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Another SDLP councllor resigns. Thank you very much Mr Eastwood!



mac tíre

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The left/right of British politics is not so pronounced in Irish politics. More importantly FF are a party which will work towards a united Ireland.
You're very optimistic.
 

Mickeymac

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UK Labour have soundly refused to countenance any actual standing in NI. As for the irish Labour party, I'm sure the link up with FF is about survival. Definitely not looking good for irish Labour at the minute.


That cricket loser certainly does them no good at all.
 

Mickeymac

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You're very optimistic.


Nail on head, if FF were so concerned about the plight of Nationalists in '69, they would have sent their experienced peace keeping force into Catholic enclaves under attack by the RUC/B Specials and the Orange mobs.

IMO, if they did, Ireland would be a peaceful and united Country today.
 

cricket

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Nail on head, if FF were so concerned about the plight of Nationalists in '69, they would have sent their experienced peace keeping force into Catholic enclaves under attack by the RUC/B Specials and the Orange mobs.

IMO, if they did, Ireland would be a peaceful and united Country today.
Jaysus, what are you on ?
The Irish army was so underfunded in 69 that their budget barely covered the cost of feeding and clothing them. The provos went on the path of a peaceful and united country shortly thereafter by bombing and killing unionists into reconciliation. And highly successful they were too, weren't they ?
 

michael-mcivor

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Jaysus, what are you on ?
The Irish army was so underfunded in 69 that their budget barely covered the cost of feeding and clothing them. The provos went on the path of a peaceful and united country shortly thereafter by bombing and killing unionists into reconciliation. And highly successful they were too, weren't they ?
The Provos were successful and got rid of the 1920 government of Ireland act and the act of union and got the armed brit army off our streets- all of which was sold to the likes of you through the Peace-Process which you lapped up like you were supposed to- nothing can stop the 32 United Ireland now after the border-poll-
 

Mickeymac

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Jaysus, what are you on ?
The Irish army was so underfunded in 69 that their budget barely covered the cost of feeding and clothing them. The provos went on the path of a peaceful and united country shortly thereafter by bombing and killing unionists into reconciliation. And highly successful they were too, weren't they ?


Why continue to lie pal, if they were so underfunded, how come camps were set up immediately to Shelter, protect feed, cloth and bedding for the Catholics from the North who were burned out and intimidated from their homes?

As regard your further lies, nobody had ever heard of Provos in those days but they sure as hell knew all about the dopey sticks who could not defend those poor victims of unionist misrule and denial of civil rights which was pivotal in causing the whole damn conflict......btw never bother me again with your dopey untruths and blatant lies.
 

cricket

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The camps set up in border counties were run by the army, Red Cross and local volunteers, little if nothing coming out of the army budget. The serious underfunding of the army was the subject of a RTE programme to mark ,I think, the 20th anniversary of the outbreak of the troubles. Not alone did the army not have enough to engage militarily with anyone, if they had crossed the border, there would have been carnage of the catholic population in areas like Belfast. Of course, some here would have regarded such deaths as collateral damage in the name of the revolution, the same as Omagh, Enniskillen, etc.
On the subject of the army camps, many went from there to be put up in houses all over the country, my family's included. I would have been very young at the time, but can remember northerners staying with us for a short time on two different occasions. Others came south, were housed by Cork Corporation and went on to settle down and are still here.
 

petaljam

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The camps set up in border counties were run by the army, Red Cross and local volunteers, little if nothing coming out of the army budget. The serious underfunding of the army was the subject of a RTE programme to mark ,I think, the 20th anniversary of the outbreak of the troubles. Not alone did the army not have enough to engage militarily with anyone, if they had crossed the border, there would have been carnage of the catholic population in areas like Belfast. Of course, some here would have regarded such deaths as collateral damage in the name of the revolution, the same as Omagh, Enniskillen, etc.
On the subject of the army camps, many went from there to be put up in houses all over the country, my family's included. I would have been very young at the time, but can remember northerners staying with us for a short time on two different occasions. Others came south, were housed by Cork Corporation and went on to settle down and are still here.
Yes this is pretty much my understanding of those events too. The Red Cross fund raised much of the money, initially anyway.

I don't know anything bout Cork, but I do know people from the north who were resettled in Shannon New Town which had been set up in the 60s and was struggling to recruit residents locally.

A bit of an aside, but it's worth pointing out that there was a lot of internal movement within Northern Ireland too, we had neighbours here for four or five years who had moved back in with their parents because they had been given two hours to get out of Belfast by loyalists. I don't think they got much if any help from local authorites here either FWIW.
 

hollandia

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Yes this is pretty much my understanding of those events too. The Red Cross fund raised much of the money, initially anyway.

I don't know anything bout Cork, but I do know people from the north who were resettled in Shannon New Town which had been set up in the 60s and was struggling to recruit residents locally.

A bit of an aside, but it's worth pointing out that there was a lot of internal movement within Northern Ireland too, we had neighbours here for four or five years who had moved back in with their parents because they had been given two hours to get out of Belfast by loyalists. I don't think they got much if any help from local authorites here either FWIW.
It was at the time, and prior to the Balkans exploding in the nineties, the largest mass movement of populations since the second world war.
 

automaticforthepeople

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Nail on head, if FF were so concerned about the plight of Nationalists in '69, they would have sent their experienced peace keeping force into Catholic enclaves under attack by the RUC/B Specials and the Orange mobs.

IMO, if they did, Ireland would be a peaceful and united Country today.
If the Republican movement were concerned about peace keeping in the Catholic enclaves which were under attack they wouldn't have sold their weapons to the Free Wales Army in the mid 60's.
Decommissioning sixties style!
 

Mickeymac

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If the Republican movement were concerned about peace keeping in the Catholic enclaves which were under attack they wouldn't have sold their weapons to the Free Wales Army in the mid 60's.
Decommissioning sixties style!

See cricket and the sticks about that pal.
 

SideysGhost

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A thread about the merger of FF and the SDLP in 2019, and we get pages and pages of anti-historical demented screeching about time-travelling Provos in the 1960s :unsure:

Is there something actually medically wrong with the gammon generation? All over the world, that particluar demographic all seem to have the most bizarre beliefs and opinions, all kept afloat on an ocean of aggrieved entitlement and manufactured outrage. Nutters :roflmao:
 

belfast1981

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It will be interesting to see how FFNW do at the next elections. Council next, isn't it?
 

Prof Honeydew

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Eastwood's address to the Fianna Fáil Ardfheis doesn't inspire confidence.

Special place in hell for those calling for border poll with no united Ireland plan, says SDLPs Eastwood - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk
SDLP leader Colum Eastwood used his historic address to the Fianna Fail ard fheis to tell Sinn Fein to do their duty and restore power-sharing in Northern Ireland adding there was a "special place reserved in hell" for those calling for a border poll with no plan as to how a united Ireland would work.
He said nationalists should not be seduced into thinking Assembly was a "convenience but not a necessity" and there could be no hope of reconciliation without the devolved institutions at Stormont.
Quite apart from the fact that the SDLP left the Stormont Executive before Sinn Féin, the leader of a supposedly nationalist party trying to prevent a United Ireland from happening lacks a certain credibility as the Six Counties head into May's local elections.

Maybe Eastwood is auditioning for a role in Westminster politics where his unique talents fof pìssing off his support base would surely impress the Tories and Labour.
 

michael-mcivor

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Eastwood's address to the Fianna Fáil Ardfheis doesn't inspire confidence.

Special place in hell for those calling for border poll with no united Ireland plan, says SDLPs Eastwood - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk


Quite apart from the fact that the SDLP left the Stormont Executive before Sinn Féin, the leader of a supposedly nationalist party trying to prevent a United Ireland from happening lacks a certain credibility as the Six Counties head into May's local elections.

Maybe Eastwood is auditioning for a role in Westminster politics where his unique talents fof pìssing off his support base would surely impress the Tories and Labour.
Fianna Fáil telling the SDLP to ditch the border-poll- the electorate are going to ditch the SDLP on May 2nd-
 

Talk Back

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Eastwood's address to the Fianna Fáil Ardfheis doesn't inspire confidence.

Special place in hell for those calling for border poll with no united Ireland plan, says SDLPs Eastwood - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk


Quite apart from the fact that the SDLP left the Stormont Executive before Sinn Féin, the leader of a supposedly nationalist party trying to prevent a United Ireland from happening lacks a certain credibility as the Six Counties head into May's local elections.

Maybe Eastwood is auditioning for a role in Westminster politics where his unique talents fof pìssing off his support base would surely impress the Tories and Labour.
A few months ago Eastwood was calling for a reunification of Ireland vote.

Disappointed that Eastwood turned out to be like the rest of the politicians - a political whore.
 

Ireniall

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It seems to me that the SDLP have gone this route in order to beef up their Nationalist image. They can see that their traditional FG type leanings are cutting no ice with the electorate even if many in said electorate share those same leanings. They share the outlook but they vote for greener parties presumably because of the presence of the DUP on the other side. They can also see that SF has one up on all of the other political parties on the island in having a significant presence in both states. It is perhaps a sign of the growing de facto unification on the island and the improved prospects for a united Ireland in the near future that there is now something of a rush to make up for decades of neglect of the northern constituency- a race that FG is losing now it might be noted.

As for the people who are resigning from the SDLP from my point of view in the south, would be coming from the section of the party that did not want a united Ireland and were not interested in the promotion of Irish values and such-this is an observation rather than a criticism and I'm open to correction anyway but I feel that these people could not view FF as too right wing unless they were far left which I doubt would be many. The people who are leaving don't like the connection with the south, don't like the move towards moderate green Nationalism and are unlikely to prove a major loss to the party at the hustings once individual loyalties have faded. The SDLP had to do something to try to become more relevant and this is as good a gamble as any in my view and for us in the south they might improve FF a bit too.
 

michael-mcivor

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We have gone beyond SDLP Councillor’s now-

Former SDLP leader and former SDLP MP has suspended his membership of The SDLP Fianna Fáil to fight for a Dublin Fine Gael MEP Seat in the Upcoming European elections- The SDLP Fianna Fáil has got nothing to stop one of their own members fighting against them in a election- it’s the politics of the insane right in front of our eyes-
 

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