Accent snobbery in the Irish media

lapsedmethodist

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Jun 15, 2008
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There's a wee lassie reads the news in Irish sometimes. She's from the North
and I swear to God I duck everytime she comes on! Every single vowel screams " I know where you live "
 


Wendy

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Some of you are overstating the case. That Cork reporter Pascal Sheehy has a grand lilt.
 

liamfoley

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Usent they call that a mid-atlantic accent?
 

johnfás

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Some of you are overstating the case. That Cork reporter Pascal Sheehy has a grand lilt.
He went to school in Dublin though which means he probably has a slight mix to his accent even if it isn't noticeable.
 

Albert Aherne

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What about Gavin Jennings and his "Bach" with the news in a few mins.......just a little painful:p although at the other extreme,I suppose we should be glad that Bertie want's to go to the Park or the Mansion house and not the RTE newsroom.:eek:
 
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Some of you are overstating the case. That Cork reporter Pascal Sheehy has a grand lilt.
Who?

Pascal SHeeheeeeeeeee, ORTeeeeeee Newzzzzzzzzzzz

That fella, fcker does my head in.

colm Murray makes me laugh though.

I wish I could type an example of him, but it's too hard.

I would love to know how he got his makey upy British brand of accent.
 

fergalr

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Dún Laoghaire is the Irish name. Dunleary is simply an English corruption.
No.. I mean pronunciation-wise. It's never pronounced Doon Lowra when it's in an English sentence.
 

MookieBaylock

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"Doon Lowra" is the worst one for me. It's "Dun Leary"!!
No, it's actually DOON-LAY-RA.. if we want to be precise..

Anyway, if you drive through south Dublin you may notice the following signs.

Cnoc Dubh
BLACKROCK

Teach Mealog
TEMPLEOGUE

Dun Laoghaire

the reason the latter has one name only is because it's a native name... not translated.

sorry for the lack of fada... i am using a german keyboard.
 

MookieBaylock

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speaking of which - how come such true blue Dubs the Lenihan brothers and E. O'Cuiv have such rustic lilts?
O'Cuiv - I don't get. I presume it's put on.

Conor Lenihan has a Dublin accent.

Brian? Yeah that is confusing.. was he schooled down the country by any chance?
 

CookieMonster

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O'Cuiv - I don't get. I presume it's put on.

Conor Lenihan has a Dublin accent.

Brian? Yeah that is confusing.. was he schooled down the country by any chance?
No, both Brian and Conor are Belvedere boys.
 

femmefatale

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There's a wee lassie reads the news in Irish sometimes. She's from the North
and I swear to God I duck everytime she comes on! Every single vowel screams " I know where you live "
How did she slip through the net! :rolleyes: Don't you think you should judge on her news reading abilities rather than on what you associate her particular Irish accent with? Would you rather she feigned a different accent, or should such people simply not seek or be given employment in front-line broadcast media?

My problem with a lot of the accents on RTE, and in Irish and British media generally, is that they seem forced and affected, and therefore sound false and contrived. Listening to someone try and suppress their natural accent is never pleasant. That people still feel the need to adopt a supposedly more rarefied way of speaking, points to the fact that we have not fully overcome our hang-ups about class and other prejudices, and still hold to the spurious belief that one class or geographical identity is inherently more superior/inferior to another.
 

ajax1000

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Try Australia for accents. The mythology of a classless Australia really makes me laugh. It really does matter to speak with a soft Australian accent in the media.
 

reknaw

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Local accents and dialects are a wealth in any country.

I was at home in Laois reading a history of the area just when an elderly neighbour popped in. I asked him did he know Lord Portarlington had had 27,000 acres of land at his peak.

He thought for a moment and replied: "Bejaysus, he must've got it a hoor to settle for six foot!":lol::lol::lol:
 

femmefatale

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Try Australia for accents. The mythology of a classless Australia really makes me laugh. It really does matter to speak with a soft Australian accent in the media.
Someone once told me that in England the accents of people from the Celtic nations (Scotland, Ireland and Wales) were perceived to be classless and, therefore, could be used without 'refinement'. The north of Ireland accent, however, they insisted was different. Apparently we have a British regional accent and the normal insistence on 'refinement' applies.
 

Wendy

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speaking of which - how come such true blue Dubs the Lenihan brothers and E. O'Cuiv have such rustic lilts?
Yeah, that's a neat reversal of the tendency by rustics* to affect a metropolitan accent to make themselves sound posh or whatever.

*No offence intended; I'm a rustic myself.
 

st333ve

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Well theres no chance of anyone from Antrim ever reading RTE news.

"There was a wee problim tiday with thon conemy, the all lost their money so they did"

I couldnt imagine someone with a thick Cork or Dublin accent ever doing it either, half the country wouldnt be able to understand.

I think there's a logic behind RTE's choices, the RTE presenters have most likely had past elocution lessons.
A lot of people who are aiming for such jobs would have them, that why they sound almost English or America.
 


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