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Ballymurphy Massacre Forgotten victims.


Tiernanator

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Jun 2, 2007
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345
Relatives of those slaughtered by the British Parachute regiment in Ballymurphy are seeking to have an enquiry and official recognition that their loved ones were innocent victims of the British Army. 11 people were murdered including women and a priest.

The true scale and nature of the atrocity was hidden because of the introduction of internment however the families of those killed have never given up hope that recognition and recourse should be afforded to them. This event that took place over three days in August 1971 was a tragedy and a total disgrace. It was also sadly a trial run for the massacre of Bloody Sunday in Derry that happened the following January.
 

Catalpa

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Jun 10, 2004
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10,301
Tiernanator said:
Relatives of those slaughtered by the British Parachute regiment in Ballymurphy are seeking to have an enquiry and official recognition that their loved ones were innocent victims of the British Army. 11 people were murdered including women and a priest.

The true scale and nature of the atrocity was hidden because of the introduction of internment however the families of those killed have never given up hope that recognition and recourse should be afforded to them. This event that took place over three days in August 1971 was a tragedy and a total disgrace. It was also sadly a trial run for the massacre of Bloody Sunday in Derry that happened the following January.
Details or Link please?
 

Sidewinder

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Oct 23, 2004
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442
Catalpa said:
Details or Link please?
You've never heard of it? :shock:

Basically the exact same troops who were in Derry on Bloody Sunday went on a killing spree in Ballymurphy. They set up sniper positions on rooftops in the Loyalist Springmartin Estate and spent a couple of days killing random civilians, including women and a priest who went out to administer Last Rites to one of those shot.

They came back to the same area in July of 72, after Bloody Sunday, and shot dead another 5 civilians at random, an event sometimes referred to as the Springhill Massacre.
 

Catalpa

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10,301
Sidewinder said:
Catalpa said:
Details or Link please?
You've never heard of it? :shock:

Basically the exact same troops who were in Derry on Bloody Sunday went on a killing spree in Ballymurphy. They set up sniper positions on rooftops in the Loyalist Springmartin Estate and spent a couple of days killing random civilians, including women and a priest who went out to administer Last Rites to one of those shot.

They came back to the same area in July of 72, after Bloody Sunday, and shot dead another 5 civilians at random, an event sometimes referred to as the Springhill Massacre.
Oh I certainly have but claims made online need to be backed up.

Trouble with the Paras is they were just not cut out for this kind of thing - great bunch of soldiers to have on your side when going into battle and need serious marking if playing for the opposition.

But a disaster in an urban enviroment where one wrong move can trigger a riot and shooting.

All they did was just make a bad situation worse.

IIRC the Irish Government tried to have them removed from the North alltogether back in the 1980's?

Read Asher's Shoot to kill for a no holes barred account of serving there with them.
 

Sidewinder

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Oct 23, 2004
Messages
442
Catalpa said:
Trouble with the Paras is they were just not cut out for this kind of thing - great bunch of soldiers to have on your side when going into battle and need serious marking if playing for the opposition.

But a disaster in an urban enviroment where one wrong move can trigger a riot and shooting.

All they did was just make a bad situation worse.
:shock: :shock: :shock:

I'm surprised at you. That's a load of snivelling, grovelling, servile, spineless bollocks.

They deliberately, with planning and malice aforethought, went out to murder Irish civilians at random. There was no "mistake", no "thought they were under fire", no "riot", no "badly trained for the situation", or any of the rest of the bolloxology that grovelling gimps like to trot out to excuse the deliberate cold-blooded slaughter of their fellow citizens.

It was deliberate policy, which they carried out on at least 3 occasions over the course of a year, resulting in the deaths of at least 30 completely innocent Irish people.

Open yer fecking eyes and grow a pair, man.
 

Joeyjoejoe

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Jun 22, 2006
Messages
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So Theresa Villiers was on Morning Ireland today and wasn't asked about her decision not to have an inquiry into the Ballymurphy Massacre.

Govts in close contact after Adams arrest - RTÉ News

The journalists and politicians expressing outrage over Jean McConville's murder are happy to ignore other murders.

Which means they're not really that bothered about murder at all.
 

Mickeymac

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Jun 30, 2010
Messages
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So Theresa Villiers was on Morning Ireland today and wasn't asked about her decision not to have an inquiry into the Ballymurphy Massacre.

Govts in close contact after Adams arrest - RTÉ News

The journalists and politicians expressing outrage over Jean McConville's murder are happy to ignore other murders.

Which means they're not really that bothered about murder at all.



Disgusting, shame on those West Brits.
 

Martin Doyle VC MM.

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Jan 21, 2013
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It´s probably just the case that it´d be again a lot of work to do and much money to spend on having every case from that time reviewed and brought to court. I suppose that this has been the real reason behind the decision by the British government. They might fear that it could cost them as much as Bloody Sunday.
Possibly,but should money be the defining factor when a state is trying to uncover the truth in the murder of its citizens, this decision will always leave them open to the accusations of a "cover up" and give the impression that there is something to hide.
 

DT123

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Possibly,but should money be the defining factor when a state is trying to uncover the truth in the murder of its citizens, this decision will always leave them open to the accusations of a "cover up" and give the impression that there is something to hide.
Money is a finite resource and if it comes to the bit,there are better things to spend it on than a never ending series of enquiries.Bloody Sunday, provided the death knell for any subsequent cases.
 

Mickeymac

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Money is a finite resource and if it comes to the bit,there are better things to spend it on than a never ending series of enquiries.Bloody Sunday, provided the death knell for any subsequent cases.


Think of the money the Brit taxpayer would have saved if they were to have done the decent thing in Ireland and left.
 

Global Justice

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Aug 4, 2011
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Money is a finite resource and if it comes to the bit,there are better things to spend it on than a never ending series of enquiries.Bloody Sunday, provided the death knell for any subsequent cases.
It's totally naive and a red herring to blame money. It's because of the exposure of facts and terror committed by the state on innocent civilians that is the reason why the British don't want further inquires into their lust for state terror and collusion.

The cost of Bloody Sunday was due to the denials, propaganda and victimisation of innocent civilians and the amount of corrupt lawyers and judges that the British State employed in order to cover-up and lie through their back teeth about the massacre that occurred on that day
 

Mickeymac

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It's totally naive and a red herring to blame money. It's because of the exposure of facts and terror committed by the state on innocent civilians that is the reason why the British don't want further inquires into their lust for state terror and collusion.

The cost of Bloody Sunday was due to the denials, propaganda and victimisation of innocent civilians and the amount of corrupt lawyers and judges that the British State employed in order to cover-up and lie through their back teeth about the massacre that occurred on that day


Very good assessment of the whole damn affair, pity the onionists did not accept that because the occupied sick counties would be in a much better place today.
 

DT123

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Think of the money the Brit taxpayer would have saved if they were to have done the decent thing in Ireland and left.
The fact that the British have been in "Ireland" for centuries longer, than the likes of you have been in America, is lost on you I presume?
 

Mickeymac

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The fact that the British have been in "Ireland" for centuries longer, than the likes of you have been in America, is lost on you I presume?


The fact that the Irish never wanted them there seems to be lost on you.

Disgusting occupation that caused misery to millions, disgraceful IMO.
 

Swords Hoopster

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Mar 18, 2012
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Mick, did you know Ivor Bell is a Prod?

What the fu*k happened there?
 
T

Thomas_

Possibly,but should money be the defining factor when a state is trying to uncover the truth in the murder of its citizens, this decision will always leave them open to the accusations of a "cover up" and give the impression that there is something to hide.
It´s in terms of money also the question what an inquiry aims at. Is it to produce evidence for prosecution or is it just to reveal the truth without any legal actions against the perpetrators (given that they´re still alive when a court case can be opened). The proceedings on the Bloody Sunday inquiry took many years just to prove that those killed on that day were innocent which was rather clear right from the very day it happened.

It is as well a question of compensation from the British state towards the victims families and of course a matter of (dis-) honour towards the Paras in particular and the British Army in general. On the other hand, those former PIRA Volunteers are still refusing to give evidence in court for what they did. To find out the whole truth, all parties involved in the Troubles would have to speak the truth and restrain from any cover ups.

All in all it´s a very difficult matter but I think that the British state has some obligation to bring justice to the victims families if this is possible. Another question which never has been raised by any Irish Republican is, whether those families of British soldiers killed while on duty in NI by the PIRA have a right for justice too? I´d say that they also have that right, as does everybody. I´m not a supporter of the opinion like others who say that "they went to NI to serve there and it´s their own fault to get killed as a British soldier". Nobody is asking their families about their griev and their demand to have the murderers brought to court.

Just some thoughts. Justice shouldn´t be a oneway ave.
 

theloner

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Mick, did you know Ivor Bell is a Prod?

What the fu*k happened there?
Yearning for equality and national liberation has nothing to do which religion one is.
 
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