Albert Perry's genome: the Y-Chromosome Adam is much older than it was thought.

Toland

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Any good look at any human male's Y-chromosome examined since genetic coding was developed has for a long time inidcated that we all share a male ancestor from about 160,000 years back.

That was until an African-American by the name of Albert Perry came to the attention of geneticists. His DNA was submitted for analysis by a female relative a few years ago. His Y-Chromosome breaks all the rules. It looks like it separated from the rest of human kind about 340,000 years ago. The news has only just come out: presumably up to now they were double-checking their astounding results.

Here's a New Scientist article on the subject:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23240-the-father-of-all-men-is-340000-years-old/?cmpid=EMP|NSNS|2016-1906-GLOBAL-maywk3_dads|fatherofallmen&utm_medium=EMP&utm_source=NSNS&utm_campaign=MayWk3_Dads&utm_content=fatherofallmen

and here's the Abstract for the relevant study:

http://www.cell.com/ajhg/abstract/S0002-9297(13)00073-6

Rather madly, the oldest evidence for the existence of anatomically modern human beings dates from about 190,000 years ago!

So it seems that there must have been at least some interbreeding between anatomically modern humans and other species long before the much more recent interbreeding discovered a few years back between Cromagnon man and the Neanderthals (probably in the Middle East).

They've since found 11 more men, all living in a single village in Cameroon, who have a similar Y-Chromosome to Perry.
 
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GDPR

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A quick google search reveals that this was know since 2013 but presumably they have been verifying as the OP states. Albert Perry from South Carolina is now deceased. Another example of just when scientists think they know stuff then along comes an Albert Perry and some head scratching commences.
 

Who is John Galt?

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A quick google search reveals that this was know since 2013 but presumably they have been verifying as the OP states. Albert Perry from South Carolina is now deceased. Another example of just when scientists think they know stuff then along comes an Albert Perry and some head scratching commences.
But that's the beauty and essence of science..... not its defect!
 

GabhaDubh

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some head scratching commences.
Which got me thinking, remember reading that in the development of our species one of the indicators was the difference between head and pubic lice ( I know, it gives me the creeps also). As we shed our full body hair it allowed us to survive in higher temperatures and to pursue game for longer distances.
 

Chunder

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So the end sequence of the last episode of the remake of Battlestar Galactica is untrue. I really thought that's where we evolved from... Gaius and Six...
 

Toland

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Which got me thinking, remember reading that in the development of our species one of the indicators was the difference between head and pubic lice ( I know, it gives me the creeps also). As we shed our full body hair it allowed us to survive in higher temperatures and to pursue game for longer distances.
I believe biologists use the genetic difference between headlice and pubic lice to estimate how long it's been since we lost most of our body hair other than the stuff on our heads and our pubic area, respectively.

That could be an urban legend, but gullible old me is convinced.
 

Half Nelson

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firefly123

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Which got me thinking, remember reading that in the development of our species one of the indicators was the difference between head and pubic lice ( I know, it gives me the creeps also). As we shed our full body hair it allowed us to survive in higher temperatures and to pursue game for longer distances.
I read somewhere recently that we can pursue prey longer and further than any other land animal. Part of our success story I suppose
 

Half Nelson

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I believe biologists use the genetic difference between headlice and pubic lice to estimate how long it's been since we lost most of our body hair other than the stuff on our heads and our pubic area, respectively.

That could be an urban legend, but gullible old me is convinced.
I can see the flaw with your hypothesis.

No, I'm not about to spell it out.;)
 

GabhaDubh

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"Humans are unusual among lice hosts; they provide homes for more than one species of lice. The pubic louse looks quite different from its counterparts in human hair and clothing. Through genetic analysis, Reed and colleagues determined that more than 3 million years ago, the human pubic louse originated from gorilla lice, where it adapted to grab onto large hairs spread farther apart. This finding means that humans and gorillas must have lived in close proximity during this time period. The information is significant, because gorilla fossils from this time are virtually nonexistent, Reed said.

Reed and colleagues have also looked at the split between head and clothing lice for clues as to when humans began wearing clothes. They found that clothing lice diverged from head lice between 80,000 and 170,000 years ago, most likely at the earlier end of that range."


Lice Reveal Clues to Human Evolution
 

farnaby

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I believe biologists use the genetic difference between headlice and pubic lice to estimate how long it's been since we lost most of our body hair other than the stuff on our heads and our pubic area, respectively.

That could be an urban legend, but gullible old me is convinced.
Last week. Back sack and crack.
 

Polly Ticks

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I read somewhere recently that we can pursue prey longer and further than any other land animal. Part of our success story I suppose
And we've already combined efforts and reached a point where, at least in theory, we could send an autonomous or semi-autonomous weaponized drone out to do the hunting for us (to say nothing of industrialized meat production).

That's another part of our success story... that we're pack animals. (Same trait is responsible for a lot of the darker elements in human history...)

Humans: a mixed bag. :D
 

Stentor

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I read somewhere recently that we can pursue prey longer and further than any other land animal. Part of our success story I suppose
Yes, when we use 4X4's we certainly do but I thought wolves or African wild dogs held that title.

Depends on what's meant by 'pursue' and 'prey'. Is a modern human pursuing their prey when they emigrate to Australia?
 

Catalpast

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Any good look at any human male's Y-chromosome examined since genetic coding was developed has for a long time inidcated that we all share a male ancestor from about 160,000 years back.

That was until an African-American by the name of Albert Perry came to the attention of geneticists. His DNA was submitted for analysis by a female relative a few years ago. His Y-Chromosome breaks all the rules. It looks like it separated from the rest of human kind about 340,000 years ago. The news has only just come out: presumably up to now they were double-checking their astounding results.

Here's a New Scientist article on the subject:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23240-the-father-of-all-men-is-340000-years-old/?cmpid=EMP|NSNS|2016-1906-GLOBAL-maywk3_dads|fatherofallmen&utm_medium=EMP&utm_source=NSNS&utm_campaign=MayWk3_Dads&utm_content=fatherofallmen

and here's the Abstract for the relevant study:

http://www.cell.com/ajhg/abstract/S0002-9297(13)00073-6

Rather madly, the oldest evidence for the existence of anatomically modern human beings dates from about 190,000 years ago!

So it seems that there must have been at least some interbreeding between anatomically modern humans and other species long before the much more recent interbreeding discovered a few years back between Cromagnon man and the Neanderthals (probably in the Middle East).

They've since found 11 more men, all living in a single village in Cameroon, who have a similar Y-Chromosome to Perry.
Long since stopped believing the prognosis from DNA tests to explain how we got here

- there might be a common ancestor

- or there may not

We will probably never know for sure....

But I think the various Races split off one from another a very very long time ago.....
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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But I think the various Races split off one from another a very very long time ago.....
and different Environments have evolved these subgroups very differently. Specially adapted to heat, cold, mountains, dairy tolerant, vast expanses of undulating terrain, islands, fishing, bacteria, livestock, cultures, parasites.....all different in different places.

oh, but no, you cannot say that.....
 

Diawlbach

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I read somewhere recently that we can pursue prey longer and further than any other land animal. Part of our success story I suppose
It's called pursuit hunting, and we (and wolves) are the kings of it. The Khoisan still do it. You can watch in this clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=826HMLoiE_o

We're distance specialists; we're not the strongest, we're certainly not explosively strong like most ambush predators, but we're a remarkably tough lot for our size and we will keep going forever. It's why horses used die like flies while the infantry kept going; we can keep going for an astonishingly long time.
 


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