An Irexit: the opportunities for Ireland outside the EU.


Hans Von Horn

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Ireland should signal to the World that it ill follow the UK if it leaves the EU. We can use the opportunity at th every least to negotiate a better deal on Debt, on Fishing, on Taxation, on Immigration, and on our Energy Policy.

Ireland needs free trade with China, Japan, India and the USA, and is prevented from having free trade through EU membership.

The EU accounted for €5,151 million or 53 percent of total goods exports of which €1,496 million went to Belgium and €1,153 million to Great Britain. The US was the main non-EU destination accounting for €2,329 million or 24 percent of total exports.

If Britain leaves the EU most of our trade would lie outside the EU and this is the market set to grow most.
Leaving the EU would restore our Democracy, as a fundamental principle of democracy is that one government and Parliament cannot bind another. Greek voters learned they can no longer change economic policy, however bad the existing one may be.

The argument of Pooled Sovereignty making us stronger is nonsense as our politicians are in denial about how much power we have thrown away.

The Irish voice at the table of 28 is not heard or heeded. The EU is not a mutual benefit Trade Club. It is on a reckless ride to Political Union, based on Socialism and Stagnation.

The Single European Currency has been a disaster, and has been at the root of Ireland’s economic collapse of 2008. Being in the EU exposes us to the political tension in Eastern Europe and to the risk of energy security arising from withdrawal of access to Russian Gas.

The EU has no intention of allowing us to set our own tax rates as evidenced by the Google Tax debacle.
Irish Farmers and Fishermen would be much better off outside the EU.
 

storybud1

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I would much prefer if we just kicked Germany out of the EU and started again ?

Power corrupts and it shows, time and time again,,
 
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The EU was not the reason for the Irish economic catastrophe - that was entirely a home-grown affair.

If the UK, a huge country with over 60 million people, the only world city in the EU, the largest financial centre in the EU, and a long-standing net contributor to EU coffers, can't negotiate more than what was today described as "thin gruel watered down", what hope do you really think Ireland has to negotiate anything of substance?

The bluff would be called immediately. After the Nice 2 and Lisbon 2 referendums, it has been proved beyond any doubt that the Irish people will never be other than good compliant little boys and girls.

Having voted for the stupidity of the single currency (which was supported by many more people than admit it now), Ireland is on a one-way track to ever closer union. Britain is not. Partition has never been more partitionier. It's far too late to be acting all hard now - the chance to do that came and went a long time ago.
 

Hans Von Horn

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The EU was not the reason for the Irish economic catastrophe - that was entirely a home-grown affair.

If the UK, a huge country with over 60 million people, the only world city in the EU, the largest financial centre in the EU, and a long-standing net contributor to EU coffers, can't negotiate more than what was today described as "thin gruel watered down", what hope do you really think Ireland has to negotiate anything of substance?

The bluff would be called immediately. After the Nice 2 and Lisbon 2 referendums, it has been proved beyond any doubt that the Irish people will never be other than good compliant little boys and girls.

Having voted for the stupidity of the single currency (which was supported by many more people than admit it now), Ireland is on a one-way track to ever closer union. Britain is not. Partition has never been more partitionier. It's far too late to be acting all hard now - the chance to do that came and went a long time ago.
The low interest currency without the facility of inflation of debt made it a lot more painful.
 

Analyzer

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Well we would free ourselves from a load of BS concerning duch trivial banslities as what constitutes a cabbage and what deals we can do with countries like India and Canada.
 

danger here

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The low interest currency without the facility of inflation of debt made it a lot more painful.
Wouldn't have made a blind bit of difference if interest rates had been under Irish control - the then government used what levers it did still control to accelerate towards the cliff, not to pull the brakes. They were procyclical maniacs.

And anyway - even if you were correct, whose fault is it? I remember being in Ireland in the 1990s telling people that if they brought in the single currency then they would be hitched to a one-size-fits-all monetary policy where interest rate decisions would never be made with Ireland in mind. I asked people how they thought the ECB would reconcile the conflicting interest rate needs of the likes of Ireland and the likes of Germany. They looked at me as if I was some sort of mental case. "Ah but we'll be able to go to Spain and not have to change our money!" was a stock reply, at a time when everyone was mindlessly telling me that being "European" represented "modernity" and that everything EU was inherently great. And now, of course, the same people all deny they ever said those things. You made your beds...
 

hmmm

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Great, we could go back to being the wealthy, modern and open nation that we were before we joined the EU.

No-one gave a damn about "fish" back when we weren't in the EU, so why some people seem obsessed by it now is a mystery. The thousands of people working in the IFSC or Google/Dell etc do not want to become fishermen when their jobs disappear.
 

feedmelies

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Think it would be better to focus on non European migration - nothing wrong with European migrants but Africans, Arabs etc. should be stopped.
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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in terms of immigrants , who would fit in Ireland better ?
group A) australians, new zealanders, canadians, americans, Brits, South Africans, selected high-skill people from the commonwealth with English as a first language. Young families or single people balanced 50:50 by gender.
or
group B) the current rabble crowding our shores , different language, different religion, different values. Hordes of unskilled 'single' young men ( many who have abandoned wife and kids back in the third world...and now keen to start a second family in Ireland with a nice local girl or two ), benefits and healthcare migrants, the elderly lowly educated,



Can you imagine those from Group A sitting on the ground around our bank machines, covered in a blanket and begging ? Or forming large ghettoes where nobody speaks English ? Or hogging the dole queues forever ? Or getting involved in radical Islam ? or forming cliques in every workplace where they talk their own language to each other and exclude everybody else ?


Currently Norway, Switzerland, iceland etc are doing just fine without the EU. The swiss are even banning the building of Mosques. The Lisbon treaty was Rape. We said No. And we got it forced on us.

Irexit or call it 'Eirexion' to represent us standing up for our future survival.
 
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drummed

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We are a constitutional Republic. That's not strictly the same thing as a democracy.
 

MichaelR

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in terms of immigrants , who would fit in Ireland better ?
group A) australians, new zealanders, canadians, americans, Brits, South Africans, people from the UK commonwealth with English as a first language
or
group B) the current rabble crowding our shores , different language, different religion, different values.
The EU "rabble" has the same majority religion as the majority religion in Ireland and culturally represents, er, the fringe of Roman Catholic Europe. Just not this one, the other one. And also the legacy of fighting off an empire, again the other one.

UK Commonwealth... You seriously think Pakistanis or Ghana natives with English as a first language (they do exist) would fit in better than Poles who learned English? Or you think Canadians would swarm in to the jobs that the Polish people took?

Eastern Europeans are much closer to native Irish people in religion and values than natives of most Commonwealth members. The decision to open the job market to new EU members in 2004 was the best immigration decision Ireland could make. It preempted the kind of large-scale incompatible influx that the UK has experienced.
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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The EU "rabble" has the same majority religion as the majority religion in Ireland and culturally represents, er, the fringe of Roman Catholic Europe. .
the EU has forced us to open our borders to EVERYBODY.

the general apathy to this thread is indicative of the general apathy of the Bovine irish to the wholescale loss of sovereignty and self determination. Was 1916-1921 all in vain ?
 

GDPR

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Ireland needs free trade with China, Japan, India and the USA, and is prevented from having free trade through EU membership.
Dont' forget Russia. If the EU turns up it's nose at trade opportunities with Russia then surely thats their problem, not ours ? Russia has never done us any harm. In fact I can think of a few Irish people who fled the British empire for opportunities there over the last few hundred years [ as the place is part of Europe, always has been part of Europe and always will be]. Proof the EU is actually dividing Europe.
 

Watcher2

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Stop combining two words to make one. Its stupid. Yours doesn't even sound right. At least Brexit makes a proper sound and has the look, sound and feel of a real word.
 

Spanner Island

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The EU was not the reason for the Irish economic catastrophe - that was entirely a home-grown affair.

If the UK, a huge country with over 60 million people, the only world city in the EU, the largest financial centre in the EU, and a long-standing net contributor to EU coffers, can't negotiate more than what was today described as "thin gruel watered down", what hope do you really think Ireland has to negotiate anything of substance?

The bluff would be called immediately. After the Nice 2 and Lisbon 2 referendums, it has been proved beyond any doubt that the Irish people will never be other than good compliant little boys and girls.

Having voted for the stupidity of the single currency (which was supported by many more people than admit it now), Ireland is on a one-way track to ever closer union. Britain is not. Partition has never been more partitionier. It's far too late to be acting all hard now - the chance to do that came and went a long time ago.
Personally I believe politicians around Europe have been totally dishonest and conniving throughout the existence of the EU.

I believe joining the €uro was part and parcel of Maastricht... and yet I never remember having any sort of national debate regarding the €uro at that time.

It didn't feature in the debate afaic'ed... because our dishonest and scheming politicians deflected attention elsewhere... which in those days was usually towards large wads of EU money to buy voters with.

Throughout our EU experience we've had w*nker politicians claiming wins as their own and losses as the big bad EU doing it to Ireland. And I reckon this happens throughout the EU.

It is politicians at national level who have done the EU huge damage due to the way they use it for their own agendas.

Plus the EU has become increasingly aloof and disconnected from EU citizens and a democratic deficit is now obvious.

The entire thing is a mess.

I'm not sure horse, stable door and bolted is accurate either... not considering what we've seen in the last decade or so... and how useless the EU really is.

I'm not sure about further integration being a fait accompli either... although it is definitely still a threat...

But given the shambles that is the migration crisis and the horrendous way Merkel in particular allowed that to happen... and I reckon the potential for further integration has been dampened a bit.

And of course in Ireland we've seen how things really work since 2008 and before then... and how EU citizens definitely fall down the list of priorities when the sh!t hits the EU fan and how they're bullied when they don't give the answers the EU wants.
 
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