Are the Irish entitled to charter Derry and Belfast?

Talk Back

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You've told me a nice fairytale about a magical kingdom.
Here fool - you better go back in time and tell Henry II then.

Even the enemy king of England, Henry II, who signed the treaty of Windsor (1175) with the High King of Ireland, Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair - recognised the country Ireland, as being one entity - and the Kingdom of Ireland, as having one High King - Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair.

But you being the idiot that you are, hundreds of years later - do not.
 


Talk Back

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So, the historical fact remains - the king of England, Henry II, signed the treaty of Windsor (1175) with the High King of Ireland, Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair - which recognised the country Ireland, as being one entity - and the Kingdom of Ireland, as having one High King.

Treaties are signed between Heads of State and Countries.

And England broke the treaty - making the treaty null and void.

England has NO mandate in Ireland - it never did.
 

rem81

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So, the historical fact remains - the king of England, Henry II, signed the treaty of Windsor (1175) with the High King of Ireland, Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair - which recognised the country Ireland, as being one entity - and the Kingdom of Ireland, as having one High King.

Treaties are signed between Heads of State and Countries.

And England broke the treaty - making the treaty null and void.

England has NO mandate in Ireland - it never did.
the historic fact remains u are a paddy thicko and Ireland would be Somalia without the glorious UK
 

Talk Back

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No historical facts there. Unicorns and rainbows.
You only think that because you are a moron.

The king of England, Henry II, did not sign the treaty with a multitude of Irish Ri's - he signed the treaty of Windsor (1175) with the High King of Ireland, Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair - which recognised the country Ireland, as being one entity - and the Kingdom of Ireland, as having one High King.

In order for England to make treaties lawful with other countries, England, as in Ireland's case, had to legally recognise the reality that Ireland was one Nation and Kingdom ruled by one undisputed and unopposed High King.

England recognised this fact before England signed the treaty of Windsor (1175) - it had to in order to sign the treaty.

It really happened - suck it up.
 

runwiththewind

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the historic fact remains u are a paddy thicko and Ireland would be Somalia without the glorious UK
Except Ireland became Somalia like under UK rule.
 

londonpride

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So, the historical fact remains - the king of England, Henry II, signed the treaty of Windsor (1175) with the High King of Ireland, Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair - which recognised the country Ireland, as being one entity - and the Kingdom of Ireland, as having one High King.

Treaties are signed between Heads of State and Countries.

And England broke the treaty - making the treaty null and void.

England has NO mandate in Ireland - it never did.
Neither do the Ulster Scots who have the Tories by the Balls now, trying to preserve their position. Shinflake should be in Westminster rattling sabres in support of the nationalist community .
 

londonpride

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Except Ireland became Somalia like under UK rule.
Have been to Somalia and can tell you that Somalia is riddled with superstitious cultures just like Ireland was and in some circumstances still is.

Culture like religion is enslavement and denies freedom of expression and the ability to think logically.
 

parentheses

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No, but what we think go as Gaelic evolved from an earlier language, hypothesised as Proto-Gaelic / Primitive Irish, which dates, at the earliest, to the fourth century. At that point, any previous forms of the language do not originate from the islands that now have become Ireland, the UK, etc.

Gaelic languages did not appear from nothing in Ireland. They came from other parts of the world. They definitely do not have any prehistoric roots in Ireland.

Proto-Indo-European did NOT evolve in Ireland.
It used to be thought that the Celts came to Ireland in about 600BC.

However the genetic evidence now suggests Indo European people came to Ireland before 2000BC.

So it is likely the Gaelic laanguage evolved in Ireland.
 

Niall996

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Have been to Somalia and can tell you that Somalia is riddled with superstitious cultures just like Ireland was and in some circumstances still is.

Culture like religion is enslavement and denies freedom of expression and the ability to think logically.

There is nothing particularly superstitious about Ireland that you won't find all over the world. Ireland has it's share of eejits just like everyone else has.
 

death or glory

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There is nothing particularly superstitious about Ireland that you won't find all over the world. Ireland has it's share of eejits just like everyone else has.
As any of Niall's friends will no doubt verify for you.
 

runwiththewind

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Have been to Somalia and can tell you that Somalia is riddled with superstitious cultures just like Ireland was and in some circumstances still is.

Culture like religion is enslavement and denies freedom of expression and the ability to think logically.
So what's your excuse for the lack of logical thinking? Initially you were the descendant of famine refugees, then you were the descendant from men who fought in the WOI and civil war. Now you were born in Ireland.

Meh.
 

death or glory

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recedite

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The simple answer is that the land belongs to the people who live in it.
Indigenous people should resist colonisation at the time, if they don't like the implications of losing ownership of their land.
There's no point complaining about it later.

In the case of Derry, although it has built by the planters, it has been colonised in modern times by nationalists. Anyone who knows the place will be aware that the remaining planters now live in outlying rural areas, or have retreated to rough housing estates on the outskirts such as the aptly named New Buildings.
Colonisation cuts both ways.
 

londonpride

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So what's your excuse for the lack of logical thinking? Initially you were the descendant of famine refugees, then you were the descendant from men who fought in the WOI and civil war. Now you were born in Ireland.

Meh.
You obviously have great difficulty in comprehending posts , Yes i was born in Ireland ,West of Galway ,Ended up in Orphanage ,Sexually Abused by gaelic teacher and two Priests As others were also. Taken out of orphanage by relatives . through Family i learned about the history of family involved in WOI and Civil war . Because of unemployment a lot of family ended up in England Including myself at the age of 16, Glad to be out of the claws of Priests. My eyes were opened in London to the hidden horror of Irish catholic society when meet so many of the abused who escaped to freedom. Because of the abuse a lot of those young Irishmen ended up in the Gay scene with its devastating consequences . Still go back to Ireland for summer holidays ,but the Church has been erased from my mind. Apparently there was an Irish woman in the East end who ran a brothel type bedsit for Irish priests who came over for some sexual adventures and leaving their dog collars at the ferry .
 


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