Alabama executes 83 year old man

Cruimh

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https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/04/19/603883731/alabama-serial-bomber-walter-leroy-moody-83-to-be-executed-thursday


Alabama has executed 83-year-old serial bomber Walter Leroy Moody by lethal injection.


Moody is the oldest inmate executed in the U.S. since the Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.


The Associated Press reports that he made no response when asked if he had any last statement.


Moody built shrapnel-sheathed bombs hidden in packages rigged to explode when opened. In 1989, one of those bombs killed 11th Circuit Judge Robert S. Vance at his home in Mountain Brook, Ala., and two days later, another bomb killed civil rights attorney Robert E. Robinson at his office in Savannah, Ga. The Alabama bomb also seriously injured the judge's wife, Helen Vance.
I must say from the off that I'm not a supporter of the death penalty, though I waver in respect of some crimes where the person is likely to keep re-offending, in order to protect the public and especially children. It is strange that this came up as I was wondering about the death penalty the other night while watching TV footage from the Battle of the Bulge, which showed US troops (as a firing squad) executing captured German prisoners because they had been caught behind the lines wearing US uniforms, part of a plan to cause Chaos.

But it seems incredibly cruel that this stretched out over 20 years (he was sentenced to death in 1997) with the result that this man was 83 years old when executed.
 


statsman

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https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/04/19/603883731/alabama-serial-bomber-walter-leroy-moody-83-to-be-executed-thursday




I must say from the off that I'm not a supporter of the death penalty, though I waver in respect of some crimes where the person is likely to keep re-offending, in order to protect the public and especially children. It is strange that this came up as I was wondering about the death penalty the other night while watching TV footage from the Battle of the Bulge, which showed US troops (as a firing squad) executing captured German prisoners because they had been caught behind the lines wearing US uniforms, part of a plan to cause Chaos.

But it seems incredibly cruel that this stretched out over 20 years (he was sentenced to death in 1997) with the result that this man was 83 years old when executed.
I'm utterly opposed to the death penalty, and this seems like a particularly cruel instance of an already barbaric act.
 

enuffisenuff

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Its no crueler than blowing people up I guess....
 

tsarbomb

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I agree with the death penalty in certain circumstances and this is one of them. Moody was evil. Provided that the court was absolutely certain that he committed these crimes then yes it was perfectly reasonable to execute this serial bomber.
 

statsman

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Its no crueler than blowing people up I guess....
I agree with the death penalty in certain circumstances and this is one of them. Moody was evil. Provided that the court was absolutely certain that he committed these crimes then yes it was perfectly reasonable to execute this serial bomber.
I expect more from a democratic state than I do from a madman.
 

Cruimh

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He was executed by lethal injection. Much better way to go than one of Moody's shrapnel bombs.
For me there are several components to this - the one I'm addressing is the delay of twenty one years between sentence and execution. Does the US 8th amendment, which applies both federally and in respect of individual states, which forbids "cruel and unusual Punishment" not kick in when an 83 year old man is executed after a delay of 21 years?
 

NYCKY

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I agree with the death penalty in certain circumstances and this is one of them. Moody was evil. Provided that the court was absolutely certain that he committed these crimes then yes it was perfectly reasonable to execute this serial bomber.
In these death penalty cases, people all too often forget the victims. Some people seem to think that the person being executed is the actual victim.
 

tsarbomb

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For me there are several components to this - the one I'm addressing is the delay of twenty one years between sentence and execution. Does the US 8th amendment, which applies both federally and in respect of individual states, which forbids "cruel and unusual Punishment" not kick in when an 83 year old man is executed after a delay of 21 years?
Why was there such a delay though? Was it down to his appeals?

I wouldn't be too concerned about the US 8th amendment in this case. If electric chairs weren't considered cruel or unusual I doubt this will.
 

Cruimh

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In these death penalty cases, people all too often forget the victims. Some people seem to think that the person being executed is the actual victim.
Why was there such a delay though? Was it down to his appeals?

I wouldn't be too concerned about the US 8th amendment in this case. If electric chairs weren't considered cruel or unusual I doubt this will.
Is the long and drawn out appeals process not distressing for his victims and their families?
 

tsarbomb

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In these death penalty cases, people all too often forget the victims. Some people seem to think that the person being executed is the actual victim.
Not just the people who died, but the serious injuries must be horrible to live with.
 

Betson

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No sympathy for this chap at all , but the death penalty is just wrong. The state should be above revenge killings and an eye for eye attitude ect
 

NYCKY

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Is the long and drawn out appeals process not distressing for his victims and their families?
Yes probably but not nearly as distressing as actually blowing them up.

Let's remember that it's the murderers/terrorists and their anti death penalty acolytes that prolong this with little regard for the real victims. They try every trick in the book making sure to keep as many options open as possible to try different angle and different routes.

There is a running joke about the California death row inmates, that they are more likely to die of old age while they exhaust the appeals process. That nearly happened here.

One way of avoiding 20 years on death row is to not go around blowing people up. There were choices made and they have consequences.
 

Bill

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Is the long and drawn out appeals process not distressing for his victims and their families?
[video=youtube;tY3V0JJqnqo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tY3V0JJqnqo[/video]
 

Supra

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I oppose the death penalty especially in cases for political prisoners.
However if any nation or state want's to have a death penalty for certain crimes such as serial rapists or killers without conscience then let them at it.
This fella wasn't 83 when sentence was passed so that's tough.
 


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