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Are we seeing the beginning of Internet Nostalgia?

blokesbloke

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I was inspired to start this thread by this post http://www.politics.ie/forum/feedback/250520-abuse-mod-privileges-85.html#post10510205

It struck me that the poster was effectively reminiscing about The Olden Days, but doing so in the context of the internet, which amused me.

Most Piesters are probably old enough to remember a Time Before The Internet but I suppose there might be a whole generation of people now who pretty much grew up with it, or if not will very soon be.

I was wondering when Piesters first used the internet, first got it at home, and what their early experiences of it were.

I am in my late 30s and certainly until until I was about 16 nobody had the internet at home. I dimly remember one or two geeky kids taking about getting modems for some sort of messageboard, but I don't think anyone actually did it.

My first knowledge of the internet was when a friend's dad got it, this was probably late 1996ish, and I was very jealous but it was still something most people just didn't have.

I think my first online fumblings (oo-er!) were around 1998 when I tried an internet cafe in Birmingham. I can see remember how exciting it felt to actually be online, surfing the internet (nobody really calls it "surfing" now, do they?). I went to gay.com and was chatting in live chat rooms to gay chaps in America - that was another thing, the internet was much, much American dominated in those days so I was chatting to gay men in California rather than the UK.

I think I got online properly in 1999, when I got my first proper PC with the ability to go on the internet complete with 56k modem.

Oh the memories! Dial up, so you paid a monthly charge to your ISP on top of phone call charges per-minute. Then you listened to your computer dialling up and waited a while to get your super-slow connection, which would inevitably drop at some point, could be a couple of minutes or perhaps an hour if you were lucky.

Of course it tied up the phone line. I eventually paid for a second phone line to the house and remember the excitement when AltaVista promised they would charge a flat monthly fee and then give you an 0800 number to dial up for free! I don't think they ever actually did it but it seemed to prompt others to do so.

Then the excitment of "broadband", which started out about 512k/sec I think!

What are your internet memories? Anyone young enough not to remember a pre-internet age now?

Has the internet changed your life? Has it lived up to the heady hype?

Personally I kind of miss the days when it was a New Thing and a great novelty to use it, and you seem really high-tech if you were online when the majority of people weren't.

Still, despite it now feeling just like another utility you expect to have, it has changed my leisure time. I can go days without watching TV now, whereas pre-internet I watched at least 3 hours TV a day.

I still read books as much as before, but the internet has certainly almost completely replaced the TV as my main source of entertainment, and print newspapers certainly seem less appealing that they used to, though I still buy the odd one.

It hasn't affected magazines though - I find I still buy as many magazines as I did before, despite the brave predictions that the internet would kill magazines it doesn't seem to have done - the main branch of W H Smith in Birmingham still seems to stock literally hundreds of different ones.

Ebooks don't tempt me either - I think I'll read short newspaper articles online, but not magazine articles or books - I like physical paper rather than a screen for anything but short articles.

If all newspaper content was behind a paywall I might subscribe to a paper but as it isn't, I tend to just use the sites which are still free.

Thoughts, Piesters?
 
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michael-mcivor

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It's the beginning of the end-

The Martian was first released as a E-book and it became massive then the film came-
 

Polly Ticks

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T&F Newsroom

Good OP. The memories! Funny stories later... but I came across this study recently which looks at how the Internet is changing the way we think.

"Cognitive offloading" is a great way of putting it.

Our increasing reliance on the Internet and the ease of access to the vast resource available online is affecting our thought processes for problem solving, recall and learning. In a new article published in the journal Memory, researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz and University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign have found that ‘cognitive offloading’, or the tendency to rely on things like the Internet as an aide-mémoire, increases after each use.
This research suggests that using a certain method for fact finding has a marked influence on the probability of future repeat behaviour. Time will tell if this pattern will have any further reaching impacts on human memory than has our reliance on other information sources. Certainly the Internet is more comprehensive, dependable and on the whole faster than the imperfections of human memory, borne out by the more accurate answers from participants in the internet condition during this research. With a world of information a Google search away on a smartphone, the need to remember trivial facts, figures, and numbers is inevitably becoming less necessary to function in everyday life.
 

between the bridges

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Ophs!:oops:
 

blokesbloke

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Does anyone know anyone who doesn't use the internet?

My mother doesn't and has no interest in doing so, but my dad does and she still gets him or me to order the odd thing online she wants. This means I now have an account for a ladies undies site I really didn't want to have - honest!

She won't use e-mail but some of her friends do so she gets them to e-mail him and he has to print them out for her :roll:

I don't think I know anyone else who doesn't use it. People often assume elderly people don't and I think I read a survey which suggested that a large minority still don't, but the majority still do.

I take e-mail addresses as part of my work and it's become rare for anyone not to have one now, including elderly people.
 

michael-mcivor

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A nephew was showing us pictures of his new classroom in primary school and every desk had a new lap-top on it- blackboard a thing of the past- but it's the way of the future that before you can walk now you know how to type-
 

between the bridges

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A nephew was showing us pictures of his new classroom in primary school and every desk had a new lap-top on it- blackboard a thing of the past- but it's the way of the future that before you can walk now you know how to type-
Mick, that may well be the first, last and only (almost) sensible comment you have made, well done you.
 

jmcc

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Ebooks don't tempt me either - I think I'll read short newspaper articles online, but not magazine articles or books - I like physical paper rather than a screen for anything but short articles.
Ebooks have been a significant change for me. Previously, I would have bought a print book or two a week in addition to professional books. The ease with which one can order a book from Amazon and have it within seconds has totally changed book buying for me.
 

between the bridges

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Ebooks have been a significant change for me. Previously, I would have bought a print book or two a week in addition to professional books. The ease with which one can order a book from Amazon and have it within seconds has totally changed book buying for me.
Aye, but in moi's case it was forced upon me, her indoors bought a kindle and put a ban on me getting any more books! I hated the idea at first but to be honest I wouldn't go back.
 

hollandia

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Aye, but in moi's case it was forced upon me, her indoors bought a kindle and put a ban on me getting any more books! I hated the idea at first but to be honest I wouldn't go back.
I use the kindle a lot due to travelling. The one drawback is, I used to swap physical books a lot with friends and family, which is slightly mite difficult with ebooks.
 

between the bridges

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I use the kindle a lot due to travelling. The one drawback is, I used to swap physical books a lot with friends and family, which is slightly mite difficult with ebooks.
Kindles 1 & 2 gave up the ghost, now on tablet, they don't make things to last these days.
 

jmcc

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Aye, but in moi's case it was forced upon me, her indoors bought a kindle and put a ban on me getting any more books! I hated the idea at first but to be honest I wouldn't go back.
The good thing about the Kindle is that you can get books that would never turn up in the local bookshop. The whole ebook publishing thing as enabled writers to publish their own work without having to go through the traditional publishing process. Some of the stuff is not so great but for subjects like history and alt.history, it is brilliant. It also provides US books at the same time as the US publication. It used to be a question of waiting months for the UK publication or ordering the print version direct from the US. Amazon changed that (Simon Murdoch set up the a UK competitor to Amazon which was later bought by Amazon and became Amazon.co.uk). But in the 1990s, it totally revolutionised the book business. The book suggestion thing on Amazon is also quite helpful in finding new stuff.
 

jmcc

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Kindles 1 & 2 gave up the ghost, now on tablet, they don't make things to last these days.
The hardware on the Kindles is generally quite good. It is often the micro-usb power connector on the Kindle that causes problems. Since the Kindle can't charge, the battery dies.
 

blokesbloke

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Ebooks have been a significant change for me. Previously, I would have bought a print book or two a week in addition to professional books. The ease with which one can order a book from Amazon and have it within seconds has totally changed book buying for me.
I'm kind of tempted, especially since my tiny flat is covered in the bloody things, but it just feels wrong somehow.
 

jmcc

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I'm kind of tempted, especially since my tiny flat is covered in the bloody things, but it just feels wrong somehow.
Well if you do buy a Kindle or even use the Kindle app on a computer or tablet, it is addictive. You probably will end up reading more and spending more.
 

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