Austerity, a lost decade, and perspective

Eventualities

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So, with the recovery myth apparently now fully accepted by mainstream media, and in the rearview mirror of the official Irish historical canon, some questions.

We all know that nothing has changed for ordinary people in Ireland, post-2008. Nothing ever gets better on a day-to-day basis, work not only doesn't pay but often presents no path of progression, and the government is disinterested in mending society unless it results in national feelgood moments to carry into election campaigns, as good as they for morale. We also know that lost decades often roll into a follow-on decade of stagnation, as seen in Japan, for example.

Austerity was not a "difficult decision" taken in the absence of other options - it was a deliberate targeting of the poor, elderly, students, disabled and others dependent on public services to survive, perpetrated by successive establishment-party coalitions. This has left us with a public service that is still in the process of being dismantled for piecemeal sale, even in the face of international voter sentiment in favour of renationalisation of services. The public finally put its foot down on the matter when water was being set up to be privatised - a war still to be ended if rumours of more of the language of 'conservation' is to be believed.

Unemployment is still high after the books are uncooked: the real rate of underemployment when schemes, zero-hours deals, etc. are considered hovers at 12%, with some areas as high as 46% around the country. Meanwhile, job precarity and quality has dropped significantly in the last decade, thanks to successive coalition governments more interested in fixing holes in the wall that affect their nights' sleep than rebuilding a house crumbling around most of its occupants. Automation and other disruptive technologies are going to raze the base of blue-collar workers left in Ireland to the ground over the next two decades also, which creates a potential crisis, in combination with ageing demographics and the pension pot having been spent on bailing out the rich.

The toothlessness of establishment Ireland was also best seen in the banking inquiry, given no power to prosecute those that our politicians went out of their way (and ours) to cover for, and subject to witness' ability/inclination towards showing up at all, as seen when ECB mandarins simply didn't show up and answer to the Irish people. Of course, this isn't the only example of establishment cowardice in the austerity years - refusing to negotiate down our debt, accepting threats from Trichet and the like, inviting vulture funds to come in and level the housing market for generations to come.

The social fallout of the decision to target the young and poor is evident - rural Ireland is in a state of collapse as its institutions, like the postal service and public transport come under attack, and rural young people are given no choice but to flee their communities for work, social life and a sense of purpose rather than be trapped in stagnation. Social mobility was paused and even halted as education, housing and healthcare moved from basic rights to luxury goods, as public access was hampered and cuts continue to rot our institutions away from the inside.

So - now that we're out of the first decade of a crisis and into its second, we can begin framing it for ourselves and our children to discuss when explaining why we lack basic services and have difficulty making ends meet even with full-time jobs, for no reason other than graduating at a time when the rich didn't feel like paying their bills.

Those questions, then:

1) What do we refer to austerity and its fallout as, in a historical context? As a member of the generation worst affected by austerity, I propose we call it The Great Betrayal, reflective of official Ireland moving to protect elites at the cost of basic living standards for its young and their successors.

2) How do party supporters of Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, Labour and the Greens justify their support of their parties in hindsight, knowing what they did to us over the last decade or more?

3) In light of their continuing support for these parties, and thus endorsement of their involvement in current and future social destruction, would individuals of these parties like to explain why they think the generation under them should have a lesser standard of living than they themselves have had/are enjoying?
 


Pizza Man

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"................ We all know that nothing has changed for ordinary people in Ireland, post-2008. Nothing ever gets better on a day-to-day basis, work not only doesn't pay but often presents no path of progression, X "

X marks the spot where I stopped reading the above load of onanistic tripe.

Did anyone manage to go further? And if so, did Doofus manage to make any quasi-intelligent, valid or even mildly interesting points?
 

Eventualities

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"................ We all know that nothing has changed for ordinary people in Ireland, post-2008. Nothing ever gets better on a day-to-day basis, work not only doesn't pay but often presents no path of progression, X "

X marks the spot where I stopped reading the above load of onanistic tripe.

Did anyone manage to go further? And if so, did Doofus manage to make any quasi-intelligent, valid or even mildly interesting points?
Care to answer the points or just sh*te on them for contrarianism's sake?
 

xennial

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No
So, with the recovery myth apparently now fully accepted by mainstream media, and in the rearview mirror of the official Irish historical canon, some questions.

We all know that nothing has changed for ordinary people in Ireland, post-2008. Nothing ever gets better on a day-to-day basis, work not only doesn't pay but often presents no path of progression, and the government is disinterested in mending society unless it results in national feelgood moments to carry into election campaigns, as good as they for morale. We also know that lost decades often roll into a follow-on decade of stagnation, as seen in Japan, for example.

Austerity was not a "difficult decision" taken in the absence of other options - it was a deliberate targeting of the poor, elderly, students, disabled and others dependent on public services to survive, perpetrated by successive establishment-party coalitions. This has left us with a public service that is still in the process of being dismantled for piecemeal sale, even in the face of international voter sentiment in favour of renationalisation of services. The public finally put its foot down on the matter when water was being set up to be privatised - a war still to be ended if rumours of more of the language of 'conservation' is to be believed.

Unemployment is still high after the books are uncooked: the real rate of underemployment when schemes, zero-hours deals, etc. are considered hovers at 12%, with some areas as high as 46% around the country. Meanwhile, job precarity and quality has dropped significantly in the last decade, thanks to successive coalition governments more interested in fixing holes in the wall that affect their nights' sleep than rebuilding a house crumbling around most of its occupants. Automation and other disruptive technologies are going to raze the base of blue-collar workers left in Ireland to the ground over the next two decades also, which creates a potential crisis, in combination with ageing demographics and the pension pot having been spent on bailing out the rich.

The toothlessness of establishment Ireland was also best seen in the banking inquiry, given no power to prosecute those that our politicians went out of their way (and ours) to cover for, and subject to witness' ability/inclination towards showing up at all, as seen when ECB mandarins simply didn't show up and answer to the Irish people. Of course, this isn't the only example of establishment cowardice in the austerity years - refusing to negotiate down our debt, accepting threats from Trichet and the like, inviting vulture funds to come in and level the housing market for generations to come.

The social fallout of the decision to target the young and poor is evident - rural Ireland is in a state of collapse as its institutions, like the postal service and public transport come under attack, and rural young people are given no choice but to flee their communities for work, social life and a sense of purpose rather than be trapped in stagnation. Social mobility was paused and even halted as education, housing and healthcare moved from basic rights to luxury goods, as public access was hampered and cuts continue to rot our institutions away from the inside.

So - now that we're out of the first decade of a crisis and into its second, we can begin framing it for ourselves and our children to discuss when explaining why we lack basic services and have difficulty making ends meet even with full-time jobs, for no reason other than graduating at a time when the rich didn't feel like paying their bills.

Those questions, then:

1) What do we refer to austerity and its fallout as, in a historical context? As a member of the generation worst affected by austerity, I propose we call it The Great Betrayal, reflective of official Ireland moving to protect elites at the cost of basic living standards for its young and their successors.

2) How do party supporters of Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, Labour and the Greens justify their support of their parties in hindsight, knowing what they did to us over the last decade or more?

3) In light of their continuing support for these parties, and thus endorsement of their involvement in current and future social destruction, would individuals of these parties like to explain why they think the generation under them should have a lesser standard of living than they themselves have had/are enjoying?
1: it wouldn't be the first great betrayal.
2: politicians have pressure placed on them from ...elsewhere. Also many enjoy power,money, and corruption.
3: the only reasons a rebellion hasn't happened are: population replacement/immigration, gen-x and xennials were numerically too small to do anything, millennials are retarded and were created to be so.
 

GDPR

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The Republic of Ireland is now set to become a much harsher cold and atomized place- I think that it is very possible that Fine Gael will get an absolute majority in the next general election after which they will go full on Thatcherite.
 

Eventualities

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1: it wouldn't be the first great betrayal.
2: politicians have pressure placed on them from ...elsewhere. Also many enjoy power,money, and corruption.
3: the only reasons a rebellion hasn't happened are: population replacement/immigration, gen-x and xennials were numerically too small to do anything, millennials are retarded and were created to be so.
1: I agree, but this is certainly the first one that can be pointed to as a specific attack on a generation
2: We know politicians are corrupt: this is aimed at establishment voters and supporters
3: I disagree on millennials, most of whom are dealing with glass ceilings a mile thick after having the ladder pulled up on them
 

Pizza Man

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Care to answer the points or just sh*te on them for contrarianism's sake?
Here's a free lesson for you in basic cop-on: if you want readers to treat your "contributions" (sic) with any degree of respect, then it's advisable not to include assertions of complete and utter fatuousness in the first couple of sentences. It's important that you try to draw your readers in, rather than hitting them over the head with a half-empty bottle of stale urine.
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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economic booms, economic busts.


its all academic. The irish population replacement keeps going apace. During a bust...push it hard, get rid if irish people out of the country. During a boom, employers have staff shortages, get new blood in. All the same old crap.

2040....we are fully colonised again.
 

Eventualities

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economic booms, economic busts.


its all academic. The irish population replacement keeps going apace. During a bust...push it hard, get rid if irish people out of the country. During a boom, employers have staff shortages, get new blood in. All the same old crap.

2040....we are fully colonised again.
Ah, yes, it's all the brown peoples' fault and not right-wing Ireland eating her young. Okay.
 

Eventualities

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Here's a free lesson for you in basic cop-on: if you want readers to treat your "contributions" (sic) with any degree of respect, then it's advisable not to include assertions of complete and utter fatuousness in the first couple of sentences. It's important that you try to draw your readers in, rather than hitting them over the head with a half-empty bottle of stale urine.
I thought I showed heroic levels of restraint considering the golden shower our generation is currently enduring.
 

xennial

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No
The Republic of Ireland is now set to become a much harsher cold and atomized place- I think that it is very possible that Fine Gael will get an absolute majority in the next general election after which they will go full on Thatcherite.
we're going full UK without the plus points that culture has.
 

SamsonS

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"Unemployment is still high after the books are uncooked: the real rate of underemployment when schemes, zero-hours deals, etc. are considered hovers at 12%, with some areas as high as 46% around the country."


46%- That's wrong, and using Small Area Stats for unemployment from Census 2016, you need to compare with census 2011, and cenus 2006 to see a trend, and not with the Labour Force Survey, Monthly Unemployment Report, or Live Register stats.

if you combine unemployed and underemployed, is about 270 out of 2.3m in labour force, whoich gives the 12% rate.
In 2012 that's was over 500k, and in 2007 that was about 250k. In rate terms the unemployed plus underemployed rate was close to 25% in 2012, and 10% in 2007.
 

xennial

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No
by the way generational stuff is my little niche. when you say our generation, what specific age rage do you mean?
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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going full on Thatcherite ?

no politician in ireland would ever have the balls nor the backbone to stand up to lazy scroungers the way thatcher did. She had balls of steel.
 

Pizza Man

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I thought I showed heroic levels of restraint considering the golden shower our generation is currently enduring.
Confine yourself to addressing facts rather than colouring them with impressions and I'll happily discuss your piece. As a parent of one compulsory emigrant and one sprog (both with post-grad qualifications) neither of whom will probably ever be in a position to buy the kind of basic semi-detached house that they were brought up in, I'm reasonably well positioned to discuss your gripes

But mix the two and I'm out!
 

xennial

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Confine yourself to addressing facts rather than colouring them with impressions and I'll happily discuss your piece. As a parent of one compulsory emigrant and one sprog (both with post-grad qualifications) neither of whom will probably ever be in a position to buy the kind of basic semi-detached house that they were brought up in, I'm reasonably well positioned to discuss your gripes

But mix the two and I'm out!
I didnt think Id never be able to buy a normal house,have a job, and a couple kids. every ************************************g retard for decades could have all that just be stumbling out the pub door.

not calling you a retard btw
 

xennial

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going full on Thatcherite ?

no politician in ireland would ever have the balls nor the backbone to stand up to lazy scroungers the way thatcher did. She had balls of steel.
they cater to every whim of the lower classes, but they persecute the middle classes
 

Pizza Man

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I didnt think Id never be able to buy a normal house,have a job, and a couple kids. every ************************************g retard for decades could have all that just be stumbling out the pub door.
Does not compute! If you stumble out the pub door, then you'll never be able to keep it up for long enough to procreate!
 


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