class and small farming Ulster Prods and Gaels as it existed in the South.
 

silverharp

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at the same time when council became obliged to house these single mothers in the late 60's it accelerated the social decay when their sprogs grew up to be delinquents the kids had much better chances in life being adopted on to families that could look after them properly
 

parentheses

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I think there are various factors- the Church Hierarchy is to blame in part for it's neurotic anti-Communism/Socialism, than there is the fact that Dublin was the "Red Light" capital of Europe prior to semi-independence and all the trauma and shame that caused.
Plus the fact 20% of the Irish population died in the famine. English commentators blamed the Irish for "feckless breeding".
 

Toland

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Did I see the goalposts move there? I think I did.

Not only England but America Australia and all of the western nations. The common factor being that Religion was the only institution who made any attempt to provide for the unfortunate. And the state absconded its duties in many social needs.
"to abscond" is not a transitive verb, and doesn't mean what you think it means.

Religion is not an institution and is not a proper noun, and so needs no capitalisation.

You're welcome.

If you mean that a number of religious institutions saw a gap in the "charities" market and exploited it for all they were worth, then you might have a point.
 

GDPR

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If you mean that a number of religious institutions saw a gap in the "charities" market and exploited it for all they were worth, then you might have a point.
I have known very many not just Catholics but Protestant and various types of "Eastern" Christians- and nearly all of them have a strong sense of social duty which is far removed from the cynicism that you are implying.
 

derryman

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"to abscond" is not a transitive verb, and doesn't mean what you think it means.

Religion is not an institution and is not a proper noun, and so needs no capitalisation.

You're welcome.

If you mean that a number of religious institutions saw a gap in the "charities" market and exploited it for all they were worth, then you might have a point.
You know what I mean and your reference to gaps in markets is I thought beneath even you , but apparently you are lower than I had thought.
 

GDPR

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Cattlepriest still trying to argue that Ireland was in no way different from Britain at the same period and probably better thanks to the kindness of the Holy Catholic Church?
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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The other lads did it too, is the lamest excuse of them all.
 

Dame_Enda

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As I've said before the Irish church was heavily influenced by Victorian moral codes as it only became legal in 1829. just 8 years before Victoria came to the throne. I would point out that that Liberal govt depended on the Irish Party to remain in power. There was also a repressive law passed in 1907 regarding women under the Campbell Bannerman Liberal government that had a big majority.

It's also a fact that when we left the UK the money for social services disappeared too and the govt took the easy way out by outsourcing them to the Church.
 


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