• It has come to our attention that some users may have been "banned" when they tried to change their passwords after the site was hacked due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software. This would have occurred around the end of February and does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you believe you were affected by this, please contact a staff member or use the Contact us link at the bottom of any forum page.

Abandon the concept of 'West Brit'.


EvotingMachine0197

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
8,629
I didn't know there was a Wiki page about this fairly pejorative and still ubiquitous term.

But it does exist and it provides, for me at least, some background into the origins of the words. And that's good because you can't beat a bit of etymology of a Friday night.

The term originates from 19th century Ireland and has evolved over the years. Nationalist leader Daniel O'Connell used it in the British House of Commons in 1832:

"The people of Ireland are ready to become a portion of the Empire, provided they be made so in reality and not in name alone; they are ready to become a kind of West Briton if made so in benefits and justice; but if not, we are Irishmen again."
West Brit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But here's the thing - 105 years after O'Connell first used the term in 1832, in 1937 Ireland enacted its own Constitution and later in 1948 declared a Sovereign Republic of Ireland.

So, it's reasonable to say that any Irish person born in Ireland after 1948 (65 years old or younger) was born as an Irish republican. In my case, having been born in the late 60's, I most certainly am an Irish republican. My allegiance, love, support, and emotions such as anger, disappointment and disgust, have always been directed towards this republic.

And then one day I was called a West Brit. I didn't mind really. I thought they were referring to the fact that my Great Grandfather served in the British Military, and his father before him. Or that some of my father's family had gone there for work. Or because I went there myself for work in the early 90's.

No. None of the above. It was because I didn't hate the British and didn't recoil in disgust at anything British. There was a 'thing' whereby the British were bastards and anyone who didn't agree was a West Brit, or a traitor even.

That was something I simply could not understand, and still don't. To this very day. We have our own constitution, we have our own parliament and we make our own statutes. For better or for worse. So why the fck should anyone be bothered if I have a neutral rather than hateful side for things British..

Anyway, what was I saying. There may have been a time when 'West Briton' had meaning. But now it's just stupid. It really is a term of abuse now.

And by and large, it is only used by those who are insecure about Irish republicanism of the modern kind.
 
Last edited:

ruserious

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,597
I may be after a few but I say up the Irish ************************ the begrudgers.
 

Cruimh

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2010
Messages
85,704
I didn't know there was a Wiki page about this fairly pejorative and still ubiquitous term.

But it does exist and it provides, for me at least, some background into the origins of the words. And that's good because you can't beat a bit of etymology of a Friday night.



West Brit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But here's the thing - 105 years after O'Connell first used the term in 1832, in 1937 Ireland enacted its own Constitution and later in 1948 declared a Sovereign Republic of Ireland.

So, it's reasonable to say that any Irish person born in Ireland after 1948 (65 years old or younger) was born as an Irish republican. In my case, having been born in the late 60's, I most certainly am an Irish republican. My allegiance, love, support, and emotions such as anger, disappointment and disgust, have always been directed towards this republic.

And then one day I was called a West Brit. I didn't mind really. I thought they were referring to the fact that my Great Grandfather served in the British Military, and his father before him. Or that some of my father's family had gone there for work. Or because I went there myself for work in the early 90's.

No. None of the above. It was because I didn't hate the British and didn't recoil in disgust at anything British. There was a 'thing' whereby the British were bastards and anyone who didn't agree was a West Brit, or a traitor even.

That was something I simply could not understand, and still don't. To this very day. We have our own constitution, we have our own parliament and we make our own statutes. For better or for worse. So why the fck should anyone be bothered if I have a neutral rather than hateful side for things British..

Anyway, what was I saying. There may have been a time when 'West Briton' had meaning. But now it's just stupid. It really is a term of abuse now.

And by and large, it is only used by those who are insecure about Irish republicanism of the modern kind.
You would make Statsman redundant? :shock2:
 

Just Jack

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Messages
3,792
To this very day. We have our own constitution, we have our own parliament and we make our own statutes.
.
Who's we?

Ireland doesn’t have its own parliament or its own constitution.

The 26 county statelet is not Ireland.
 

pippakin

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2010
Messages
9,665
I didn't know there was a Wiki page about this fairly pejorative and still ubiquitous term.

But it does exist and it provides, for me at least, some background into the origins of the words. And that's good because you can't beat a bit of etymology of a Friday night.



West Brit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But here's the thing - 105 years after O'Connell first used the term in 1832, in 1937 Ireland enacted its own Constitution and later in 1948 declared a Sovereign Republic of Ireland.

So, it's reasonable to say that any Irish person born in Ireland after 1948 (65 years old or younger) was born as an Irish republican. In my case, having been born in the late 60's, I most certainly am an Irish republican. My allegiance, love, support, and emotions such as anger, disappointment and disgust, have always been directed towards this republic.

And then one day I was called a West Brit. I didn't mind really. I thought they were referring to the fact that my Great Grandfather served in the British Military, and his father before him. Or that some of my father's family had gone there for work. Or because I went there myself for work in the early 90's.

No. None of the above. It was because I didn't hate the British and didn't recoil in disgust at anything British. There was a 'thing' whereby the British were bastards and anyone who didn't agree was a West Brit, or a traitor even.

That was something I simply could not understand, and still don't. To this very day. We have our own constitution, we have our own parliament and we make our own statutes. For better or for worse. So why the fck should anyone be bothered if I have a neutral rather than hateful side for things British..

Anyway, what was I saying. There may have been a time when 'West Briton' had meaning. But now it's just stupid. It really is a term of abuse now.

And by and large, it is only used by those who are insecure about Irish republicanism of the modern kind.
Didn't Martin McGuinness get a bit of a telling off for using the phrase during the presidential election? I wouldn't be surprised to find the word is hardly used outside of this site and possibly a few neanderthals in the north.

The south is an independent country and has been for nearly a hundred years the people here are comfortable with their identity, silly phrases that might have had some meaning a century ago are irrelevant today. What frightens so called republicans are afraid of today is does the south still want the north?
 
R

Ramps

Didn't Martin McGuinness get a bit of a telling off for using the phrase during the presidential election? I wouldn't be surprised to find the word is hardly used outside of this site and possibly a few neanderthals in the north.

The south is an independent country and has been for nearly a hundred years the people here are comfortable with their identity, silly phrases that might have had some meaning a century ago are irrelevant today. What frightens so called republicans are afraid of today is does the south still want the north?
They've known that for quite a while.

What frightens them even more is that many of their "tribe" in the North don't seem to want the South!
 

EvotingMachine0197

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
8,629
Didn't Martin McGuinness get a bit of a telling off for using the phrase during the presidential election? I wouldn't be surprised to find the word is hardly used outside of this site and possibly a few neanderthals in the north.

The south is an independent country and has been for nearly a hundred years the people here are comfortable with their identity, silly phrases that might have had some meaning a century ago are irrelevant today. What frightens so called republicans are afraid of today is does the south still want the north?
Yeh.

McGuinness blames

But I'd rather this thread stayed on the topic of the use of the terminology.
 

EvotingMachine0197

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
8,629
It is on topic. McGuinness used the phrase in exactly the derogatory way it has evolved. The ref to the south being comfortable as it is is one of the main reasons phrases like 'West Brit' are used.
Indeed pippakin. You are correct.
 

Ren84

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
50,016
A West Brit is someone who has an almost slavish, deference towards Britain. Basically FG and INM. A quite a few on this site as well.
 

Mitsui2

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
33,382
I didn't know there was a Wiki page about this fairly pejorative and still ubiquitous term.

But it does exist and it provides, for me at least, some background into the origins of the words. And that's good because you can't beat a bit of etymology of a Friday night.



West Brit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But here's the thing - 105 years after O'Connell first used the term in 1832, in 1937 Ireland enacted its own Constitution and later in 1948 declared a Sovereign Republic of Ireland.

So, it's reasonable to say that any Irish person born in Ireland after 1948 (65 years old or younger) was born as an Irish republican. In my case, having been born in the late 60's, I most certainly am an Irish republican. My allegiance, love, support, and emotions such as anger, disappointment and disgust, have always been directed towards this republic.

And then one day I was called a West Brit. I didn't mind really. I thought they were referring to the fact that my Great Grandfather served in the British Military, and his father before him. Or that some of my father's family had gone there for work. Or because I went there myself for work in the early 90's.

No. None of the above. It was because I didn't hate the British and didn't recoil in disgust at anything British. There was a 'thing' whereby the British were bastards and anyone who didn't agree was a West Brit, or a traitor even.

That was something I simply could not understand, and still don't. To this very day. We have our own constitution, we have our own parliament and we make our own statutes. For better or for worse. So why the fck should anyone be bothered if I have a neutral rather than hateful side for things British..

Anyway, what was I saying. There may have been a time when 'West Briton' had meaning. But now it's just stupid. It really is a term of abuse now.

And by and large, it is only used by those who are insecure about Irish republicanism of the modern kind.
I can't actually think of anything to add to (or even detract from) the OP.

Being called a West Brit on P.ie is a rite of passage - it's just one of a clutch of generic insults used by people whose imaginations are as impoverished as their vocabulary.

Well said, though, Evoting.

(PS - Just wondering, after your "Abandon the concept of race" thread the other say - do I see a pattern beginning to emerge? Are you starting a series of threads on the dumbest clichés commonly encountered on P.ie?)
 

Ren84

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
50,016
It is on topic. McGuinness used the phrase in exactly the derogatory way it has evolved. The ref to the south being comfortable as it is is one of the main reasons phrases like 'West Brit' are used.
And McGuinness was more than correct in using it to describe many in the media, principally the Sunday Independent, the voice of the West Brit community in Ireland.
 

Ren84

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
50,016
I can't actually think of anything to add to (or even detract from) the OP.

Being called a West Brit on P.ie is a rite of passage - it's just one of a clutch of generic insults used by people whose imaginations are as impoverished as their vocabulary.

Well said, though, Evoting.

(PS - Just wondering, after your "Abandon the concept of race" thread the other say - do I see a pattern beginning to emerge? Are you starting a series of threads on the dumbest clichés commonly encountered on P.ie?)
Discussion of fukin squirrels day in would probably rank near the top for mind numbingly dumb cliques on Pie.
 
Top