An Post closing 159 post offices



Baron von Biffo

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You referred to food security and what might happen to our food supplies in the event of being cut off?
There are many things short of war that can affect food supply. If, as I asked in my earlier post, the city dwellers in the other countries of the single market took your attitude and closed down their farming sectors where would we get our food?

In the event of shortages would our supplier countries feed their own people first or us?

We would be competing for their products with other countries so if they could get better prices elsewhere they'd be under no obligation to sell to us.

We've just come out of an economic bailout that left many disgruntled at what was demanded of us in return for funds. I suspect few of us would like to be in a position where access to essential food supplies could be a bargaining chip in future dealings with our EU partners.

Food security has been a bit of an important issue for civilisations for quite a long time now.
 
D

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And if the rest of the single market thought the same and closed down their agri sector, what do you think would happen then?
The likliehood of such crazy situations ever happening is best left to the immaginations of comedy or sci-fi films
 

Baron von Biffo

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The likliehood of such crazy situations ever happening is best left to the immaginations of comedy or sci-fi films
10 years ago anyone predicting President Trump or Brexit would have been dismissed as crazy.

It's interesting that you believe it's sensible for Ireland to close down its agri sector but crazy for other countries to do the same.
 

PBP voter

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:roll: Ireland has had a very very long history of one off housing . As much as ************************s like you might wish it we are not England . Your failures and bitterness are down to you , be thankful others feed you
I live in a once off house.

:)

But it's just on the edge of a town. I can walk to all services.

As for the history. Yes we all know that. Doesn't mean it's a good policy. :)

As for failure-its you who have failed. No wife or no kids at 56. :)
 
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Schuhart

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Then of course there's the issue of food security.
Something that we're really bad at. Seriously.
http://www.politics.ie/forum/current-affairs/265603-irish-food-security-post-brexit.html

Contrary to the prevailing opinion in Irish agriculture, both Ireland and the EU are net importers of food energy.
Plus, I don't think rural Ireland has ever thought about where veg comes from
http://www.politics.ie/forum/economy/266170-dublin-generates-one-fifth-total-economic-contribution-agri-food-nationally.html

I don't really know how much of the €1.4 billion is down to a couple of executives, and how much is down to the 8,000 other Dublin agri-food workers (including those producing 15% of national potato output, 47% of national field vegetable output and 37% of protected fruit and vegetable output).

Or how much is down to the 82.9 million hectolitres of product created in Dublin 8.
Lots of myths about rural Ireland.

I note your despair reducing you to claiming ownership of the urban water supply, as if it was something created and paid for by rural Ireland. If there's a crossover between the post office network and running pipe to the Shannon, its not obvious.
 

Baron von Biffo

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Something that we're really bad at. Seriously.Plus, I don't think rural Ireland has ever thought about where veg comes fromLots of myths about rural Ireland.

I note your despair reducing you to claiming ownership of the urban water supply, as if it was something created and paid for by rural Ireland. If there's a crossover between the post office network and running pipe to the Shannon, its not obvious.
The other evening BBC4 screened a documentary about how different people see colour differently. Being colourblind I'm aware that my colour vision is different to others but this programme suggested that even people with normal colour vision see colour differently.

Reading your post I can't help but wonder if there isn't something similar at play with how people see words.

The poster I was responding to is of the opinion that rural Ireland is a burden on Dublin. He advanced the idea that were Dublin to become an independent state it could cut off the flow of financial support to rural Ireland. The inference being that Dublin would therefore thrive while rural Ireland would die.

My response sought to aquatint him with what every junior officer is taught at the beginning of his career - the enemy can fight back. If Dublin controls the flow of money and can cut it off at will then rural Ireland controls the flow of water and can do likewise.
 

SweenyTodd

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dead babies and they cry with joy,,

I hope FG disappears up its own arseh0le,

And I used to vote for these bare faced liars,

Never, EVER , again,,
I'll never vote FG again.
 

Schuhart

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If Dublin controls the flow of money and can cut it off at will then rural Ireland controls the flow of water and can do likewise.
Tbh, your thought process is really peculiar, to an extent that I doubt you'll overcome quickly.

Rural Ireland doesn't control the flow of water. Nothing that rural dwellers do creates the supply of water. The financial earnings of Dublin are quite a different matter.

The fact that you'd equate the output of human creativity to acts of destruction is significant to me. But, like I said, it will take a long time before you even get a glimmer of self-awareness about that.

If I can attempt to drag the thread back to some kind of reality, is there any prospect of rural Ireland honestly facing up to its challenges? I'd see one contrast with (slightly similar) experience elsewhere
https://www.wdc.ie/city-led-regional-development-and-peripheral-regions-join-the-debate/

Is there a future for Rural in an Urbanizing World and Should We Care? examines how rural areas have received increased attention with the rise of right-wing populist parties in Western countries, in which a strong part of their support is rural based.
Elsewhere, rural despair has at least mobilised around a common platform. Here, we've typically just elected a large number of local nutters (like a couple of Healy-Raes, the occasional mate of Ming and a bit of Matty for good luck), reflected in the inability of rural Ireland to commit to any kind of coherent platform.

Can that change? Does rural Ireland have to be a social, economic and political failure?
 

PBP voter

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PBP voter

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https://postandparcel.info/61336/news/post-office-ltd-rolls-out-40-mobile-post-offices-for-rural-areas/

The UK has thrm.

The new vehicles are Mercedes Sprinter vans, kitted out to provide a walk-in post office on wheels, with the added facility of an accessibility lift. The mobile branches are operated by subpostmasters who can bring all of the services that their core branches provide to more isolated areas.

These services include postage of letters and parcels, personal banking such as cash withdrawals, and savings and insurance, providing accessible and convenient facilities for thousands of people every week.
 

Telstar 62

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Fianna Fáil closed 200 post offices the last time they were in
Government.

Now they're jumping up and down about 159!!!:lol:
 

Baron von Biffo

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Tbh, your thought process is really peculiar, to an extent that I doubt you'll overcome quickly.

Rural Ireland doesn't control the flow of water. Nothing that rural dwellers do creates the supply of water. The financial earnings of Dublin are quite a different matter.

The fact that you'd equate the output of human creativity to acts of destruction is significant to me. But, like I said, it will take a long time before you even get a glimmer of self-awareness about that.

If I can attempt to drag the thread back to some kind of reality, is there any prospect of rural Ireland honestly facing up to its challenges? I'd see one contrast with (slightly similar) experience elsewhereElsewhere, rural despair has at least mobilised around a common platform. Here, we've typically just elected a large number of local nutters (like a couple of Healy-Raes, the occasional mate of Ming and a bit of Matty for good luck), reflected in the inability of rural Ireland to commit to any kind of coherent platform.

Can that change? Does rural Ireland have to be a social, economic and political failure?
Though I sense defeat looming I'll make another attempt to explain it. It might help your understanding if you deal only with what I write rather than inventing your own version and attributing it to me. For instance, I did not suggest that rural dwellers 'create the supply of fresh water'.

The poster I was replying to was positing a future where Dublin declared its independence and stopped dealing with rural Ireland. This would, the poster implies, cause the death of rural Ireland.

So that's step one - a hostile act by Dublin causes a life or death crisis for rural Ireland.

That's where I moved to step two - rural Ireland fights back.

If it were facing extinction as a result of the actions of Dublin what could rural Ireland do to defend itself? The obvious thing would be to cut off Dublin's water supply. Now I'm not, you understand, saying that rural Ireland is home to dozens of water making factories. What I'm saying is that Dublin relies on fresh water from rural Ireland because that's where the water accumulates.

And there you have it. I'm not going to waste any more time trying to explain my lighthearted (though plausible) reply to what was a silly suggestion to begin with.
 

jimbohane

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Leo Varadkar recently opened a new post office in Castleknock by all accounts a state of the art new facility in the Lidl complex. The An Post News reports that the postmaster for this office is Derek Merrins who coincidentally is also the post master for An Posts Lucan post office of Ballyowen as well as being the postmaster of Thomastown in Kilkenny. Can anybody explain to me why in a time when this company is closing down small rural offices that operate at a minimum cost {most of which are located in family owned grocery shops and run by family members} that An Post has given a private individual the running of 3 of its offices? Were there no other suitable candidates as surely if he can manage one in Kilkenny as well as two in Dublin there must have been postmasters in other counties just as qualified to take on a second office rather than giving an individual three offices to manage or are there other reason for rewarding Mr Merrins with Castleknock?
 

fifilawe

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Is this man one of identical Triplets that just use one name for all three ?
Is he "super talented " and irreplaceable wherever he goes?
Does he "bring in the dosh for An Post" ?
Does he have "something on the people above him" that they want kept hidden from the public?
Is he related by blood or by marriage to someone in the hierarchy in An Post /Dept ?
But this is a daily, weekly, yearly, decade, occurrence in Ireland nepotism,cronyism, insider appointment it is why the status quo never changes and scandals go back decades before someone/something blows the lid off the pot.
 


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