Are any of our regular daily posters disabled?

nationalsday

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Just wondering.





I'd say that there must be both good and bad aspects though. Sitting inside and not getting out - not so good. Getting stuff off your chest with a nice hearty polemic to the world - good
 


Dame_Enda

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Dec 14, 2011
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Asperger Syndrome. Its on the autism spectrum and I am on disability allowance. Its high functioning autism but 85% with it are unemployed.
 
D

Deleted member 45466

Maybe you are just ignorant?

Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger's, is a developmental disorder characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and nonverbal communication, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests.

Am I the only one who thinks that anyone could successfully claim to be suffering with this "terrible" affliction?

Particularly those "suffering" from CFL?
 

ger12

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Lumpy Talbot

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No
I've worked with people who are on the autism scale and are high-performing autistic. It just requires some sensitivity to things such as working environment- office noises other people can just phase out can be very distracting to people on the scale.

Communications have to be very clear and the provision of context to any request is important.

Basically if you lay the groundwork properly and reassure people with autism that they are on the right track and they feel confident in checking in with you that they won't be criticised for it it can be remarkably rewarding. Tasks requiring singleminded perserverance can be demotivating for other people but people with autism can find them very rewarding and no trouble as long as they know others are happy for them to be doing what they are doing.

I've found that people on the scale are excellent at working with large datasets and can provide amazing insights when the purpose of the task is shared and agreed.

Always found it something of a pleasure in my working life. I know one very high performing chap on the scale used to refer to me as his 'translator' which was quite a compliment.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Read an article not so long ago that Goldman Sachs actively seek out high performing autistic employees for certain roles.

They've put some thought into providing an encouraging environment- they keep them well away from the A55hole Division for example and leave them in charge of things like corporate library and information that needs to be held for a long time and needs to be indexed and catalogued for retrieval.

They've realised that high performing autistics are particularly motivated by ensuring things are in the right place and that they don't like a mess so will be heavily motivated toward order.

The bank benefits and from what some of the people with autism were saying it works for them. A bulllying boss who doesn't exhibit patience in communication is a nightmare for autistics. Those who do know how to work with HP autistics gain an amazing resource and the main task is to protect them from abrupt a55holes who don't understand the way to engage them.
 

Sister Mercedes

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Dec 19, 2011
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Just wondering.





I'd say that there must be both good and bad aspects though. Sitting inside and not getting out - not so good. Getting stuff off your chest with a nice hearty polemic to the world - good
I realize you write your posts in a Brother typewriter. But the rest of us have access to mobile technology so posting on here is not an indication of being stuck inside.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
The guy who used to call me his 'translator' is an amazing fellow. He holds a doctorate in literature which he funded himself by working on fruit farms and basically scrimping on non-essentials such as food and a decent place to live. Can be amazingly single-minded.

I've seen the same fellow who hates being in a crowded room because there are too many confusing communication signals actually work on his laptop in the corner of a nightclub with high volume house music banging out of nearby speakers. His concentration levels are so high under conditions no-one else can work in that he won't even notice the volume or music or people.

He likes running his own little hedgefund as well off betting odds- a bit like CityIndex and he has this system which he thoroughly enjoys exploring. Only bets small money as the money doesn't interest him so much as proving his system.

Did well at Cheltenham recently but to him doing well is proving his theory- the money is neither here nor there.

I rescued him from a boss who was a real dunce and didn't understand him at all or how easy it was to engage him in the right way. She didn't understand why he would become faint at times in rooms with a lot of people- mainly because he was becoming overwhelmed in trying to understand too much communication in one place. Soon as we got him out of that situation and changed his environment a bit he opened up to genius level in what we were doing.
 
D

Deleted member 45466

I've worked with people who are on the autism scale and are high-performing autistic. It just requires some sensitivity to things such as working environment- office noises other people can just phase out can be very distracting to people on the scale.

Communications have to be very clear and the provision of context to any request is important.

Basically if you lay the groundwork properly and reassure people with autism that they are on the right track and they feel confident in checking in with you that they won't be criticised for it it can be remarkably rewarding. Tasks requiring singleminded perserverance can be demotivating for other people but people with autism can find them very rewarding and no trouble as long as they know others are happy for them to be doing what they are doing.

I've found that people on the scale are excellent at working with large datasets and can provide amazing insights when the purpose of the task is shared and agreed.

Always found it something of a pleasure in my working life. I know one very high performing chap on the scale used to refer to me as his 'translator' which was quite a compliment.
Strange that 85% of them are on the dole.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Strange that 85% of them are on the dole.
Autism is a spectrum, not a fixed point. There are many who cannot work and cannot relate to the requirements of the working environment.

Those I've worked with are high performing autistic who can be absolutely astonishing when engaged in the right way. For some there is no way to engage them in the workforce.

There will also be of course the historical overhang of prejudice against people with autism and with employers who don't want anything different in their workforce or anyone who requires more patience and an investment in time and energy beyond the average.
 


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