An Post closing 159 post offices

D

Deleted member 51920

But RPT is for public services and amenities. It doesn't buy you a bigger property.
And larger properties tend to be occupied by more people who consume such services.
Hence why the LPT should be rated on the size of the property and not the value.
 


Baron von Biffo

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But do you not understand that you cant have a hospital, Garda Station, school and Post office at your doorstep if you live 10 miles from your nearest neighbour? This is not rocket science.
If you want to live close to such services then move to a more densely populated area.
Let me repeat what I posted above.

It's not so much that rural people want the level of services that Dublin enjoys it's that they resent having to pay the same taxes but have even their very basic services taken away.
 

SweenyTodd

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But do you not understand that you cant have a hospital, Garda Station, school and Post office at your doorstep if you live 10 miles from your nearest neighbour? This is not rocket science.
If you want to live close to such services then move to a more densely populated area.
How many people in Ireland live "10 miles" or even 5 miles from their nearest neighbour?
 

devoutcapitalist

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If FG are closing down Post Offices in areas of high rural demand, then they are going to further alienate whats left of their rural base after the devastation of their rural vote in 2016. But as I said earlier, in Wexford it doesnt seem the plan is that severe, though theres complaints about the closure of the Kilmore Quay and Duncannon post offices.

The govt doesnt appreciate how difficult it is for elderly people to use these new lodgement machines. My mother in her late 70s cannot remember my instructions on how to do so or is set in her ways. For such persons the Post Office (especially if they can no longer drive) are essential. The Bank of Ireland branch has eliminated the lodgement/withdrawal desks completely in favour of machines, to the point where she asks me to do her lodgements for her because she doesnt know how to use them.
How is it FG's fault that loss making post offices are closing down? You say you don't like the way politics is carried out in this country but your very much part of the parish pump, parochial mindset that prevents this country been run in a more efficient manner.
 

devoutcapitalist

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Let me repeat what I posted above.

It's not so much that rural people want the level of services that Dublin enjoys it's that they resent having to pay the same taxes but have even their very basic services taken away.
How long do you think Rural Ireland would survive if Dublin became an Independent State? The economic success of Dublin props up large parts of the country.
 
D

Deleted member 51920

Let me repeat what I posted above.

It's not so much that rural people want the level of services that Dublin enjoys it's that they resent having to pay the same taxes but have even their very basic services taken away.
But city people are massively subsidising rural communities - from farming through to roads, electricity, postal delivery, etc
It costs so much more to provide any kind of service to a guy half way up a mountain compared with in a city
 

seanof

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I think the issue might be that those owning a rural house that has a footprint of say 100 + sq m or more + surrounding land pay a fraction of those who own flats or similar in Dublin.

They laugh a lot at us. But often demand the same services just the same!
In fairness, it is amusing to see Dubliners rushing around dementedly, clutching ludicrously-priced containers of coffee and hear them pronouncing "house" as "hyse".
 

devoutcapitalist

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The closure of postoffices is nothing new . The CWU the main union for postal workers is in the company's pocket. You see time and time again company spokespersons and union reps drinking together in the pubs in Dublin after important meetings. Like two boxers in a ring they shadow box to keep their bosses/members happy but afterwards drink and laugh about how they are fooling them. The union full time reps earn almost twice as much as any of their highest earning members for doing a couple of hours a week. Its a pure joke but the members are being told that without a union they have no recourse to take on the company even though the union men that represent them are to all intents company men themselves. The postmasters union is ineffective without the backing of the CWU but the CWU are bought and paid for by the company. Many deals will be done in the future by the CWU for turning a blind eye to this disgraceful closure of postoffices as a payback gesture . Its stinks but that is what Unions are about nowadays.
There were roughly 2,000 post offices in Ireland 30 years ago, now it's around 1,100, do you think An Post should have kept all those PO's open?
 

Round tower

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I think the issue might be that those owning a rural house that has a footprint of say 100 + sq m or more + surrounding land pay a fraction of those who own flats or similar in Dublin.

They laugh a lot at us. But often demand the same services just the same!
Those living in the rural house pay so much every year for water as part of a group water scheme or spend to drill a wel, buy a pump and pay for the electricity, + pay fot septic tank. Hese people pay as much income tax as urban people but would pay anawful lot more tax on petrola nd diesel for the cars they need for travelling.
 
D

Deleted member 51920

If that's the way your thinking runs why not have a poll tax instead of the LPT?

No its a property tax to pay for local services (hence termed LPT) - not a poll tax
So it should be based on the size of the property - which is a good estimate on the level of consumption of those services
 

seanof

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The closure of postoffices is nothing new . The CWU the main union for postal workers is in the company's pocket. You see time and time again company spokespersons and union reps drinking together in the pubs in Dublin after important meetings. Like two boxers in a ring they shadow box to keep their bosses/members happy but afterwards drink and laugh about how they are fooling them. The union full time reps earn almost twice as much as any of their highest earning members for doing a couple of hours a week. Its a pure joke but the members are being told that without a union they have no recourse to take on the company even though the union men that represent them are to all intents company men themselves. The postmasters union is ineffective without the backing of the CWU but the CWU are bought and paid for by the company. Many deals will be done in the future by the CWU for turning a blind eye to this disgraceful closure of postoffices as a payback gesture . Its stinks but that is what Unions are about nowadays.
I know nothing of the CWU but you have a valid point here about Irish Unions in general. I'm constantly amazed by the excellent conditions enjoyed by friends who work in the US in Union recognised employment. Irish workers have been let down badly by their Unions.
 

Plebian

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But city people are massively subsidising rural communities - from farming through to roads, electricity, postal delivery, etc
It costs so much more to provide any kind of service to a guy half way up a mountain compared with in a city
How are Irish City ( lol ) people subsidising farming? Ireland is a huge recipient of EU agricultural subsidies, thereby bringing in money to be spent within the Irish economy which benefits the country as a whole. The agricultural and food sector is a significant part of the Irish economy and it's a real money economy that supports about 10% of employment in the country unlike the makey uppey bolloxology of Leprechaun Economics that counts money flowing straight through/that never touched down in Dublin for tax purposes in the "Economy".

Every red neck farmer is at the end of a supply chain that comes through Irish "Cities" and they all spend money that makes its way to providing jobs in the Cities. Everytime there's a big match, concert or such event in one of our cities that's red neck money flowing into the cities. We're all linked together in this small country.

The agri-food sector in Ireland in 2016 generated 7% of gross value added (€13.9 billion), 9.8% of Ireland’s merchandise exports and provided 8.5% of national employment. When employment in inputs, processing and marketing is included, the agri-food sector accounts for almost 10% of employment.

https://www.teagasc.ie/rural-economy/rural-economy/agri-food-business/agriculture-in-ireland/
 

devoutcapitalist

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How are Irish City ( lol ) people subsidising farming? Ireland is a huge recipient of EU agricultural subsidies, thereby bringing in money to be spent within the Irish economy which benefits the country as a whole. The agricultural and food sector is a significant part of the Irish economy and it's a real money economy that supports about 10% of employment in the country unlike the makey uppey bolloxology of Leprechaun Economics that counts money flowing straight through/that never touched down in Dublin for tax purposes in the "Economy".

Every red neck farmer is at the end of a supply chain that comes through Irish "Cities" and they all spend money that makes its way to providing jobs in the Cities. Everytime there's a big match, concert or such event in one of our cities that's red neck money flowing into the cities. We're all linked together in this small country.




https://www.teagasc.ie/rural-economy/rural-economy/agri-food-business/agriculture-in-ireland/
What percentage of farms would be viable if they weren't been propped up by EU subsidies?
 
D

Deleted member 51920

How are Irish City ( lol ) people subsidising farming? Ireland is a huge recipient of EU agricultural subsidies, thereby bring in money to be spent within the Irish economy which benefits the country as a whole. The agricultural and food sector is a significant part of the Irish economy and it's a real money economy that supports about 10% of employment in the country unlike the makey uppey bolloxology of Leprechaun Economics that counts money flowing straight through/that never touched down in Dublin for tax purposes in the "Economy".

Every red neck farmer is at the end of a supply chain that comes through Irish "Cities" and they all spend money that makes its way to providing jobs in the Cities. Everytime there's a big match, concert or such event in one of our cities that's red neck money flowing into the cities. We're all linked together in this small country.

https://www.teagasc.ie/rural-economy/rural-economy/agri-food-business/agriculture-in-ireland/
And who pays for our EU subscription which evenually comes back to Irish farmers?
Yes - Irish taxpayers which are by and large city / townie people
 

asset test

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There will always be an Urban/Rural divide.

The Healy Raes have ensured that. They are playing a big game here, and the fact that they are returned election after election doesn't endear me to their electorate either.

It just perpetuates the myth of the thick culchie (who is anything but!) being totally against the urban person who doesn't wear a cap. But pays for everything. Ah well, it will always be thus.

Healy Rs have made a mint and still will. They don't care what urban people think at all. Same applies to other rural areas too.

All politics is Local.

Shame that Urban areas are contributing though. If rural areas are that successful and they want to live the rural life, well then, pay it for yourselves!

Not going to happen though is it? And so they continue laughing at others who contribute.
 

Baron von Biffo

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How long do you think Rural Ireland would survive if Dublin became an Independent State? The economic success of Dublin props up large parts of the country.
Rural Ireland might just outlive The Independent Republic of Dublin seeing as the latter lacks an adequate water supply. ;)

The economic success of Dublin has been built in large measure on the taxes of the rest of the country and the decisions of successive governments, most notably since 2011, to favour it.
 
D

Deleted member 51920

Rural Ireland might just outlive The Independent Republic of Dublin seeing as the latter lacks an adequate water supply. ;)

The economic success of Dublin has been built in large measure on the taxes of the rest of the country and the decisions of successive governments, most notably since 2011, to favour it.
Lol
Can you back that up with any facts?
 


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