BAF lose no dead in 2016 to enemy action - best year since 1968!

Catalpast

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The Armed Forces have marked their first year in nearly five decades without a soldier, sailor or airman being killed on operations.

Ministry of Defence figures show that 2016 was the first year without the death of a serviceman on operations since 1968.


Forces have first year since 1968 with no one killed on operations

Looks like the loss of squaddies etc in useless wars abroad is becoming increasingly unacceptable to Joe Public in the UK.

Hopefully this trend will continue and the BAF loses no more servicemen and women

- and no more die at their hands.

BTW IIRC 1968 was the first year since 1660

- that no one serving in the armed forces was killed in action!:shock:
 


ger12

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I take it they also hadn't killed any civilians in 2016?
 

Catalpast

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off with their heads

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Its lies from the Brits........ if they say squaddies have been killed in a road traffic accident in Germany that means they got greased doing some dirty black bag job
 

Polly Ticks

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Less dead is to be welcomed.. that's a given.

But war is being fought in different ways.. the figures are party due to the fact that so much fighting is done via drones. (Not much good to civilians, of course!)

What we need to be concerned about is the rise of drones and other semi-autonomous and autonomous weapons systems.

Lot countries getting behind talk of a ban on these weapons.. and some things to watch out for this year..

https://www.stopkillerrobots.org/2016/12/formal-talks/

The decision taken today [Dec 2016] by 89 nations at the Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW) to establish a Group of Governmental Experts brings the world another step closer towards a prohibition on the weapons.

The decision by states at the CCW’s Fifth Review Conference to formalize the process on killer robots that the CCW started in November 2013 demonstrates progress as it moves to the next level of deliberations. Past Groups of Governmental Experts have led to negotiations of new CCW protocols. In 1995, nations at the CCW preemptively banned lasers that would permanently blind.

The Group of Governmental Experts on lethal autonomous weapons systems will meet for one week in either April or August (depending on UN finances) and again on 13-17 November 2017. This is the bare minimum required to demonstrate credible progress in the process to discuss questions relating to these future weapons that would select and attack targets without meaningful human control.

At this week’s CCW Fifth Review Conference, China for the first time said it sees a need for a new international instrument on lethal autonomous weapons systems as it questioned the adequacy of existing international law to deal with the challenges posed. The group of nations endorsing the call to ban these weapons expanded to 19 with the additions of Argentina, Guatemala, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela.
 

cyberianpan

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Solely measuring armed forces on no casualties in their ranks is dumb

In general extolling any metric in isolation is...dumb

cyp
 

Polly Ticks

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It isn't that dangerous any more.
And yet...

https://www.stripes.com/mccaskill-drone-pilot-stress-is-unprecedented-1.354681

Military demand for drones in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere has ballooned in recent years and the Air Force has struggled to fill the needed positions, keep pilots from being overworked and make time for needed training. Research has also suggested that pilots based in the United States face the same mental stress of those deployed to war zones.

A remotely piloted aircraft pilot “could be sitting down to a meal with his or her family less than two hours after killing Islamic State or Taliban fighters on the other side of the world,” McCaskill wrote. “They could be playing with their children shortly after witnessing up close and in graphic detail the effects of a 500-pound bomb or Hellfire missile on a soft target.”
A chilling new post-traumatic stress disorder: Why drone pilots are quitting in record numbers - Salon.com

The U.S. drone war across much of the Greater Middle East and parts of Africa is in crisis and not because civilians are dying or the target list for that war or the right to wage it just about anywhere on the planet are in question in Washington. Something far more basic is at stake: drone pilots are quitting in record numbers.

There are roughly 1,000 such drone pilots, known in the trade as “18Xs,” working for the U.S. Air Force today. Another 180 pilots graduate annually from a training program that takes about a year to complete at Holloman and Randolph Air Force bases in, respectively, New Mexico and Texas. As it happens, in those same 12 months, about 240 trained pilots quit and the Air Force is at a loss to explain the phenomenon. (The better-known U.S. Central Intelligence Agency drone assassination program is also flown by Air Force pilots loaned out for the covert missions.)

On January 4, 2015, the Daily Beast revealed an undated internal memo to Air Force Chief of Staff General Mark Welsh from General Herbert “Hawk” Carlisle stating that pilot “outflow increases will damage the readiness and combat capability of the MQ-1/9 [Predator and Reaper] enterprise for years to come” and added that he was “extremely concerned.” Eleven days later, the issue got top billing at a special high-level briefing on the state of the Air Force. Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James joined Welsh to address the matter. “This is a force that is under significant stress — significant stress from what is an unrelenting pace of operations,” she told the media.

In theory, drone pilots have a cushy life. Unlike soldiers on duty in “war zones,” they can continue to live with their families here in the United States. No muddy foxholes or sandstorm-swept desert barracks under threat of enemy attack for them. Instead, these new techno-warriors commute to work like any office employees and sit in front of computer screens wielding joysticks, playing what most people would consider a glorified video game.
https://healthimpactnews.com/2013/u-s-operators-of-drones-suffering-suicide-and-antipsychotic-drugs-are-result-after-watching-people-die-repeatedly/

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/dec/29/drones-us-military

http://dronecenter.bard.edu/burdens-war-crews-drone-aircraft/

Seems that it doesn't matter how you to do it or the distances involved... killing damages the psyche... whudda thunk?!
 
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Kommunist

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Will somebody PLEASE think of the drone pilots!
 

Polly Ticks

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Will somebody PLEASE think of the drone pilots!
We have got to think of everyone... civilian, military.. all the primary victims of war. Military personnel are human too. You'll get there one day!
 


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