...BeeCause, there are other areas of reproduction that are of importance...

redhead

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While we argue about the reproductive choices available to humans, there is another species whose reproductive abilities have been considered limited through the excessive use of pesticides.

EU member states voted by qualified majority for a permanent ban on the outdoor use of three types of “neonicotinoid” pesticides after an assessment by the European Food Safety Authority confirmed in February the risk they posed to bees. The move was supported by Ireland and the UK.
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/eu-members-back-ban-on-insecticides-to-protect-honey-bees-1.3476679?mode=amp

According to the EC bees "contribute at least 22 billion EUR each year to the European agriculture industry"and ensure pollination for over 80% of crops and wild plants in Europe."

https://ec.europa.eu/food/animals/live_animals/bees_en

This is particularly relevant to Ireland given that:

"Economic activity in the agricultural and food sector produces a far bigger return than equivalent activity in other traded sectors of the economy. That is because agri-food companies source 74% of raw materials and services from Irish suppliers, compared to 43% for all manufacturing companies."
Source:Teagasc

However, while some quarters have welcomed it, others are concerned with the potential for more hazardous replacements being developed, as well as balancing the need for protecting crops from being damaged by other insects and parasites.

A decade ago the rapid disappearance of Honey Bees in the US was given the name Colony Collapse Disorder. With no identifiable single cause, it was attributed in part to pesticides and in part to parasites.

While the kind of pesticides now banned in Europe have been considered by some the culprit, it has not been conclusively proved.

So have Europe got this one right?

More about Neonicotinoids and Colony Collapse Disorder:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3034041/

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/saving-the-honeybee/

A worldwide survey of neonicotinoids in honey | Science
 


John Scotus

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Huh?

You're trying to shoehorn an abortion angle into the bees and pesticides debate?

Roll on May 26th.
 

redhead

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Huh?

You're trying to shoehorn an abortion angle into the bees and pesticides debate?

Roll on May 26th.
There is no angle, trying to distract from it actually.
 

O'Quisling

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Good thread.

It's to the detriment of our species (nevermind our civilisation) if humanity does not change the Productivist mindset that shapes our relationship with the rest of the environment.

The consequences of a total collapse of bees are simply unfathomable.
 

Mitsui2

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So have Europe got this one right?
On the whole, we'd better hope so!

The consequences for life on the planet of the complete loss of bees is about as catastrophic as it gets.
 

Mitsui2

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The consequences of a total collapse of bees are simply unfathomable.
Ultimately they are; but even in the short term they're fathomable enough to scare the sh1te out of any sensible human being!
 

John Scotus

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Fair enough

Anyway, I've my own few colonies to be checking on
 

redhead

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On the whole, we'd better hope so!

The consequences for life on the planet of the complete loss of bees is about as catastrophic as it gets.
It is a very serious issue, particularly in terms of pollination.

The biggest concern IMO is what will be the replacement for the three banned substances and how closely this will be monitored by regulatory bodies.
 

O'Quisling

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So have Europe got this one right?
The EU is not a homogeneous entity. It's not all good and it's not all bad. There is no denying that the bulk of legislation on the Irish statute books concerning environmental issues came from the EU. And that is a good thing.

Ultimately the much needed changes in our everyday lives have to come from everyone of us. There are limits to enforcing legislation to safeguard our heritage - built and natural. There are competing ideologies at work within the EU - privatisation of former household waste services runs against any long-term efforts at sustainability.
 

redhead

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The EU is not a homogeneous entity. It's not all good and it's not all bad. There is no denying that the bulk of legislation on the Irish statute books concerning environmental issues came from the EU. And that is a good thing.

Ultimately the much needed changes in our everyday lives have to come from everyone of us. There are limits to enforcing legislation to safeguard our heritage - built and natural. There are competing ideologies at work within the EU - privatisation of former household waste services runs against any long-term efforts at sustainability.
I agree. It requires, like most things, a series of checks and balances.

In this particular instance I would imagine the direct and measurable impact on agricultural economics was a more of a consideration than long term protection of the environment, but if the result is positive then it doesn't really matter.
 
D

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A smart guy once said that if the bees disappeared, we'd only be able to survive for four years.

The EU definitely got this one right. Hopefully the rest of the world will follow suit. Anything we can do to ensure the long term survival of our pollinators' population is to be welcomed.
 

Mitsui2

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A smart guy once said that if the bees disappeared, we'd only be able to survive for four years.

The EU definitely got this one right. Hopefully the rest of the world will follow suit. Anything we can do to ensure the long term survival of our pollinators' population is to be welcomed.
One case where I definitely hope your sig never becomes retrospectively applicable.... though feck knows who'd be still around to apply it!
 
D

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One case where I definitely hope your sig never becomes retrospectively applicable.... though feck knows who'd be still around to apply it!
The lead in to my sig went:

"We're at war with the most dangerous enemy that has ever faced mankind in his long climb from the swamp to the stars, and it's been said if we lose that war, and in so doing lose this way of freedom of ours...."

That same fella once said that "Freedom is only one generation away from extinction." It just might be the extinction of the bees.
 

redhead

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The lead in to my sig went:

"We're at war with the most dangerous enemy that has ever faced mankind in his long climb from the swamp to the stars, and it's been said if we lose that war, and in so doing lose this way of freedom of ours...."

That same fella once said that "Freedom is only one generation away from extinction." It just might be the extinction of the bees.
This gave some pause for thought on the fragility of the environment.
https://www.google.ie/amp/s/www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/antelopes-saiga-population-why-extinct-mystery-solved-a8166966.html?amp
 

redhead

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I wonder if Brexit will have an impact on this? Will rogue UK farmers use these banned neonics? And if so what will be the impact for us?

Could we end up with asylum-seeking bees fleeing persecution? Will we have enough hives to accommodate them? Or could they make a valuable contribution to the economy by increasing the quality and quantity of agricultural output? Would Britain's loss be our gain?

It's a lot to think about.
 
D

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[video=youtube;GqA42M4RtxE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqA42M4RtxE[/video]
 

brigg

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I wonder if Brexit will have an impact on this? Will rogue UK farmers use these banned neonics? And if so what will be the impact for us?

Could we end up with asylum-seeking bees fleeing persecution? Will we have enough hives to accommodate them? Or could they make a valuable contribution to the economy by increasing the quality and quantity of agricultural output? Would Britain's loss be our gain?

It's a lot to think about.
Considering how many birds of prey have been killed by illegal poisons, I'd be more worried about rogue Irish farmers.
 

John Scotus

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I wonder if Brexit will have an impact on this? Will rogue UK farmers use these banned neonics? And if so what will be the impact for us?

Could we end up with asylum-seeking bees fleeing persecution? Will we have enough hives to accommodate them? Or could they make a valuable contribution to the economy by increasing the quality and quantity of agricultural output? Would Britain's loss be our gain?

It's a lot to think about.
No need to worry.

As we speak David Davis is working on technology which will stop bees at the border

Sinn Fein will agree apparently so long as it includes a queen excluder
 


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