AI spraying machines could cut by 90% mass spraying of pesticides and fertilizer, restoring pristine fields

Patslatt1

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AI spraying machines could cut by 90% mass spraying of pesticides and fertilizer, restoring pristine fields

See https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-01-11/this-army-of-ai-robots-will-feed-the-world

The revolution in AI spraying of lettuce fields is already happening. As discussed in the linked article, newly invented spraying machines can identify the stages of development of lettuces, culling the inferior ones with targeted overdoses of fertilizer and leaving the best to grow unimpeded. AI software can identify these stages as the machines move along by comparing lettuce images photographed on the ground with a vast database of images. The billions of calculations per second of computer chips enables this AI.

With the backing of giant agricultural machinery company Deere, the technical development of such machines will be refined and mass production will take off soon.

The same AI software methods can be applied in spraying machines for herbicides and pesticides. Mass spraying that is harmful to biodiversity can largely be replaced by spraying of small amounts targeted at specific weeds. Possibly, there could be as much as a 90% reduction in the amounts sprayed. Adoption of this disruptive change should be swift given the huge cost savings available in spraying as well as in the replacement of expensive genetically engineered crops.

The results should be very beneficial: a restoration of biodiversity and pristine fields,an end to pollution of waterways and crops that are close to organic in quality.
 


Half Nelson

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From your link -
In 2006 an Arkansas cotton farmer noticed that the Roundup he was spraying on his fields wasn’t killing the pigweed the way it used to. Two years later there were 10 million acres of Roundup-resistant weeds in the U.S., and by 2012, 30 million acres. Today there are 70 million acres, an area of land roughly the size of Nevada.
On the plus side - pigweed is as nutritious as spinach
 

farnaby

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The same AI software methods can be applied in spraying machines for herbicides and pesticides. Mass spraying that is harmful to biodiversity can largely be replaced by spraying of small amounts targeted at specific weeds. Possibly, there could be as much as a 90% reduction in the amounts sprayed. Adoption of this disruptive change should be swift given the huge cost savings available in spraying as well as in the replacement of expensive genetically engineered crops.
Good news, I'm just concerned about the amount of conditional words in discussions like these. For every genuine, mass-impact disruption a huge amount fall by the wayside or the application is far less than the blue-sky thinkers anticipate.

I'm in that space at the moment - what looks like a no-brainer needs a huge amount of graft to gain momentum.
 

GDPR

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If true, this falls into the win-win-win category for reduced costs, increase production and huge reduction in pollutants damaging biodiversity, water etc.
 

gleeful

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See https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-01-11/this-army-of-ai-robots-will-feed-the-world

The revolution in AI spraying of lettuce fields is already happening. As discussed in the linked article, newly invented spraying machines can identify the stages of development of lettuces, culling the inferior ones with targeted overdoses of fertilizer and leaving the best to grow unimpeded. AI software can identify these stages as the machines move along by comparing lettuce images photographed on the ground with a vast database of images. The billions of calculations per second of computer chips enables this AI.

With the backing of giant agricultural machinery company Deere, the technical development of such machines will be refined and mass production will take off soon.

The same AI software methods can be applied in spraying machines for herbicides and pesticides. Mass spraying that is harmful to biodiversity can largely be replaced by spraying of small amounts targeted at specific weeds. Possibly, there could be as much as a 90% reduction in the amounts sprayed. Adoption of this disruptive change should be swift given the huge cost savings available in spraying as well as in the replacement of expensive genetically engineered crops.

The results should be very beneficial: a restoration of biodiversity and pristine fields,an end to pollution of waterways and crops that are close to organic in quality.
Seems like AI might do one better - and instead of killing with pesticides, perhaps it could mechanically remove things? It used to be called 'weeding'.
 

Patslatt1

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Good news, I'm just concerned about the amount of conditional words in discussions like these. For every genuine, mass-impact disruption a huge amount fall by the wayside or the application is far less than the blue-sky thinkers anticipate.

I'm in that space at the moment - what looks like a no-brainer needs a huge amount of graft to gain momentum.
The potentially huge cost savings for farmers will drive rapid adoption as is happening in lettuce farming.
 

Patslatt1

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Seems like AI might do one better - and instead of killing with pesticides, perhaps it could mechanically remove things? It used to be called 'weeding'.
That would be mechanically time consuming given the strong roots of many weeds.
 

gleeful

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That would be mechanically time consuming given the strong roots of many weeds.
Check out the mechanical food sorting machines made by Dublin company Tomra. They use machine vision (a kind of AI) to optically identify defects or categories of food, then a lightening fast puff of air to pop items off the belt into different bins. When its running full speed you can't even see it working - its just a blur.
 

Patslatt1

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Check out the mechanical food sorting machines made by Dublin company Tomra. They use machine vision (a kind of AI) to optically identify defects or categories of food, then a lightening fast puff of air to pop items off the belt into different bins. When its running full speed you can't even see it working - its just a blur.
There is a surprising lack of interest in the AI agricultural revolution. Seems like the Irish hve lost touch with the land.
 

lord

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We have Gannon instead build over the Land Gannon makes money the land dies the flora dies the fauna dies Gannon makes money
 


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