Are Sinn Féin now trying to claim the Irish langauge?

TheField

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We've seen Sinn Féin in the past trying to wrap themselves in the Proclamation and Tricolour, to claim that political territory. The recent spat with the DUP over 'cash for ash' has seen them prominently raising a minor cut to grants for children to attend Gaeltacht areas as in http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/42951

I've heard this mentioned several times by Sinn Féin people in last few days. Are they trying now to wrap themselves in the Irish language and use it as a political football? If so, I wouldn't have thought this was in any way in the best interests of the language.

We've also seen the growth of Gaeilscoileanna in the south and whilst people send their children there for many reasons, there is no doubt a core that subscribes for political reasons.

God help us down here in the Republic, if this Taliban ever got into power here.
 


ruserious

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They are in power in the south. Cork city council for example.
 

Fullforward

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We've seen Sinn Féin in the past trying to wrap themselves in the Proclamation and Tricolour, to claim that political territory. The recent spat with the DUP over 'cash for ash' has seen them prominently raising a minor cut to grants for children to attend Gaeltacht areas as in http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/42951

I've heard this mentioned several times by Sinn Féin people in last few days. Are they trying now to wrap themselves in the Irish language and use it as a political football? If so, I wouldn't have thought this was in any way in the best interests of the language.

We've also seen the growth of Gaeilscoileanna in the south and whilst people send their children there for many reasons, there is no doubt a core that subscribes for political reasons.



God help us down here in the Republic, if this Taliban ever got into power here.
When was that?
 

Don Wan

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I read your own link for the answer.

"The Irish language belongs to everyone, threatens no-one and must be respected."
 

Fullforward

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We've seen Sinn Féin in the past trying to wrap themselves in the Proclamation and Tricolour, to claim that political territory. The recent spat with the DUP over 'cash for ash' has seen them prominently raising a minor cut to grants for children to attend Gaeltacht areas as in http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/42951

I've heard this mentioned several times by Sinn Féin people in last few days. Are they trying now to wrap themselves in the Irish language and use it as a political football? If so, I wouldn't have thought this was in any way in the best interests of the language.

We've also seen the growth of Gaeilscoileanna in the south and whilst people send their children there for many reasons, there is no doubt a core that subscribes for political reasons.

God help us down here in the Republic, if this Taliban ever got into power here.
Who from?
 

Ruff says Flaherty

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We've seen Sinn Féin in the past trying to wrap themselves in the Proclamation and Tricolour, to claim that political territory. The recent spat with the DUP over 'cash for ash' has seen them prominently raising a minor cut to grants for children to attend Gaeltacht areas as in http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/42951

I've heard this mentioned several times by Sinn Féin people in last few days. Are they trying now to wrap themselves in the Irish language and use it as a political football? If so, I wouldn't have thought this was in any way in the best interests of the language.

We've also seen the growth of Gaeilscoileanna in the south and whilst people send their children there for many reasons, there is no doubt a core that subscribes for political reasons.

God help us down here in the Republic, if this Taliban ever got into power here.
Tiocadh ar Lá
 

hollandia

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We've seen Sinn Féin in the past trying to wrap themselves in the Proclamation and Tricolour, to claim that political territory. The recent spat with the DUP over 'cash for ash' has seen them prominently raising a minor cut to grants for children to attend Gaeltacht areas as in http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/42951

I've heard this mentioned several times by Sinn Féin people in last few days. Are they trying now to wrap themselves in the Irish language and use it as a political football? If so, I wouldn't have thought this was in any way in the best interests of the language.

We've also seen the growth of Gaeilscoileanna in the south and whilst people send their children there for many reasons, there is no doubt a core that subscribes for political reasons.

God help us down here in the Republic, if this Taliban ever got into power here.
Spectacularly missing the point, field. The cut (and more importantly, the timing and manner in which it was carried out) only served to underline the fact that the DUP were not in the slightest bit interested in working with their partners in government.

To summarise - Arlene would not stand aside to allow an investigation into a possible 500million loss due to incompetence/corruption.
To rub salt in the wounds - Paul Givan cut the bursary on the Liofa project on Christmas Eve in a short two sentence statement. One of those sentences was Merry Christmas and a happy new year.

As you know, an Irish language act is one of SFs key demands, and has been since 1998 (part of the GFA). Unionism has scuppered this at everyturn, and indeed nixed anything "Irish" up to and including renaming the fisheries patrol boat from "Banríonn na hUladh" to it's english equivalent.

Don't be too stupid to think that the resignation is to do with the irish language (though that's a very small part of it). It's to do with a lack of willingness to work in a collegiate fashion, it's to do with possible corruption (see also Red Sky and NAMA), and it's to do with a basic lack of respect and manners. And it's to do with Arrogance. Lot's of Arrogance.
 

PBP voter

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They can't claim it because very few of them and their fanboys can speak it.
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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given SF's commitment to multiculturalism.....adopting the underdog to stand against the Anglo/UK elites.....i reckon the future languages for Sinn Fein will be Nigerian/Romanian/Syrian.

how do you say ''our day will come'' in those languages when at the election hustings ?

and in terms of numbers of votes, the bumper crop is the catholic Polish. Sinn Fein will be wrapping themselves in that flag and opposing abortion to beat the marching band.
 
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ShoutingIsLeadership

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given SF's commitment to multiculturalism.....adopting the underdog to stand against the Anglo/UK elites.....i reckon the future languages for Sinn Fein will be Nigerian/Romanian/Syrian.

how do you say ''our day will come'' in those languages when at the election hustings ?

Nigerian?
 
O

Oscurito

I follow a few Irish language Facebook pages and - going by the contributions - there seems to be a greater number of people up north who are actively political about the language than anywhere else.

Sinn Féin is the party for anyone who wants to do this in NI and that might be contributing to the opinion put forward by the OP.
 

TheField

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Is the OP actually serious?
Quite serious - to this observer, it is clear that the language issue has been dragged into the much more serious issue of the Renewable Heating Incentive scandal. I've heard it used by Sinn Féin spokespeople several times to justify their dissatisfaction. They are using the language as a political football and the message is clear - 'We are the party that stands up for the Irish language'. My advice to them is to lay off this rhetoric. Do not entangle the Irish language in your differences with the DUP.

I follow a few Irish language Facebook pages and - going by the contributions - there seems to be a greater number of people up north who are actively political about the language than anywhere else.

Sinn Féin is the party for anyone who wants to do this in NI and that might be contributing to the opinion put forward by the OP.
Quite.
 

Supra

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We've seen Sinn Féin in the past trying to wrap themselves in the Proclamation and Tricolour, to claim that political territory. The recent spat with the DUP over 'cash for ash' has seen them prominently raising a minor cut to grants for children to attend Gaeltacht areas as in http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/42951

I've heard this mentioned several times by Sinn Féin people in last few days. Are they trying now to wrap themselves in the Irish language and use it as a political football? If so, I wouldn't have thought this was in any way in the best interests of the language.

We've also seen the growth of Gaeilscoileanna in the south and whilst people send their children there for many reasons, there is no doubt a core that subscribes for political reasons.

God help us down here in the Republic, if this Taliban ever got into power here.
Won't someone think of the Children!!!!
 


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