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Are teacher training colleges improving teachers' innate ability to teach? New proven classroom teaching methods offer hope.

patslatt

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Are teacher training colleges improving teachers' innate ability to teach? New proven classroom teaching methods offer hope.

See http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21700383-what-matters-schools-teachers-fortunately-teaching-can-be-taught-how-make-good and Teaching the teachers | The Economist

Criticisms in the above article of international teacher training are sceptical:

"...it can be easier to earn a teaching qualification than to make the grades American colleges require of their athletes."

"...none of Australia's 450 education training programmes has ever had to prove its impact..."

"Much of what passes for "professional development" is woeful...a study in England found that only 1% of training courses enabled teachers to turn bad practices into good teaching."

But the potential for applying new empirically proven classroom teaching methods offers hope for the future:

"Rather than spending their time musing on the meaning of education,he and his peers have been drilled in the craft of the classroom."

"Most of Mr Lemov's techniques are meant to increase the number of pupils in a class who are thinking...Techniques such as his "cold call" and "turn and talk" ,where pupils have to explain their thoughts quickly to a peer, give the kinds of cognitive workouts common in classrooms in Shanghai and Singapore, which regularly top international comparisons."
 
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Texal Tom

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I did the h. Dip about 20 years ago. The teaching placement was ok but much of what we did in Ucc was either not very relevant or totally irrevelant to teaching.

We did history of education - I found this interesting but really it doesn't make you are good or bad teacher
Curriculum development - most boring load of nonesense... As teachers we don't develop curriculum
Sociology - found interesting but would not have any impact on your teaching
Psychology - ok but it focuses too much on young children and we were second level
Philosophy - found it interesting but again did not really have any impact in the classroom

We did teaching studies - this was good - practical tips for classroom management / dealing with parents / staff room politics - the guy was a teacher who came n to talk to us and share his wisdom
Micro teaching - good as you got a chance to look at yourself on and get peer and lecturer feedback and also,to see how others operated -
We did a module on active teaching and this was good

It was enough to get you going but not really enough to really train you... Maybe at primary level it's different! I found the academic levels fairly average in terms of research and approach... I remember that one about you remember 10% of what you hear 30% of who you see and.... Utter nonesence

I can't believe that was 20 years ago!!!!
 

Rubashov1917

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No, most of recent are as thick as pig ************************, to whom academic teaching is a secondary consideration to coaching school GAA.
 

Glenshane4

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"Rather than spending their time musing on the meaning of education,"
That sounds like a very accurate description of the PGCE course which I completed. It was an extremely unpleasant, time comsuming course - an obstacle course of unpleasant and irrelevant tasks. None of it related to teaching. It was all about education.
 

Notachipanoaktree

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That sounds like a very accurate description of the PGCE course which I completed. It was an extremely unpleasant, time comsuming course - an obstacle course of unpleasant and irrelevant tasks. None of it related to teaching. It was all about education.
Firstly you need somebody with an innate ability to teach. How that DNA is passed from politician to postulant I haven't figured out yet. I'm working on it.
 

Feckkit

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That sounds like a very accurate description of the PGCE course which I completed. It was an extremely unpleasant, time comsuming course - an obstacle course of unpleasant and irrelevant tasks. None of it related to teaching. It was all about education.
Bring Back The Hyphen! (And the anti-typo spray!!)
 

Feckkit

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See How to make a good teacher | The Economist and Teaching the teachers | The Economist

Criticisms in the above article of international teacher training are sceptical: "...it can be easier to earn a teaching qualification than to make the grades American colleges require of their athletes. "...none of Australia's 450 education training programmes has ever had to prove its impact..." "Much of what passes for "professional development" is woeful...a study in England found that only 1% of training courses enabled teachers to turn bad practices into good teaching." But the potential for applying new empirically proven classroom teaching methods offers hope for the future: "Rather than spending their time musing on the meaning of education,he and his peers have been drilled in the craft of the classroom." "Most of Mr Lemov's techniques are meant to increase the number of pupils in a class who are thinking...Techniques such as his "cold call" and "turn and talk" ,where pupils have to explain their thoughts quickly to a peer, give the kinds of cognitive workouts common in classrooms in Shanghai and Singapore, which regularly top international comparisons."

I don't know how or why teachers put up with this oul bullsh!t:

"......One American study found that in a single year’s teaching the top 10% of teachers impart three times as much learning to their pupils as the worst 10% do. Another suggests that, if black pupils were taught by the best quarter of teachers, the gap between their achievement and that of white pupils would disappear..."




We never hear about "the worst 10%" of pilots, or company directors, or TV commentators.
 

patslatt

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I did the h. Dip about 20 years ago. The teaching placement was ok but much of what we did in Ucc was either not very relevant or totally irrevelant to teaching.

We did history of education - I found this interesting but really it doesn't make you are good or bad teacher
Curriculum development - most boring load of nonesense... As teachers we don't develop curriculum
Sociology - found interesting but would not have any impact on your teaching
Psychology - ok but it focuses too much on young children and we were second level
Philosophy - found it interesting but again did not really have any impact in the classroom

We did teaching studies - this was good - practical tips for classroom management / dealing with parents / staff room politics - the guy was a teacher who came n to talk to us and share his wisdom
Micro teaching - good as you got a chance to look at yourself on and get peer and lecturer feedback and also,to see how others operated -
We did a module on active teaching and this was good

It was enough to get you going but not really enough to really train you... Maybe at primary level it's different! I found the academic levels fairly average in terms of research and approach... I remember that one about you remember 10% of what you hear 30% of who you see and.... Utter nonesence

I can't believe that was 20 years ago!!!!
Apart from teaching studies on school and classroom practices, the courses you listed are intellectually demanding, contributing to a well rounded education. That should improve a teacher's communication skills, among other things.
 

patslatt

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I don't know how or why teachers put up with this oul bullsh!t:

"......One American study found that in a single year’s teaching the top 10% of teachers impart three times as much learning to their pupils as the worst 10% do. Another suggests that, if black pupils were taught by the best quarter of teachers, the gap between their achievement and that of white pupils would disappear..."

We never hear about "the worst 10%" of pilots, or company directors, or TV commentators.
THE SACK

Teachers generally can't be sacked, thanks to powerful trade unions. What do you think happens to the following business people:
-Pilots who fail to meet the high health standards of the profession
-TV commentators whose ratings drop off
-Company directors in takeovers of their companies or whose contributions fail to impress the business owners

Logically, in the interest of student education the teaching profession should be subjected to the same pressure and job turnover as agents in sales "where many are called but few are chosen". A benchmark of required student performances could be based on results of the best 20% of teachers.Salaries would have to be raised dramatically to attract teachers capable of that. In practice, trade unions would not allow the high staff turnover needed to cull teachers falling short of the benchmarks.

What kind of teacher salary increases would be needed for the hypothetical sales model of teaching? Huge salary and bonus differences occur in professions with characteristics of winner take all eg acting profession, legal and accounting profession, sales agents and traders. Acting rewards are like a lottery. The top 20% or so in those other professions earn maybe 80% of the total industry pay, which is typical of the 80/20 rule, aka Pareto's law. This suggests a maximum pay increase of 300% ie (80% x 5)/1.
 
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davidcameron

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THE SACK

Teachers generally can't be sacked, thanks to powerful trade unions. What do you think happens to the following business people:
-Pilots who fail to meet the high health standards of the profession
-TV commentators whose ratings drop off
-Company directors in takeovers of their companies or whose contributions fail to impress the business owners

What kind of salary and bonus differences occur in professions with characteristics of winner take all eg acting profession, legal and accounting profession, sales agents and traders? Acting rewards are like a lottery. The top 20% or so in those other professions earn maybe 80% of the total industry pay, which is typical of the 80/20 rule, aka Pareto's law.

Logically, in the interest of student education the teaching profession should be subjected to the same pressure and job turnover as agents in sales "where many are called but few are chosen". A benchmark of required student performances could be based on results of the best 20% of teachers.Salaries would have to be raised dramatically to attract teachers capable of that,possibly by 50%. In practice, trade unions would not allow the high staff turnover needed to cull teachers falling short of the benchmarks.
Have you not heard of the Teaching Council?
 

Shannon73

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Teaching practice was a major part of teacher training in the good old days. As a matter of fact it meant dismissal from the Training College if a student didn't perform in the classroom. A final chance was given; that was that. Quite right, too, - knowing more than Einstein wasn't much use if one couldn't get the facts to the pupils.

Many H.Dip courses did very little to promote the skills of teaching. Maynooth College (under an Bráthair Ó Súilleabhán) was an exception. He had talked the talk AND walked the walkin his own life; a genius. A Course (in an another College) conducted through Gaeilge, was a joke.

Nowadays, one course is conducted through the internet - untouched by hand and as helpful as the automatic voices on phone lines who cause more trouble than help.
The latest system of leaving a trainee in charge of a class for a term (heaven help us) is unfair to the trainee and a savage injustice to the class pupils who may never make up for so much time wasted.

The art of teaching should take precedence over all else.Bad teachers are a disaster and, unfortunately, there are far too many of them. They may have First Class degrees but their students will have to plough through subjects that are made difficult by people who cannot impart knowledge.

It's serious business as many have found to their cost.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Classroom management and discipline are vital skills.

Sometimes a teacher trains in a totally different type of school to the one she ends up in.

My H Dip was in a very academic school where staying on top of your subject and teaching it to a very high level, were key. The students were quiet and studious, although demanding from an academic point of view

It in no way prepared me for the school I teach in now.

In my present school my entire energy is taken up with managing the behaviour of my behaviourally-challenged students. I have learned many skills on-the-job to keep the kids respectful and on task.
Otherwise nobody would learn anything.

Keeping a calm, ordered classroom where students feel safe and where they can hear and learn, is extremely important. Everything else flows from that.

Yet in my day at least, this was not emphasised in training
The presumption was during the H Dip lectures that your pupils were avid for knowledge and that all classroom problems could be solved by some gimmick to help explain a teaching point, or to temporarily catch their attention.

Many teachers will end up in classrooms where some of the pupils don't want to be there, have no interest in most subjects, and have no intention of submitting homework--or even of sitting down in class and not sneering, shouting or interrupting.

Dealing with that reality should form a key part of teacher training--because most schools will have a cohort, or even a class, of these disaffected, difficult students, and the teacher will be left with the responsibility of trying to cope.
 

Feckkit

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THE SACK

Teachers generally can't be sacked, thanks to powerful trade unions. What do you think happens to the following business people:
-Pilots who fail to meet the high health standards of the profession
-TV commentators whose ratings drop off
-Company directors in takeovers of their companies or whose contributions fail to impress the business owners
DO WE REFER TO THESE PEOPLE AS BEING "THE WORST 10%"

No.


DO WE REFER TO THEM AS "BAD".

No again.


SO WHY DO WE SUBJECTIVELY REFER TO A RANDOM SELECTION OF TEACHERS AS BEING "BAD" OR "THE WORST 10%"

Because we can get away with it.
 

patslatt

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DO WE REFER TO THESE PEOPLE AS BEING "THE WORST 10%"

No.


DO WE REFER TO THEM AS "BAD".

No again.


SO WHY DO WE SUBJECTIVELY REFER TO A RANDOM SELECTION OF TEACHERS AS BEING "BAD" OR "THE WORST 10%"

Because we can get away with it.
Internal statistical reports of employers are used to rank performances of pilots and TV commentators and they use phrases like top decile or bottom decile. Phrases like "the worst 10%" are used by journalists to convey statistics to the general public unacquainted with statistical jargon.
 

Notachipanoaktree

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I think I can say at this stage. We the people, all of us, have had our belly full of single interest groups grabbing the limelight, the jobs, the cash, the future, the past.

Teachers, politicians, FF, FG, LB, SF, ISIS, LGBT, Capitalists, Fascists, Communists, Neo-Liberals, Catholics, Prodistants, Nationalists, Unionists, Irish et al.
 

Notachipanoaktree

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Innovation is not the result of the answer to the question. Innovation is the result of the search for the answer to the question. The question as to why the apple falls has led to all the incredible developments in human knowledge, ability, and understanding you see around you. We still don''t know exactly why the apple falls (yet).

The 'client' is only happy when he/she is 'told' gravity did it, only a bushy tail can deliver that answer with conviction. (bushy tail=beloved of all gangs) Only an expert 'teacher' can impart the desire for knowledge to the 'student'. If the objective is to prepare a set of clones and donkeys for those who would cage the status quo from within, then so be it. Prepare to meet thy Julius Caesar.

Arguably, The Library of Alexandria is most famous for having been burned down resulting in the loss of many scrolls and books; its destruction has become a symbol for the loss of cultural knowledge. Sources differ on who was responsible for its destruction and when it occurred. The library may in truth have suffered several fires over many years. Possible occasions for the partial or complete destruction of the Library of Alexandria include a fire set by the army of Julius Caesar in 48 BC and an attack by Aurelian in the 270s AD.
 
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patslatt

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Innovation is not the result of the answer to the question. Innovation is the result of the search for the answer to the question. The question as to why the apple falls has led to all the incredible developments in human knowledge, ability, and understanding you see around you. We still don''t know exactly why the apple falls (yet).

The 'client' is only happy when he/she is told gravity did it, only a bushy tail can deliver that answer with conviction. (bushy tail=beloved of all gangs) Only an expert 'teacher' can impart the desire for knowledge to the 'student'. If the objective is to prepare a set of clones and donkeys for those who would cage the status quo from within, then so be it. Prepare to meet thy Julius Caesar.

Arguably, The Library of Alexandria is most famous for having been burned down resulting in the loss of many scrolls and books; its destruction has become a symbol for the loss of cultural knowledge. Sources differ on who was responsible for its destruction and when it occurred. The library may in truth have suffered several fires over many years. Possible occasions for the partial or complete destruction of the Library of Alexandria include a fire set by the army of Julius Caesar in 48 BC and an attack by Aurelian in the 270s AD.
What has that got to do with the price of tea in China?
 

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