An Irexit: the opportunities for Ireland outside the EU.


foxfordbhoy

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It's the EU which is causing that immigration.

Sweden and Germany invited them in and now expects you to take them...

If you absolutely refuse, and there's little sign your politicians of any stripe would stand up to Merkel, they can always just make them citizens, and then they'll have the right to live in any EU country and there's shag all you can do about it.
Dont forget the Kalegri plan
 

shiel

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The problem with Irexit is that it leaves us back depending on our former colonial masters and cut off from 500 million fellow citizens in the EU.

Not a easy case to make.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
There isn't a case for Irexit if you are looking at economics. None at all. I wouldn't give much for Irexit's chances in philosophical debate either.

And I say that as a fellow who liked the EC, and the idea that business and social ties stemming from that trade bloc arrangement. Not a fan of the EU federation either.

Just thinking of some of the sums involved in various areas of life the Irexit argument doesn't even get off the floor. Brexiteers in the UK have had to hold out a carrot of hope to the donkey of demos in order to reassure everyone that the sunlit upland is there alright. The fact that I've seen no sign of any trade deal beyond rhetoric and the UK is about to leave that trading bloc is somewhat exercising to the cautious mind.
 

Mickeymac

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There isn't a case for Irexit if you are looking at economics. None at all. I wouldn't give much for Irexit's chances in philosophical debate either.

And I say that as a fellow who liked the EC, and the idea that business and social ties stemming from that trade bloc arrangement. Not a fan of the EU federation either.

Just thinking of some of the sums involved in various areas of life the Irexit argument doesn't even get off the floor. Brexiteers in the UK have had to hold out a carrot of hope to the donkey of demos in order to reassure everyone that the sunlit upland is there alright. The fact that I've seen no sign of any trade deal beyond rhetoric and the UK is about to leave that trading bloc is somewhat exercising to the cautious mind.


Apart from the billionaire cheerleaders of Brexit, there is nothing positive in a Brexit for the ordinary Brit worker and the most vulnerable in their society who get by on paltry welfare benefits and food kitchens.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
The main question, as always, 'will there be jam still, for tea.'
 

shiel

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Apart from the billionaire cheerleaders of Brexit, there is nothing positive in a Brexit for the ordinary Brit worker and the most vulnerable in their society who get by on paltry welfare benefits and food kitchens.
Brexiteers regard themselves as inheritors of Empire and regard the citizens of the rest of Europe with contempt.
 

owedtojoy

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Ireland should signal to the World that it ill follow the UK if it leaves the EU. We can use the opportunity at th every least to negotiate a better deal on Debt, on Fishing, on Taxation, on Immigration, and on our Energy Policy.

Ireland needs free trade with China, Japan, India and the USA, and is prevented from having free trade through EU membership.

The EU accounted for 5,151 million or 53 percent of total goods exports of which 1,496 million went to Belgium and 1,153 million to Great Britain. The US was the main non-EU destination accounting for 2,329 million or 24 percent of total exports.

If Britain leaves the EU most of our trade would lie outside the EU and this is the market set to grow most.
Leaving the EU would restore our Democracy, as a fundamental principle of democracy is that one government and Parliament cannot bind another. Greek voters learned they can no longer change economic policy, however bad the existing one may be.

The argument of Pooled Sovereignty making us stronger is nonsense as our politicians are in denial about how much power we have thrown away.

The Irish voice at the table of 28 is not heard or heeded. The EU is not a mutual benefit Trade Club. It is on a reckless ride to Political Union, based on Socialism and Stagnation.

The Single European Currency has been a disaster, and has been at the root of Irelands economic collapse of 2008. Being in the EU exposes us to the political tension in Eastern Europe and to the risk of energy security arising from withdrawal of access to Russian Gas.

The EU has no intention of allowing us to set our own tax rates as evidenced by the Google Tax debacle.
Irish Farmers and Fishermen would be much better off outside the EU.
It is a fundamental principle of democracy and international law that states are bound by the treaties they make. If they break them unilaterally, they must suffer the consequences.

The EU is not a Utopia, but never let Perfect be the Enemy of Good. The EU has imperfections, but they can be reformed. Storming off in a tantrum is cutting off our nose to spite our face.

And big entities like China would NOT have us the same excellent terms of trade that we have through bargaining as part of a massive Single Market. For example, if we went back to the punt, an a-hole like Trump could destroy confidence in it by a single Tweet. He could also slap tariffs on us like he did with Canada, and as a tiny economy we would have no come-back.

Economically, it is a jungle out there, as we are safer sticking with our EU partners. So the UK will find when Trump stabs it in the back with a crap trade deal. Japan has already told the UK it will not give it better trading terms than it had as an EU member.

Subscribe to read | Financial Times
 

owedtojoy

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It is a fundamental principle of democracy and international law that states are bound by the treaties they make. If they break them unilaterally, they must suffer the consequences.

The EU is not a Utopia, but never let Perfect be the Enemy of Good. The EU has imperfections, but they can be reformed. Storming off in a tantrum is cutting off our nose to spite our face.

And big entities like China would NOT have us the same excellent terms of trade that we have through bargaining as part of a massive Single Market. For example, if we went back to the punt, an a-hole like Trump could destroy confidence in it by a single Tweet. He could also slap tariffs on us like he did with Canada, and as a tiny economy we would have no come-back.

Economically, it is a jungle out there, as we are safer sticking with our EU partners. So the UK will find when Trump stabs it in the back with a crap trade deal. Japan has already told the UK it will not give it better trading terms than it had as an EU member.

Subscribe to read | Financial Times
China, India, Brazil or the EU itself will be no different.
 

bang bang

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Great, we could go back to being the wealthy, modern and open nation that we were before we joined the EU.

No-one gave a damn about "fish" back when we weren't in the EU, so why some people seem obsessed by it now is a mystery. The thousands of people working in the IFSC or Google/Dell etc do not want to become fishermen when their jobs disappear.
You're wasting your time these guys believe the EU is to blame for everything. If the Irexit crowd ever stand for election I believe they'll get their answer from the people in no uncertain terms. I predict deposits lost all round.
 

bang bang

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The EU has really only benefitted Irish landowners and landlords, who have enjoyed massively inflated prices at the expense of everyone else.
Sure if we'd never joined the EU we'd be far better of, creating thousands upon thousands of high paid jobs in a workers utopia. Also our roads infrastructure would be so much better, the EU just keeps phuking everything up, let's get out now. As we can see with the Brits the negotiations are a piece of cake and eating it........oh hold on..............there sure are some gobshyte on this site.
 

farnaby

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what is the Kalegri Plan?
Richard Coudenhove-Kalergi was a leading advocate for European unification in the early 20th century, with a colourful Euro-aristo life and (trivia time) the basis for Casablanca character Victor Laszlo.

The Kalergi plan is a hotch-potch anti-semetic conspiracy theory about "white genocide" apparently based on his pan-European philosophy.

If you're intrigued, read about the former, not the latter.
 

raetsel

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Great, we could go back to being the wealthy, modern and open nation that we were before we joined the EU.

No-one gave a damn about "fish" back when we weren't in the EU, so why some people seem obsessed by it now is a mystery. The thousands of people working in the IFSC or Google/Dell etc do not want to become fishermen when their jobs disappear.
No mystery at all - when you're short of a decent argument just resort to the red herrings. ;)
 

raetsel

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Just to add to that, Ireland simply doesn't have the resources or manpower to protect its fisheries in the event of it leaving the EU. And of course how many people would prefer to slave on a cold, wet fishing trawler in dangerous conditions rather than hold down a well paid job in a comfortable, safe environment provided by Dell, Apple, Google or Intel?
 

laughingiraffe

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Just to add to that, Ireland simply doesn't have the resources or manpower to protect its fisheries in the event of it leaving the EU. And of course how many people would prefer to slave on a cold, wet fishing trawler in dangerous conditions rather than hold down a well paid job in a comfortable, safe environment provided by Dell, Apple, Google or Intel?
why wouldn't we be able to get a job in any of those companies?
 

raetsel

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why wouldn't we be able to get a job in any of those companies?
You'll need to put a lot more meat on the bone of that question for me to answer it in any meaningful way.
For example, those jobs would rapidly migrate elsewhere in the event of Irexit.
Essentially I was making the point that thousands of newly-unemployed greater-Dublin-based computer analysts etc. (as a result of exiting the EU), do not have exciting job prospects awaiting in Killybegs....................................................................
 

Mickeymac

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Brexiteers regard themselves as inheritors of Empire and regard the citizens of the rest of Europe with contempt.


Would be surprised if you got an argument with that, especially from our unusual suspects:ROFLMAO:
 

Mickeymac

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You'll need to put a lot more meat on the bone of that question for me to answer it in any meaningful way.
For example, those jobs would rapidly migrate elsewhere in the event of Irexit.
Essentially I was making the point that thousands of newly-unemployed greater-Dublin-based computer analysts etc. (as a result of exiting the EU), do not have exciting job prospects awaiting in Killybegs....................................................................


Leading Brexiteers claim all the good jobs will be in Blighty after March of this year.:D:D if you are mug enough to believe them.:D
 
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