Aspects of Organisational Culture that may encourage the Sexual Abuse of Children

Old Mr Grouser

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2009
Messages
6,341


*EPIC SUCCESS*

Well-known member
Joined
May 19, 2016
Messages
3,087
Australia's royal commission into institutional responses to child sexual abuse has just issued this Report,
The role of organisational culture in child sexual abuse in institutional contexts

Institutional Child Abuse is widespread, across religions, schools, the sporting world, and some sectors of commerce and industry.

This Report is likely to have a massive effect, all around the world.
I've always believed that child sexual abuse is far more prevalent than anything we may have previously thought. One needs only look at the fashion 'industry' to see what body shape (prepubescent) is desirable to the movers and shakers of haute couture for just one example of how so much of our society is corrupted.

Fashion, the UN, various religions, sporting organisations...the list goes on and encompasses pretty much most of human organisations.

When we see so called 'respectable stars' like Kate Winslett and Jodie Foster clowning around with a convicted paedo who is still on the run and has never 'paid his dues' you realise how bad the problem really is.



Pretty chummy pic above - I wonder how easy Polanski found lifting a 13 year old child to rape her.....between him and the likes of Woodie Allen.
 

cozzy121

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
5,117

ger12

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
47,680
And they delayed reporting it.

With a well known reporter also delaying reporting it.
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
217,846
Quick question, Piesters.

The document linked to in OP is 156 pages long. I'm just reading the first five pages which outline the analytical approach taken. Thats before we get to the substantive chapters.

Any of you got that far? Or are you still blathering in the wind?
 

Fritzbox

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2012
Messages
2,578
Australia's royal commission into institutional responses to child sexual abuse has just issued this Report,
The role of organisational culture in child sexual abuse in institutional contexts

Institutional Child Abuse is widespread, across religions, schools, the sporting world, and some sectors of commerce and industry.

This Report is likely to have a massive effect, all around the world.
I guess the entire history of society and the history of civilisation and human development was basically one of 'organisational culture'?
Are we to home-teach our own children and keep them under 24 hour CCTV watch for ever? Perhaps children should not be allowed to leave the house?
 

derryman

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Messages
10,621
Quick question, Piesters.

The document linked to in OP is 156 pages long. I'm just reading the first five pages which outline the analytical approach taken. Thats before we get to the substantive chapters.

Any of you got that far? Or are you still blathering in the wind?
I will come back to you about that in a few months.
 

Dimples 77

Duplicate Account
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
19,060
That sort of thing is common in many school/sports environments - the old "sure it's only a bit of fun that is intended to encourage team cohesion".

It's always been there in many countries and is often passed on from generation to generation. Especially among the meathead element in sporting circles.

The thing is that you'll always find some people in every sporting environment in which it occurs who will strongly defend it as something that is good for promoting team solidarity, or some such similar BS phrase, and that it's only wimps who can't handle the bit of fun involved.

What victims face is having to either get out of the sport, or accept it as just a cost of making it through the junior ranks of a sport if they are talented and hope to make it to a top/pro level in the sport.
 

Dimples 77

Duplicate Account
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
19,060

Old Mr Grouser

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2009
Messages
6,341

cricket

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2009
Messages
13,786
Putting the interests of the organisation before that of the child is still prevalent in many places if this and other recent reports are anything to go by. Until we get to a position of this practice being rewarded with lengthy jail sentences , children will continue to come second.
I agree that boarding schools are simply unacceptable and put kids into unnatural environments, sometimes at a very young age. It seems to be a case of rich people sub-contracting the rearing of their children.
 

Dimples 77

Duplicate Account
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
19,060
Quick question, Piesters.

The document linked to in OP is 156 pages long. I'm just reading the first five pages which outline the analytical approach taken. Thats before we get to the substantive chapters.

Any of you got that far? Or are you still blathering in the wind?

The document that I ended up with was only 111 pages.

I've read the whole thing, and what struck me most was that it summarized very well the underlying issues under a number of separate categories, using existing material. It intertwined the details of Aussie cases with similar cases in other parts of the world.

It's very well written and obviously leverages the author's knowledge to draw together and summarize a mass od information that was already out there. There's certainly an art in that.

It's not a criticism but it doesn't seem to contain any original investigative work (if that's the right term) on the part of the author. It does look like it could however become the gold standard in terms of a reference work on the subject.

As I read it so much of it seems to be obvious statements but taken individually, and in whole, they are presented very well to paint a much clearer big picture on the subject. That will be the future value of it. In the past when individual scandals broke we got information in bits and pieces, and it was hard to link cases that took place at different times and in different places.
 

Dimples 77

Duplicate Account
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
19,060
I guess the entire history of society and the history of civilisation and human development was basically one of 'organisational culture'?
Are we to home-teach our own children and keep them under 24 hour CCTV watch for ever? Perhaps children should not be allowed to leave the house?

No, we don't need to keep our children at home.

What the report says to me is that people need to be much more vigilant when it comes to the organisations that they allow their children to be part of. People can't simply say things like "well this is an organisation with a good reputation, so nothing can possibly happen to my child". And that people shouldn't accept any "alternative moral universes" that organisations try to put in place.

That will be an uphill battle though, given that there are always going to be plenty of people who are either too stupid to understand what all of this means, people who have a vested interest in protecting the organisation and people who will dismiss certain sorts of accusations as being made by wimps who can't man up and deal with the tough realities of life.

Look at the response of that idiot Eric Bristow to the latest scandal in English football:

"Ex-darts world champion Eric Bristow has apologised for suggesting football sex abuse victims are not "proper men".

Bristow had posted on Twitter that darts players were "tough guys" and footballers "wimps".

In a heated interview with host Piers Morgan on ITV's Good Morning Britain, Bristow initially defended his tweets, saying he was trying to encourage children to report abuse immediately.

He later accepted he had offended people and said: "I am sorry for that."

Bristow added: "I apologise, it was mis-worded. They are not wimps."

The 59-year-old was dropped by Sky Sports on Tuesday after asking why victims did not "sort out" their abusers "when they got older and fitter"."

Eric Bristow: Former darts champion apologises for football sex abuse comments - BBC Sport


Bristow's initial comments came straight off of the script that is used by meatheads within the macho culture of sports - that real men would have dealt with any abuse using violence once they got old enough and big enough to do something about it. As the report shows, that's not how it works with victims.
 

Old Mr Grouser

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2009
Messages
6,341
Putting the interests of the organisation before that of the child is still prevalent in many places if this and other recent reports are anything to go by.

Until we get to a position of this practice being rewarded with lengthy jail sentences , children will continue to come second.

I agree that boarding schools are simply unacceptable and put kids into unnatural environments, sometimes at a very young age. It seems to be a case of rich people sub-contracting the rearing of their children.
You're right on all points.

But one of the most significant things in this Report is its recommendation that Child Sexual Abuse in Institutional settings is best regarded as a Health & Safety issue.

The consequences of that would be massive.

If Child Abuse (Or Old People Abuse) within Institutions became seen as Health & Safety issue then it would follow that it should be covered by Health & Safety legislation. So, instead of only the perpetrator of the offence being liable for the offence, the miscreants' colleagues and managers would also be potentially liable to criminal charges - in regard to 'Criminal Negligence' and similar.

And so would the actual people further up the Chain-of-Command, such as the Directors and Trustees; and also the owner, who could be an individual, a business or some other organisation - such as a club, a charity or a Church.

In the UK, where I am, Andy Burnham, Labour's shadow health secretary is pledged to introduce a new charge of Corporate Neglect under which owners, managers and boards of private care homes could be jailed or fined for the ill-treatment of people in their care.

For many years politicians of all parties have been making similar promises, but it's never happened.

As this Australian Report points out the negligence by management and proprietors is very often in the form of cost-cutting.

So making that a criminal offence would massively increase their costs, and therefore the fees that they'd need to charge.
 

derryman

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Messages
10,621
You're right on all points.

But one of the most significant things in this Report is its recommendation that Child Sexual Abuse in Institutional settings is best regarded as a Health & Safety issue.

The consequences of that would be massive.

If Child Abuse (Or Old People Abuse) within Institutions became seen as Health & Safety issue then it would follow that it should be covered by Health & Safety legislation. So, instead of only the perpetrator of the offence being liable for the offence, the miscreants' colleagues and managers would also be potentially liable to criminal charges - in regard to 'Criminal Negligence' and similar.

And so would the actual people further up the Chain-of-Command, such as the Directors and Trustees; and also the owner, who could be an individual, a business or some other organisation - such as a club, a charity or a Church.

In the UK, where I am, Andy Burnham, Labour's shadow health secretary is pledged to introduce a new charge of Corporate Neglect under which owners, managers and boards of private care homes could be jailed or fined for the ill-treatment of people in their care.

For many years politicians of all parties have been making similar promises, but it's never happened.

As this Australian Report points out the negligence by management and proprietors is very often in the form of cost-cutting.

So making that a criminal offence would massively increase their costs, and therefore the fees that they'd need to charge.

Unfortunately h & s has become an industry within industry . As far as I can see H & S. Is more about protecting the employer than the worker.
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top