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Angela Kerins resigns as head of rehab




cobhguy

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that's the theory, the practice is somewhat different
Yes it does seem to be used by some as a tool for other motives. However the Suggestions mentioned in other posts, about it being used only after an investigation, misses the whole point of what the committee is set to do.
 

artfoley56

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Yes it does seem to be used by some as a tool for other motives. However the Suggestions mentioned in other posts, about it being used only after an investigation, misses the whole point of what the committee is set to do.
the problem is that so do the committee members
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
If only it was that simple then it would be relatively easy to fix.

We have all the laws that other countries have but by and large we don't enforce them. And there's no public appetite to change that.

Take for example the traffic restrictions that applied around Trinity when the Luas works were underway. For weeks the gardaí opted for a softly softly approach and just re-directed drivers who contravened them. Then they moved to enforcement and what happened? We had absolute hysteria. The moaners were queueing up to phone Whineline and poor Duffy had a dreadful attack of the vapours over the injustice of it all.

Can you imagine a reaction like that in any other country? Can you imagine any other country where the police will detect you breaking the law, inform you that you're breaking the law and then allow you to continue breaking the law? Well that happens every day in Ireland with unaccompanied learner drivers. It will probably take a victim of an unaccompanied driver who was allowed to drive away from a checkpoint to sue the gardaí and/or the state to get that changed.

You want to build a house but know you won't get planning permission? build it anyway. In any other country you'd be forced to take it down. In Ireland you have to go through an administrative hoop called 'retention permission' and you'll get to keep it.

Housebreaking is your chosen career? No problem. Get caught doing it and for the first 50 or 60 times and you'll get a very stern talking to from a judge. After that you could be looking at a sentence of a few months. But even if you're convicted of 50 offences (and even if you did them while on bail) you'll serve your sentences concurrently so you have nothing to lose by more offending.

Can't be arsed paying your taxes? We have an Irish solution to that as well. Unlike other countries where that's a crime and you're treated like other criminals, in Ireland if you opt out of the tax system and you're caught it's extremely unlikely that you'll face anything worse than a few quid of a fine and possible embarrassment when your name appears in Swindlers list. In fact you could even get lucky and be rewarded for your criminality by getting a special tax rate that's lower than that applied to law abiding citizens.

This sort of stuff is endemic here and I can't see it changing unless closer EU integration forced us to deal with it.
I agree with the general point that the casual corruption in Ireland only ever surfaces because of external spotlights on an area. I would also agree that membership of the EU, UN and other international bodies and the accompanying treaties and agreements stemming from those memberships would inherently clash with the corruption culture at the top levels of Irish public life.

Notably Noonan lost his temper with the Troika team only when they suggested reform of cartel and closed-shop operations were a necessary reform attached to the bailout.

Pity he wasn't so keen on negotiating concessions on the debt bailout which landed on Paddy's shoulders from the blatantly corrupt and absent regulation over the banking sector.

Then again an unwritten clause in the job description for him and his like is to keep the gate open to the sort of corruption that would see jail terms elsewhere in Europe or the US.
 

artfoley56

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I agree with the general point that the casual corruption in Ireland only ever surfaces because of external spotlights on an area. I would also agree that membership of the EU, UN and other international bodies and the accompanying treaties and agreements stemming from those memberships would inherently clash with the corruption culture at the top levels of Irish public life.

Notably Noonan lost his temper with the Troika team only when they suggested reform of cartel and closed-shop operations were a necessary reform attached to the bailout.

Pity he wasn't so keen on negotiating concessions on the debt bailout which landed on Paddy's shoulders from the blatantly corrupt and absent regulation over the banking sector.

Then again an unwritten clause in the job description for him and his like is to keep the gate open to the sort of corruption that would see jail terms elsewhere in Europe or the US.
hardly surprising for noonan. given all the works that hes known for such as grace, brigid mccole et al, a pox on all his houses
 

Orbit v2

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Perhaps not. It is however, a statement of fact, which is more than can be said of your claims about Gwynn-Morgan's article.
It is fact because up to that point, it was widely believed that TDs could enquire into any thing they chose. Dáil Eireann is no more than a talking shop in that respect, like your local pub, albeit more widely reported. Nothing that they report on has any criminal or legal impact outside the doors of Leinster house. The Supreme Court in its wisdom in Abbeylara, decreed that TDs cannot engage in such enquiries lest they be seen as 'findings of fact'. To any reasonable person, a finding of fact has to be taken in the context of the body making it. You wouldn't expect the courts to intervene when some bore in your local pub declares "now that's a fact". It seems even if the Dáil were to just have enquiries which result in expressions of opinion, that wouldn't work either. Even the highly costly judge led enquiries/tribunals have been reluctant in some cases to make findings of fact, so sanctified has the word become. I'm not aware of any other Western parliament that has to work under such restrictions.
 

cobhguy

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Loss of earnings and distress caused
She has no loss of earnings and she would have to prove that pac could of know that by asking the questions it did, would of caused a reasonable person mental distress.

Not going to happen. At most a small payment for miss leading her and wasting her time by going outside their remit.
 

Northsideman

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Mar 7, 2010
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She has no loss of earnings and she would have to prove that pac could of know that by asking the questions it did, would of caused a reasonable person mental distress.

Not going to happen. At most a small payment for miss leading her and wasting her time by going outside their remit.
More than likely an out court settlement for plenty but with a gagging clause so Joe Tax Payer won't know and the legal dudes get their usual massive wedge.
 

stanley

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She has no loss of earnings and she would have to prove that pac could of know that by asking the questions it did, would of caused a reasonable person mental distress.

Not going to happen. At most a small payment for miss leading her and wasting her time by going outside their remit.
She will claim she was forced to resign from Rehab because of PAC and look for compo on her 240k salary + pension.
 

SuirView

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She will claim she was forced to resign from Rehab because of PAC and look for compo on her 240k salary + pension.
Yes,
And she'll get it!
 

cobhguy

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She will claim she was forced to resign from Rehab because of PAC and look for compo on her 240k salary + pension.
I don't see a legal claim here. She chose to resign. Her own words,
“While I have dedicated my energies and ability to growing and developing the group for the past 22 years, I am of the view that it is in the best interests of all concerned that I step down at this time.”
It looks to me that she left because it became apparent that she was overpaid and unable to justify her salary which was having a negative effect on the charity.

Unless there is proof, that she was forced to resign, because of false or incorrect facts that came from the PAC then I dont see a claim, based on loss of salary, that would succeed in Court. I am looking to forward to a written judgment.
 

stanley

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I don't see a legal claim here. She chose to resign. Her own words,
“While I have dedicated my energies and ability to growing and developing the group for the past 22 years, I am of the view that it is in the best interests of all concerned that I step down at this time.”
It looks to me that she left because it became apparent that she was overpaid and unable to justify her salary which was having a negative effect on the charity.

Unless there is proof, that she was forced to resign, because of false or incorrect facts that came from the PAC then I dont see a claim, based on loss of salary, that would succeed in Court. I am looking to forward to a written judgment.

Yes. it will be interesting but AK and Flannery were greedy and I cannot envisage they just walk away without compo.
 

stanley

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Sadly Kerins seems to have undone Rehab - she's basically made it unpopular with the typically generous citizens and now it's got a great Kerins-sized hole in its finances

It was donations from citizens through "Friends of Rehab" which allowed AK and FF to do their generous top-ups on employment packages and expenses and tell the State it was not their business.

Maybe the time has come for the State to take it over completely ensuring people like AK and FF do not gain financially from any such takeover.

It is also possible Rehab may sue the State for lost income as they tried to do previous with their "lotto" scheme, their appetite for State monies knows no bounds.

FF seems to have played a personal stormer by having AK front and centre at all times.
 

Florence

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The new CEO was on the radio today and said they had cut everything they could to balance their books. I would like to see the new revised management salaries and package. While I am sure the new person is not getting Angie's money I'm not convinced there have been real cuts at the top.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Could Rehab as an organisation sue Kerins and Flannery for the damage done to the charity's reputation during the revelations of their influence over the charity?

If Rehab can put a number on a slide in public donations then that should be sought from the people who caused the slide in donations.

I do not like the way certain organisations in public affairs in Ireland start using the 'private business' barrier to questions around governance, line up as a charity when it comes to public money and then seem to skip from one definition to another as convenient.

I think we need a defined category for charities registered as such with the Revenue and that the governance restrictions on them should be heightened.

Reforms definitely needed in this area. Including maximum terms of office to combat this nonsense of characters treating such charities as personal fiefdoms.
 

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