Bedsits are back in Dublin Hipster style

silverharp

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probably not the worst concept except that it highlights the shortage of space in major cities and and not sure why adults in their mid to late 20's would want to live life college freshers,sounds hideous.

not cheap at 1300 euros but location is good and no dreary commutes if you work in town

https://www.independent.ie/life/home-garden/homes/meet-the-21stcentury-bean-an-t-looking-after-50-house-mates-36608483.html


The uniquely Irish role of the Bean an Tí is to be revived for the hipster era at the new concept shared living building underway by Node at Dublin's FitzWilliam Square and set to open next month.
The US and London based group has just hired its first Irish Bean an Tí (or community curator as she will be known), who will be charged with taking care of the needs of more than 50 young adults on a daily basis.
The first lady of the Dublin house is 22-year-old Ava Kilmartin from Goatstown who says she will take her inspiration for the job partly from her most recent four-year role as events and marketing manager for the trendy city bar, nightclub and eaterie, House on Dublin's Leeson St. "The rest I'll be taking from my time in the Gaeltacht in my teenage years - weeks spent under the eye of a far more traditional type of Bean an Tí, who missed absolutely nothing!

"I'll have an office in the building but mostly I'll be hanging out in the common areas like the lounge, interacting and making myself available for anyone who needs help. Node is designed so people can come from another city, often from another country, and just plug into our city-based community straight away. It will be my job to help familiarise them with Dublin and the other people in the house."

Derived from the US-born model of shared living for adults and modeled on the managed and shared student buildings typical on US college compuses, Node's first Irish building will be run and furnished like those it already opened in New York, London and Toronto. The chain targets as residents young career progressive, tech savvy and more footloose adults who are fed up with the overpriced rental accommodation which all too often falls short of expectations.

The restored period Georgian house in Dublin will offer private one and two-bed self contained apartments blended with common shared areas like lounges, kitchens and garden spaces in which residents will mix together as a community. Rents in the order of €1,350 per person per month will include all bills and stylish furnishings akin to high-end New York Loft apartments. For that everyone gets their own bedrooms and bathroom and "proper" 600 sq ft to 700 sq ft apartment spaces.
 


Spirit Of Newgrange

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so policymakers banned the bedsit. Oh lets crucify those nasty bad landlords. Then everybody abandoned the landlording business. Then every property that formerly housed 40 people with a degree of privacy and dignity was converted back into a Family Home. A family home with 4 occupants.

Then the housing crisis hit. And now this ?

Irish policymaking is always reactionary and driven by dodgy ideology. With little heed to the evidence from history and geography.


Want to invest in a business ? Which of the below is a toxic business choice ?
- a farm
- a sweetshop
- a factory
-a buy-to-let property
- a restaurant
- a football club.

the over-taxing and over-regulation of the property business is the reason our cities are now awash with people living in tents. That plus the immigration that nobody is allowed to talk about on RTE.

Tenants have now so many rights, and landlords so few that the whole business model is shot. And worst of all are the long-term dole heads. A nightmare all round.
 
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EUrJokingMeRight

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When you check out the scumbags on airbnb trying to charge 10k for similar fare you realise the kind of scum involved in property rental in Ireland.

€1,350 is not cheap for many but imho not too unreasonable either.
 

GJG

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so policymakers banned the bedsit. Oh lets crucify those nasty bad landlords. Then everybody abandoned the landlording business. Then every property that formerly housed 40 people with a degree of privacy and dignity was converted back into a Family Home. A family home with 4 occupants.

Then the housing crisis hit. And now this ?

Irish policymaking is always reactionary and driven by dodgy ideology. With little heed to the evidence from history and geography.


Want to invest in a business ? Which of the below is a toxic business choice ?
- a farm
- a sweetshop
- a factory
-a buy-to-let property
- a restaurant
- a football club.

The price of residential property is driven by how much money there is in the market to buy it. There are basically no other factors.

If you reduce the minimum standards, then suppliers will reduce their standards, but there won't be any less money in the market, so buyers basically pay the same for less.

The variable that soaks up the excess value is the price of building land. If you increase prices for any given product, that is just reflected in higher building land prices, and the same is true if you reduce them, at least until the price of building land approaches zero.

We are in a market where all the other inputs into producing housing are available and fungible. The only input that can't be put on the back of a lorry, or a Ryanair flight, is building land. Plenty of other locations have vastly better housing (and far better standards) at a much lower price. Those regulations have no impact on the price paid, because housing is a totally inelastic market. You can't choose to do without, and you can't import or export it. The only thing that regulations change is what buyers get for their money.

The only way to improve the housing crisis is to balance the power between the buyer and the seller. In any other market, the seller could hoard their product, but they would risk it being devalued by rust, fashion, going stale, or technological advance. This balances power between the buyer and the seller.

Land, by contrast, tends to increase in value the longer it is hoarded. In addition, unlike any other product, price increases cannot encourage new suppliers into the market.

The solution is to end our bizarre privileging of wealth, and tax property (land) more and work and enterprise less in a revenue-neutral way. That would divert investment, energy and talent from nonproductive to productive areas of the economy.
 

Niall996

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When you check out the scumbags on airbnb trying to charge 10k for similar fare you realise the kind of scum involved in property rental in Ireland.

€1,350 is not cheap for many but imho not too unreasonable either.
You don't think that's expensive? You can get a nice one bedroom apartment for that in a nice area.
 

Niall996

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The solution is to end our bizarre privileging of wealth, and tax property (land) more and work and enterprise less in a revenue-neutral way. That would divert investment, energy and talent from nonproductive to productive areas of the economy.
Bonkers. Absolutely bonkers. It was the higher taxation on rental income that drove property providers out of the market and completely destroyed the supply of rental property. The rental crisis today isn the legacy of that completely misguided policy. That's why it's so hard to find a place to rent. And so expensive. Reduce the tax, encourage new suppliers to enter the market or older ones to return and increased supply not only provides availability but will drive down prices. Rarity is the reason for high prices in most cases. Especially rental property.
 

NYCKY

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You don't think that's expensive? You can get a nice one bedroom apartment for that in a nice area.
Including "all bills", it doesn't sound too bad, they can add up. Then you likely have little commuting (or time spent) expense which is another bonus.
 

GJG

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Bonkers. Absolutely bonkers. It was the higher taxation on rental income that drove property providers out of the market and completely destroyed the supply of rental property.
I'm not suggesting higher taxation on rental income. There is no reason to tax it at a different rate than the rest of the economy; that cost would ultimately fall on renters.

The rental crisis today isn the legacy of that completely misguided policy. That's why it's so hard to find a place to rent. And so expensive. Reduce the tax, encourage new suppliers to enter the market or older ones to return and increased supply not only provides availability but will drive down prices. Rarity is the reason for high prices in most cases. Especially rental property.
Reduce what tax exactly?

And exactly how would that draw 'new suppliers' into the market? The commodity that is in short supply is land (all other requirements - building supplies and labour can be and are easily imported). The main supplier in the land market hasn't been active for about 6,000 years at least.

Short of performing miracles, the trick is to get current holders of land to bring their supply into use. Selling land you own for housing is already vastly profitable. The problem is that it can never be as profitable as waiting until later to build, because land never gets consumed, and no new land is every produced. It is simply impossible to make it more profitable to build now than later.

What is possible is to make hoarding land unprofitable. If you tax un- or under-used land at a rate approaching the rate its price appreciates, that would re-balance the market in favour of the buyer, and create a functioning housing system.
 

theObserver@hotmail.com

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probably not the worst concept except that it highlights the shortage of space in major cities and and not sure why adults in their mid to late 20's would want to live life college freshers,sounds hideous.

not cheap at 1300 euros but location is good and no dreary commutes if you work in town

https://www.independent.ie/life/home-garden/homes/meet-the-21stcentury-bean-an-t-looking-after-50-house-mates-36608483.html
Adults in their mid to late 20's? More like adults in their mid to late 30's. Their choices are either a depressing dungeon of a bedsit or a house share with strangers. A lot choose the dungeon because they want their own space (what little there is in a bedsit) and are sick of houseshares.
 

Ardillaun

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She’s pretty, not how I pictured a bean an tí.
Wow, one heck of a landlady! I like the way Keenan describes her ‘most recent four year role’ as if she’s been in the business for decades. And she’s not a property manager, she’s a curator of living space. Begob, things have changed since my day.
 
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Ardillaun

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Some less gregarious types might prefer micro-apartments in high rise towers to bedsits. Why shouldn’t people have the choice?
 

sic transit

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It's an idea that suits a certain type of tenant and a good one. Ultimately it'll be down to planning authorities i.e. councils to sort out a more comprehensive mix that works.
 

sic transit

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I'm not suggesting higher taxation on rental income. There is no reason to tax it at a different rate than the rest of the economy; that cost would ultimately fall on renters.



Reduce what tax exactly?

And exactly how would that draw 'new suppliers' into the market? The commodity that is in short supply is land (all other requirements - building supplies and labour can be and are easily imported). The main supplier in the land market hasn't been active for about 6,000 years at least.

Short of performing miracles, the trick is to get current holders of land to bring their supply into use. Selling land you own for housing is already vastly profitable. The problem is that it can never be as profitable as waiting until later to build, because land never gets consumed, and no new land is every produced. It is simply impossible to make it more profitable to build now than later.

What is possible is to make hoarding land unprofitable. If you tax un- or under-used land at a rate approaching the rate its price appreciates, that would re-balance the market in favour of the buyer, and create a functioning housing system.
Apparently the tax will be in place from next year.

https://www.kildarestreet.com/wrans/?id=2017-11-09a.739
 

Ardillaun

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There’s nothing wrong with this option at all. If only all accommodation was of a remotely similar standard.

The Dublin rental market is failing in its function. Everything should be looked at to encourage more properties for the market.
 

Burnout

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I have a life.
February 17 2018 5:09 PM:

Rents nationwide continue to surge, hit another record high. As rent prices continue to rise, renters across the country are scrambling for a place to call their own. According to a report by Daft.ie, the average monthly rent nationwide during the final quarter of 2017 was €1,227.

This is the seventh quarter in a row that a new all-time high has been set. As a result of the continuously soaring rent prices. Dublin rents jumped by almost 11pc last year, with the average monthly rent now costing €1,822.

http://******/2F9WJs2
 

Gin Soaked

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February 17 2018 5:09 PM:

Rents nationwide continue to surge, hit another record high. As rent prices continue to rise, renters across the country are scrambling for a place to call their own. According to a report by Daft.ie, the average monthly rent nationwide during the final quarter of 2017 was €1,227.

This is the seventh quarter in a row that a new all-time high has been set. As a result of the continuously soaring rent prices. Dublin rents jumped by almost 11pc last year, with the average monthly rent now costing €1,822.

http://******/2F9WJs2
1800 is horrendous. Presumably that is for houses, not apartments.

There is a load of private housing coming on stream at present and later in 2018 and 2019. This should clear down the backlog and as people move into these newer, better and more expensive homes, this should free up demand a bit.

Terrible to be having to delay your family and life generally while you wait for a market to hopefully swing...
 

Niall996

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I'm not suggesting higher taxation on rental income. There is no reason to tax it at a different rate than the rest of the economy; that cost would ultimately fall on renters.



Reduce what tax exactly?

And exactly how would that draw 'new suppliers' into the market? The commodity that is in short supply is land (all other requirements - building supplies and labour can be and are easily imported). The main supplier in the land market hasn't been active for about 6,000 years at least.

Short of performing miracles, the trick is to get current holders of land to bring their supply into use. Selling land you own for housing is already vastly profitable. The problem is that it can never be as profitable as waiting until later to build, because land never gets consumed, and no new land is every produced. It is simply impossible to make it more profitable to build now than later.

What is possible is to make hoarding land unprofitable. If you tax un- or under-used land at a rate approaching the rate its price appreciates, that would re-balance the market in favour of the buyer, and create a functioning housing system.
Land isn't an issue. It exists. It has a price. To convert that land into rental units can only happen two ways. Either the government use taxpayers money (a huge proportion of which comes from existing homeowners) to subsidise other people by building them houses at below market rates.
The other, through market rates, means that people need to at the very least break even. In order for units to be made available to rent, someone has to buy that unit, kit it out an put it on the rental market. They can only do that if it makes economic sense. The revised tax levels imposed on rental income killed the market, killed the supply and has now created a crisis that isn't going to go away. So, very high rents, extremely limited supply and new micro units and shared units is the way of the future. We have reaped what was sown. Pure cause and effect.
 

APettigrew92

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Bonkers. Absolutely bonkers. It was the higher taxation on rental income that drove property providers out of the market and completely destroyed the supply of rental property. The rental crisis today isn the legacy of that completely misguided policy. That's why it's so hard to find a place to rent. And so expensive. Reduce the tax, encourage new suppliers to enter the market or older ones to return and increased supply not only provides availability but will drive down prices. Rarity is the reason for high prices in most cases. Especially rental property.
Ah. We should just drop taxes on landlords altogether then. Not taxing wealth is clearly the best way to create wealth. We should really count our blessings that we are gifted with a Landlord Class who "only" increased rents by 50%-100% on most properties around Dublin over the last five years.

Big government ruin everything! Especially given the fact that FG are by far the least business-friendly party in the State. :roll:

What you seem to be missing is that we have a student visa program which guarantees anywhere between 20,000-70,000 international students, some of whom drop off the radar once here and resurface a number of years later demanding citizenship for their flouting of visa conditions, which ties up an enormous amount of housing.

I am not lambasting foreign students. Obviously that is a bonus for society as a whole and goes a long way towards establishing good will between both communities. Since 2011 this has lead to tens of thousands of students arriving here every year. Now, almost all of them go home, but that doesn't stop more students coming over to occupy those places.

Then you have FG/Labour's success in building next to nothing, not even enough to cover projected population growth without immigration, and you have a field day for all those Landlords who have benevolently decided to cause a bidding war knowing full well that demand is sky high.

This situation can only be mitigated by the re-introduction of the Government into social housing. Thatcherite policies on public services has slowly turned most of the industries privatized in the UK into a living hell, not to mention encourage the inefficiency which was the aim of privatization in the first place.

We have a situation where wages haven't risen in over a decade for most people, the rental market is seeing yearly increases of 10% and the Government is building nothing and signing agreements to import tens of thousands of students while having no intention of housing them responsibly. We've had government ministers outright lie to the Dáil about housing and yet this sort of madness is allowed to persist.

Nothing will change unless there is at least some introduction of stable competition into the market. How lowering taxes on landlords will change anything is beyond me.
 

amist4

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Ah. We should just drop taxes on landlords altogether then. Not taxing wealth is clearly the best way to create wealth. We should really count our blessings that we are gifted with a Landlord Class who "only" increased rents by 50%-100% on most properties around Dublin over the last five years.

Big government ruin everything! Especially given the fact that FG are by far the least business-friendly party in the State. :roll:

What you seem to be missing is that we have a student visa program which guarantees anywhere between 20,000-70,000 international students, some of whom drop off the radar once here and resurface a number of years later demanding citizenship for their flouting of visa conditions, which ties up an enormous amount of housing.

I am not lambasting foreign students. Obviously that is a bonus for society as a whole and goes a long way towards establishing good will between both communities. Since 2011 this has lead to tens of thousands of students arriving here every year. Now, almost all of them go home, but that doesn't stop more students coming over to occupy those places.

Then you have FG/Labour's success in building next to nothing, not even enough to cover projected population growth without immigration, and you have a field day for all those Landlords who have benevolently decided to cause a bidding war knowing full well that demand is sky high.

This situation can only be mitigated by the re-introduction of the Government into social housing. Thatcherite policies on public services has slowly turned most of the industries privatized in the UK into a living hell, not to mention encourage the inefficiency which was the aim of privatization in the first place.

We have a situation where wages haven't risen in over a decade for most people, the rental market is seeing yearly increases of 10% and the Government is building nothing and signing agreements to import tens of thousands of students while having no intention of housing them responsibly. We've had government ministers outright lie to the Dáil about housing and yet this sort of madness is allowed to persist.

Nothing will change unless there is at least some introduction of stable competition into the market. How lowering taxes on landlords will change anything is beyond me.
Link please.
 


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