Battery Cages - LIVE.

RootofStar

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slippy wicket

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I would imagine that they would have more important things to worry about in israel than the living conditions of birds. Maybe the living conditions of people?

In fairness though, i would not eat anything out of that, but then i am lucky in that i can provide my own meat.
 

truthforsooth

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I would imagine that they would have more important things to worry about in israel than the living conditions of birds. Maybe the living conditions of people?
Surely we can work on more than one thing at a time? Compassion has a wide reach.
 

Asparagus

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I would imagine that they would have more important things to worry about in israel than the living conditions of birds. Maybe the living conditions of people?

In fairness though, i would not eat anything out of that, but then i am lucky in that i can provide my own meat.
did you have to have any ribs removed for that?
 

junius

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The birds obviously havn't been there very long or they are not as bad as a few years ago when there used to be six hens in each battery cage. Normally battery caged layers have no feathers at all left on them. It's not a good life but its not only in Israel. Plenty of these in Ireland too and probably more than three in a cage although I'm not sure if the cage size is identical - not far off though. Strangely, at the end of their laying life, which is less than one year, those which escape from being turned into chicken stock actually make good pets and soon become relatively normal hens if kept in better conditions.
 

Super8

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Strangely, at the end of their laying life, which is less than one year, those which escape from being turned into chicken stock actually make good pets and soon become relatively normal hens if kept in better conditions.
That's an awful lot of middle class back gardens.
 

Edo

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I'd say those chickens are still doing better than any Palestinians in cages in Israel
 

slippy wicket

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junius

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That's an awful lot of middle class back gardens.
Yes, and they usually get taken by urban foxes before too long! They're not afraid of daylight hours and don't restrict their hunting to night time. Bit worried about Slippy Wicket in Wexford who hunts a lot of his meat??
 

Cincinnatus

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yep the real issue is not the fate of the poor auld Madra Ruas but the great cow, pig & chicken holocausts. Eat less meat, but when you do, get it from a local trusted source (like slippy!!)
 

Simon.D

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An animal rights view on this, btw, would not think that "free range" birds get a much better deal - they certainly end up in the same slaughterhouses.


Ros
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You really don't think there's that much of a difference? Ye really haven't a clue, nor one ounce of empathy for the non-humans of this world... Your animal rights mumbo jumbo is as irrational as a religion.. If only chickens could talk and put you and yer like in your place...
 

Vote_No_on_Everything

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I worked in a rural area of south China about 15 years ago, the people there did eat meat but they had a belief among themselves that if an animal (or bird I persume) was held in captivity then it got depressed and its meat was toxic and those who ate this meat would get sick or disese from it years later in life. I think they were refering to cancer?
They were a skinny healthy lot, then again they all went around on old rusty bicycles.
 

RootofStar

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You really don't think there's that much of a difference? Ye really haven't a clue, nor one ounce of empathy for the non-humans of this world... Your animal rights mumbo jumbo is as irrational as a religion.. If only chickens could talk and put you and yer like in your place...

Have you read much of this "animal rights mumbo jumbo?" For example, it is true that they end up in slaughterhouses, no?

Also, think about the issue of "free-range." The definition of free range is changing, and now it can mean one very big cage like a broiler unit. However, the real issue is this: the more popular "free-range" becomes, the more and more intensive the systems of confinement will become. There is a structural problem here.


Ros
 

L'Chaim

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This is something I have a huge problem with. I eat the white of four eggs every morning. I work out and egg white is the best source of protein. However trying to find eggs that are not from caged hens is very difficult. Some brands say the eggs are from caged animals while with others the information is very vague. I thought organic eggs were the best way to go, but I find that organic just means the hens are fed organic feed. Don't know if the hens are caged or not. The best information I can get from free range is that the eggs come from different types of hens. At the moment I get eggs and the information on the box says "laid by hens that have the freedom to roam in a natural environment". I'm hoping that means not from caged hens, but I'm not really sure. All very confusing
 

Luigi Vampa

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This is a live stream from a hidden camera placed in a farm in Israel.


Reality TV Reaches the Chicken Coop - ???????? ??????? ???? ????


According to Compassion In World Farming Ireland - Compassion In World Farming Ireland - Irish Farming Facts - these are the living conditions of 68% of chickens held captive in Ireland.

An animal rights view on this, btw, would not think that "free range" birds get a much better deal - they certainly end up in the same slaughterhouses.


Ros
Any money says they are Palestinian chickens and not Jewish ones
 

Simon.D

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The definition of free range is changing, and now it can mean one very big cage like a broiler unit. However, the real issue is this: the more popular "free-range" becomes, the more and more intensive the systems of confinement will become. There is a structural problem here.
I think the opposite is true and that the more popular free range becomes, the more producers will feel the pressure to up their game.. Though we do need to be somewhat vigilant about it as consumers such that the definitions aren't squeezed...

However, I'm assuming you're even against the levels of free range enjoyed by many clutches of laying hens taken on as part of small holdings, where they're often set completely free by day and only to be locked at night..
 

deiseguy

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VS


You really don't think there's that much of a difference? Ye really haven't a clue, nor one ounce of empathy for the non-humans of this world... Your animal rights mumbo jumbo is as irrational as a religion.. If only chickens could talk and put you and yer like in your place...
You absolute dope your first picture is much further from "free range" than your second one in fact I could be wrong but I think your second picture would actually comply with the current definition of free range. As far as I can see a good number of the birds in the second picture are not constricted by cages and that my dear dope is "free range".

TBH the consumer has it coming. In the early 1950's an egg was the same price as the indo, now how many eggs could you get for the price of the indo? Those battery hens are where they are because of consumers demands there is no other way to dress it up. The consumer wants cheap food and despite any pontifications they may give to market researchers they couldn't give a half a phuck what suffering whether it be human or animal is involved in delivering their low, low prices.
 

junius

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I worked in a rural area of south China about 15 years ago, the people there did eat meat but they had a belief among themselves that if an animal (or bird I persume) was held in captivity then it got depressed and its meat was toxic and those who ate this meat would get sick or disese from it years later in life. I think they were refering to cancer?
They were a skinny healthy lot, then again they all went around on old rusty bicycles.
These birds kept in battery cages are not for eating except as a by-product such as stock cubes at the end of their commercial egg laying life (about one year). Birds sold as chickens for eating in your typical supermarket are usually nore more than four or five weeks of age, pumped up with fast growth pellets to reach full size in that length of time. By six weeks the house is emptied to be prepared for the next batch and those birds which have not performed satisfactorily enough to be killed are destroyed. The 'system' is disgusting but what else do we expect in modern day Europe...???
 

truthisfree

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I would have no problem eating the birds in those cages tbh, I was brought up on real free range eggs and chickens, this video does not bother me at all.
 


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