Another Snowflake moan

wombat

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Just read a pathetic moan in the Irish Examiner by their political correspondent about the selfishness of his parent's generation: The centre is finding it pretty hard to hold | Irish Examiner
Allowing for the fact that his parents died young, he obviously has no appreciation of life in the "good old days". His view is obviously coloured by his relatively privileged background, his parents having both been graduates and his father being a civil servant. His main moan is that their generation had permanent pensionable jobs available and were able to buy their own homes on a single salary. Not everyone managed to get a well paying job in the civil service in the "good old days", many had to emigrate, not to go backpacking in Oz for 2 years, more typically to Dagenham or navvying on the motorways - it was the time of the train to Dublin, the mailboat to Holyhead and train to London. For those who came to Dublin to work, it was the time of flatland in Rathmines, Dubliners lived at home until they left to get married or emigrated. He is partly correct about housing being more affordable but that came after saving a deposit and grovelling before the bank manager or building society. Its true that a house in Dublin could be bought for 2 or 3 years salary but it was not that easy to save a deposit. Selfishness? who does he think paid the 60%+ taxes to pay for his education?
 


GDPR

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He has a point. Generation X and to lesser extent the Baby Boomers did wreck things for most people and getting back seems like an almost impossible task.
 

Wascurito

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This up and coming generation will have it more difficult, I think. It's partly due to mismanagement by those born in the 1960s and 1970s. There should have been more planning for the demographic issues now hitting western societies of ageing populations and low birth rates.
 

GDPR

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Also the Cultural damage that Generation X did particularly in the South of Ireland is almost going to be impossible to repair.
 

USER1234

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Also the Cultural damage that Generation X did particularly in the South of Ireland is almost going to be impossible to repair.
Can you please explain what you mean by the cultural damage done by generation x (with examples)?
 

wombat

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This up and coming generation will have it more difficult, I think.
The opportunities to make a good living in Ireland have never been as great. Its a small island and still uncrowded compared to the rest of Europe.
 

Niall996

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IT's never been easier to set up an entrepreneurial business. The market likes niche brands, boutique local offerings. The digital era enables everyone to set up store fir nothing and target a global audience. The civil service cannot be used as a reflection of a past generation. That was and continues to be an extraordinarily privileged space.
 

GDPR

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Can you please explain what you mean by the cultural damage done by generation x (with examples)?
Illegal drug abuse becoming normalized and the whole disgusting car alarms passing as music dance thing. The disparagement of the concepts of duty and veneration which went along side and nurtured a disappearance of seriousness from the culture at large. The rise of vapid individualism. The list goes on and on. Thankfully I was born in Northern Ireland in the 1990s so the Troubles as evil as they were forbade the most of the decadence that set in during the 80s and 90s across the rest of these Isles.
 

Wascurito

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The opportunities to make a good living in Ireland have never been as great. Its a small island and still uncrowded compared to the rest of Europe.
I don't know. Something is different. I had a house bought and the mortgage paid off when I was 35. I was unusual in that but not incredibly unusual.

I see an unemployment rate that's supposed to be 6% and yet I know more than a few who can't get a decent job. They get taken on for a few months and then are let go.

The standard of living is higher but, for younger people, it seems to be harder to do more basic things like setting up a home, having a family and providing for said family.
 

Wascurito

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Can you please explain what you mean by the cultural damage done by generation x (with examples)?
Neil Hannon explains it all.

(There's nothing wrong with a woman having two men.....!)

[video=youtube;cNfTnCN9d00]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNfTnCN9d00[/video]
 

wombat

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"Snowflake" has quickly become a meaningless word.
It was always meaningless in the context used but it is a convenient shorthand to use for privileged moaners who think that hardship is finding that stamping their foot and crying "I want" no longer works.
 

toughbutfair

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In the 1980s we had no house phone as couldn't afford one. Few people today cannot afford a phone, most teenagers even have one.

Based on that alone I'd say the 80s were tougher
 

edwin

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Illegal drug abuse becoming normalized and the whole disgusting car alarms passing as music dance thing. The disparagement of the concepts of duty and veneration which went along side and nurtured a disappearance of seriousness from the culture at large. The rise of vapid individualism. The list goes on and on. Thankfully I was born in Northern Ireland in the 1990s so the Troubles as evil as they were forbade the most of the decadence that set in during the 80s and 90s across the rest of these Isles.
I hate to break it to you but I saw lots of this type of decadence in the north as early as the 90s....
 

talkingshop

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I don't know. Something is different. I had a house bought and the mortgage paid off when I was 35. I was unusual in that but not incredibly unusual.

I see an unemployment rate that's supposed to be 6% and yet I know more than a few who can't get a decent job. They get taken on for a few months and then are let go.

The standard of living is higher but, for younger people, it seems to be harder to do more basic things like setting up a home, having a family and providing for said family.
Yes, massively, massively, higher I would say.
 

GDPR

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I hate to break it to you but I saw lots of this type of decadence in the north as early as the 90s....
Hardly on the same extent. The next Troubles when they happen will be far more brutal than the last because a lot of "That Which Restraineth" has been removed.
 

GDPR

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Yes, massively, massively, higher I would say.
I'm not so sure at all. Also security is much more important than cash in the bank. Insecurity can be crippling on all sorts of levels. Increasingly young people cannot afford to drink in Pubs while as in Generation X's time people on the dole could be regulars in them. The key thing though about securing a home is very important. Technology has advanced but I'm not sure that the "Living Standard" has.
 

JimmyFoley

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In the 1980s we had no house phone as couldn't afford one. Few people today cannot afford a phone, most teenagers even have one.

Based on that alone I'd say the 80s were tougher
If a person could go back to experience the standard of living that the great majority in Ireland had in the 80s, he wouldn't last 10 minutes.

People have such short memories.
 


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