Balfour Declaration-100th Anniversary today: noble moment or black day for democracy?

JacquesHughes

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Today the Israeli and British Governments 'celebrate' the 100th anniversary of the 'Balfour Declaration'- Benjamin Netanyahu is visiting Mrs May at number 10, and holding a dinner somewhere. The Declaration...



.. is a letter dated 2 November 1917, from Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour ( who would be otherwise little known to history) to Baron Walter Rothschild ( c/o his London home), the contents of which the Baron was asked to bring to the attention of the rest of the Zionist Federation of Britain and Ireland.

The famous wording is brief, though the controversy over it's fairness has been long.

Comment: This is a puzzling document. Only 2 days earlier British and Empire forces had taken their first significant prize in Palestine from Turkish forces. Liberation of the inhabitants, however, was the last thing on their mind; the territory was immediately ( if somewhat vaguely in it's extent) promised to another party altogether.
Battle of Beersheba charge recreated for centenary - BBC News

Such generosity with the hard-won spoils is all the more remarkable , when one considers the UK, becoming aware of the huge and initially unforeseen human cost of the war, was entering some decades of national grief over their own losses.

There is some continuity after 100 years : a preference on the Zionist side to lobby the elites of powerful countries, and the continuing absence of protection for the 'rights of the non-Jewish communities in Palestine'.


PS I lack the skills to post an image of the typewritten letter received by Baron Rothschild
 


Dame_Enda

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The idea of a Jewish homeland was okay. The problem was - as stated a few days ago by Boris Johnson - that the parts of the Declaration on safeguarding the rights of the non-Jewish population have not been realised.

A lot of trouble has been caused by the ambiguity on whether or not "homeland" meant "state". Balfour said that he wanted the Jewish homeland to be a "little Ulster". Chaim Weizman lobbied the Brits by calling Palestine "the jugular vein of the British empire", emphasising its proximity to the Suez Canal.
 

former wesleyan

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Times of Israel website hacked by Turkish group - Israel National News

JTA - The Times of Israel’s website was hacked by a Turkish group on the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration.

On Thursday morning, the site’s homepage featured an image of children waving a Turkish flag and a line that apparently vowed to protect “Palestine” and Gaza.

Underneath that was a Quran verse that read “And We shaded you with clouds and sent down to you manna and quails, [saying], “Eat from the good things with which We have provided you.” And they wronged Us not – but they were [only] wronging themselves.”
 

GabhaDubh

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First offer was that the settlement should be in Uganda. Primarily for Russian Jews which numbered approximately 5 million at the time.
 

blinding

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Perfidious Albion in action.........

Why was America the first State to recognise the State of Israel ?

Were they looking for a footing / influence in that part of the world ?
 

Dame_Enda

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Perfidious Albion in action.........

Why was America the first State to recognise the State of Israel ?

Were they looking for a footing / influence in that part of the world ?
Secretary of State George Marshall strongly opposed the decision. He argued the US might need Arab oil in a WW3. Theres no doubt the 1948 election also played a role as Dewey was expected to win and Truman only narrowly won the popular vote.
 

blinding

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Secretary of State George Marshall strongly opposed the decision. He argued the US might need Arab oil in a WW3. Theres no doubt the 1948 election also played a role as Dewey was expected to win and Truman only narrowly won the popular vote.
Interesting . I thought it was America making sure that they had a base to exert their influence from .
 

Trampas

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First offer was that the settlement should be in Uganda. Primarily for Russian Jews which numbered approximately 5 million at the time.
There were other daft suggestions also none of which would have been acceptable to Zionist lobby which by 1917 had already been on the go for more than 30 years.
 

Trampas

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Perfidious Albion in action.........

Why was America the first State to recognise the State of Israel ?

Were they looking for a footing / influence in that part of the world ?
In fact Russia was just as quick off the mark. Not sure which won.
 

LookWhoItIs

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Today the Israeli and British Governments 'celebrate' the 100th anniversary of the 'Balfour Declaration'- Benjamin Netanyahu is visiting Mrs May at number 10, and holding a dinner somewhere. The Declaration...



.. is a letter dated 2 November 1917, from Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour ( who would be otherwise little known to history) to Baron Walter Rothschild ( c/o his London home), the contents of which the Baron was asked to bring to the attention of the rest of the Zionist Federation of Britain and Ireland.

The famous wording is brief, though the controversy over it's fairness has been long.

Comment: This is a puzzling document. Only 2 days earlier British and Empire forces had taken their first significant prize in Palestine from Turkish forces. Liberation of the inhabitants, however, was the last thing on their mind; the territory was immediately ( if somewhat vaguely in it's extent) promised to another party altogether.
Battle of Beersheba charge recreated for centenary - BBC News

Such generosity with the hard-won spoils is all the more remarkable , when one considers the UK, becoming aware of the huge and initially unforeseen human cost of the war, was entering some decades of national grief over their own losses.

There is some continuity after 100 years : a preference on the Zionist side to lobby the elites of powerful countries, and the continuing absence of protection for the 'rights of the non-Jewish communities in Palestine'.


PS I lack the skills to post an image of the typewritten letter received by Baron Rothschild
Still paying the price for that one - another Brit conspiracy where those left behind suffered the consequences - but in recent years that particular chicken along with others from their meddling days is coming home to roost
 

GabhaDubh

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Chaim Weizman was an interesting man, a scientist from Manchester who supplied the British army with 90,000 gallons of Acetone which was essential for artillary for the First World War. A powerful man and friend of Prime Ministers.
 

Trampas

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Chaim Weizman was an interesting man, a scientist from Manchester who supplied the British army with 90,000 gallons of Acetone which was essential for artillary for the First World War. A powerful man and friend of Prime Ministers.
Yes. Weizmann was personable and could be allowed out. He was a genuine "good cop" in contrast to Ben Gurion's rough and gruff approach to foreign relations. He was sidelined by Ben Gurion who signed Israel into existence while sitting alone, apart from a photograph of Theodor Herzl on the wall behind him.
 

blinding

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Didn’t the Israelies use terrorism against the British to negotiate their desired outcome .

Was that good terrorism or bad terrorism ?
 

Trampas

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Didn’t the Israelies use terrorism against the British to negotiate their desired outcome .

Was that good terrorism or bad terrorism ?
Certainly the British thought it was bad. They couldn't wait to get out of the place. Towards the end of the mandate the Brits stayed in barracks and allowed the two belligerents to get on with it.
 

Glenshane4

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During the First World War, some in Britain feared that American Jews would use their influence to bring the United States into the war on the side of Germany. [The British suspected that the Americans had designs on their (British) empire.]

American Jews had a high opinion of Germans because, over many generations, many Jewish refugees from pogroms in Eastern Europe had been granted refuge in Germany. The Balfour declaration was a means by which Britain, in its hour of need, strengthened its support base in the USA.

How justified was the British fear about pro-German sympathies in the USA? I do not know.
 

GabhaDubh

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Secretary of State George Marshall strongly opposed the decision. He argued the US might need Arab oil in a WW3. Theres no doubt the 1948 election also played a role as Dewey was expected to win and Truman only narrowly won the popular vote.
The Balfour doctrine was old news by then in American government. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis an intellectual giant had already convinced President Woodrow Wilson in 1917. I believe he was the first Jewish member of the U.S Supreme Court.
 

eoghanacht

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Didn’t the Israelies use terrorism against the British to negotiate their desired outcome .

Was that good terrorism or bad terrorism ?
Yes they bombed a hotel in Jerusalem, but we're not supposed to talk about that.
 


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