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A Tale of grubby old Ireland.


Truth.ie

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Messages
28,077
Tragic story of a couple who bought their dream retreat on Tory Island (off Donegal) in the early 80's having spent many years visiting the place.
Neville Presho quit his career in the 70's to make a film on Tory Island.
He loved the people, the lifestyle, and the simplicity of the island.
They bought, (I assume) on a romantic whim, rather than for an investment of to flip (hate that term).
Then in 1993, whilst working in New Zealand they received a phone call that someone had offered a pitiful 1000 punts to buy their home.
They rightly refused, then roughly a month later their home was burnt down.
Then a few months later, they received a letter from Donegal Council telling them their house was in a bad state and asked what were they going to do with it. (Is this standard procedure?)
Then 3 months after the Donegal Council letter, the house was razed to the ground. It's not mentioned by whom.
The stress of this ordeal is blamed for the poor man having a nervous breakdown, and also was a factor in the break-up of his marriage.
BBC News - The tale of the 'vanishing house' on Tory Island
Timeline:
House bought in 1982.
Offer refused in 1993.
Burnt down a month later.
Donegal Council send strange letter April 1994.
House disappears between April and July 1994.


What a grubby, little country.
 

Eire1976

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2010
Messages
14,190
Tragic story of a couple who bought their dream retreat on Tory Island (off Donegal) in the early 80's having spent many years visiting the place.
Neville Presho quit his career in the 70's to make a film on Tory Island.
He loved the people, the lifestyle, and the simplicity of the island.
They bought, (I assume) on a romantic whim, rather than for an investment of to flip (hate that term).
Then in 1993, whilst working in New Zealand they received a phone call that someone had offered a pitiful 1000 punts to buy their home.
They rightly refused, then roughly a month later their home was burnt down.
Then a few months later, they received a letter from Donegal Council telling them their house was in a bad state and asked what were they going to do with it. (Is this standard procedure?)
Then 3 months after the Donegal Council letter, the house was razed to the ground. It's not mentioned by whom.
The stress of this ordeal is blamed for the poor man having a nervous breakdown, and also was a factor in the break-up of his marriage.
BBC News - The tale of the 'vanishing house' on Tory Island
Timeline:
House bought in 1982.
Offer refused in 1993.
Burnt down a month later.
Donegal Council send strange letter April 1994.
House disappears between April and July 1994.


What a grubby, little country.

What sort of a response are you looking for?
 

Marcos the black

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
18,708
Yeah, the whole country deserves to be tarred with the one brush over this isolated incident. And nothing like this ever happens in any other part of the world. It's only in Ireland. Grubby grubby Ireland.. And don't get me started about the weather.. Oh, be jaysus....
 

EvotingMachine0197

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Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
8,629
I remember hearing about this maybe ten years ago.

Regarding the Council letter, I think Councils can initiate these proceedings under the Dereliction Act, iirc.
 

Warrior of Destiny

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Joined
Sep 24, 2010
Messages
2,503
Yeah, the whole country deserves to be tarred with the one brush over this isolated incident. And nothing like this ever happens in any other part of the world. It's only in Ireland. Grubby grubby Ireland.. And don't get me started about the weather.. Oh, be jaysus....
Leave him be in his little world of fear and 'the man'.
 

gatsbygirl20

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2008
Messages
22,790
Edna O'Brien in her recent memoir describes an allegedly similar resentment on the part of some neighbours when she built a house in Donegal facing the sea....

I cannot just find the reference....
 

Asparagus

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Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
4,882
Come on - if my holiday house was burned down i'd be upset, but the insurance would pay the mortgage and get me some of the stuff back - i'd have to be some tool to let it ruin my life.
“You must take into account that this talented film-maker underwent a personal tragedy and since the house was destroyed he cannot work anymore,” he said.
In fact you'd have to say i'd probably have used the situation to retrospectively justify any feck up i had made of my life.

And then you'd call me a grubby man.

But Donegal does strange things to people... especially Gardai.
 

sondagefaux

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Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
15,682
Another 'Ireland is the worst country in the world' thread?

Puh-leeze.

For starters, it's Wales where there was an organised campaign of burning down holiday homes.

The OP should also read up about Spain and how foreigners who buy homes are regularly fleeced out of their properties, frequently illegally built but with the active connivance of local authorities.

During the good times when new developments were shooting up along Spanish coastlines faster than bamboo, thousands of British and other European nationals invested in Spanish properties. Many were retirees who spent their nest eggs on apartments and villas hoping that they could spend their twilight years in a sunny bolt hole, the reward for a life time’s hard slog. Unbeknown to hordes of British investors, the homes they bought in good faith turned out to be illegally built by unscrupulous developers aided and abetted by corrupt local councils and lawyers. The problem was further compounded by poorly enforced planning legislation. Building permits were issued by councils illegally and when the scale of the problem was revealed, regional governments were quick to react.
http://my.telegraph.co.uk/expat/annanicholas/10147439/british-homeowners-of-illegal-spanish-properties-still-petitioning-eu-for-justice/
 

Colin M

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Joined
Jul 23, 2012
Messages
5,356
What I have found here is, the more western the county, the less the locals like the 'outsiders'. Unless it is the outsiders of tourists, who provide a bit of local revenue for a few months every year.
 

Marcos the black

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Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
18,708
What I have found here is, the more western the county, the less the locals like the 'outsiders'. Unless it is the outsiders of tourists, who provide a bit of local revenue for a few months every year.
Really? Based on one case? Ever hear of a property dispute in Dublin?
On another issue is the Frontline on next Monday night?
 

Colin M

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Joined
Jul 23, 2012
Messages
5,356
Really? Based on one case? Ever hear of a property dispute in Dublin?
On another issue is the Frontline on next Monday night?
I am serious. People from the counties next to the Atlantic Ocean are much more 'proud', from my experience, and more conservative (in the Irish way), I would add. The younger, more liberal people tend to leave for Dublin, or the likes of London and New York, and usually don't come back.

I know this attitude very well, given my mother's side of the family hail from one of these counties.


For example, have you ever met a Cork person who does NOT talk about Cork, after a short while? :)
 
Last edited:

Marcos the black

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Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
18,708
I am serious. People from the counties next to the Atlantic Ocean are much more 'proud', from my experience, and more conservative (in the Irish way), I would add. I know this attitude very well, given my mother's side of the family hail from one of these counties.

For example, have you ever met a Cork person who does NOT talk about Cork, after a short while? :)
Or a Dublin person who doesn't talk about Dublin....
Or a Kilkenny person who doesn't talk about Kilkenny...
Or a French person who doesn't talk about France....

Etc ad nauseum...
 

sondagefaux

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
15,682
I am serious. People from the counties next to the Atlantic Ocean are much more 'proud', from my experience, and more conservative (in the Irish way), I would add. The younger, more liberal people tend to leave for Dublin, or the likes of London and New York, and usually don't come back.

I know this attitude very well, given my mother's side of the family hail from one of these counties.


For example, have you ever met a Cork person who does NOT talk about Cork, after a short while? :)
Are you seriously claiming that Cork city is broadly the same as Donegal when it comes to social attitudes to 'outsiders' or conservative social views?

What about Galway city, which in my experience is one of the most cosmopolitan and socially liberal places in Ireland?
 

Grumpy Jack

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Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
6,090
This is old news - Mr Presho sued the hotel owner and won damages in the High Court.

Film-maker wins

Irish film-maker Neville Presho was one of those fortunate to have a 19th-century stone house on the island - or so he thought. When he returned to the Atlantic island in 1994 after living in New Zealand for six years, he found his home missing and a hotel car park in its place.

Today, Presho was awarded €60,000 (£54,000) in compensation and costs for the loss of his home after Mr Justice Murphy ruled at Dublin high court he was entitled to a new house or its equivalent market value. The film-maker had sued the Ostan Thoraigh Comhlacht Teoranta hotel and its owner, Patrick Coohan.
Earlier that year (2009), Mr Presho was in another court on a matter one could consider much more serious than the demolition of a semi-derelict and abandoned house on a remote island.

Drove through checkpoint during 200 kph car chase - Local - Donegal Democrat
 

Colin M

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Joined
Jul 23, 2012
Messages
5,356
Are you seriously claiming that Cork city is broadly the same as Donegal when it comes to social attitudes to 'outsiders' or conservative social views?

What about Galway city, which in my experience is one of the most cosmopolitan and socially liberal places in Ireland?
Not the cities, obviously. More the rural or smalltown parts of these counties, where people on average are more traditionalist.
 

Asparagus

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
4,882
I am serious. People from the counties next to the Atlantic Ocean are much more 'proud', from my experience, and more conservative (in the Irish way), I would add. The younger, more liberal people tend to leave for Dublin, or the likes of London and New York, and usually don't come back.

I know this attitude very well, given my mother's side of the family hail from one of these counties.


For example, have you ever met a Cork person who does NOT talk about Cork, after a short while? :)
No.

To all of that.
 

CookieMonster

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 19, 2005
Messages
34,801
Tragic story of a couple who bought their dream retreat on Tory Island (off Donegal) in the early 80's having spent many years visiting the place.
Neville Presho quit his career in the 70's to make a film on Tory Island.
He loved the people, the lifestyle, and the simplicity of the island.
They bought, (I assume) on a romantic whim, rather than for an investment of to flip (hate that term).
Then in 1993, whilst working in New Zealand they received a phone call that someone had offered a pitiful 1000 punts to buy their home.
They rightly refused, then roughly a month later their home was burnt down.
Then a few months later, they received a letter from Donegal Council telling them their house was in a bad state and asked what were they going to do with it. (Is this standard procedure?)
Then 3 months after the Donegal Council letter, the house was razed to the ground. It's not mentioned by whom.
The stress of this ordeal is blamed for the poor man having a nervous breakdown, and also was a factor in the break-up of his marriage.
BBC News - The tale of the 'vanishing house' on Tory Island
Timeline:
House bought in 1982.
Offer refused in 1993.
Burnt down a month later.
Donegal Council send strange letter April 1994.
House disappears between April and July 1994.


What a grubby, little country.

I can't tell you the amount of times I left Ireland on holiday only to return and find my house gone!
 
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