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Behaviour in schools


cleareyed

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The Minister has appointed a commission to examine the problem of discipline in schools. If you were appointed to the Minister's commission on this topic or if you wanted to make a contribution to its work what would you say from your own experience?
 


Trefor

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cleareyed said:
The Minister has appointed a commission to examine the problem of discipline in schools. If you were appointed to the Minister's commission on this topic or if you wanted to make a contribution to its work what would you say from your own experience?
Mine's a small school in a small village, & behaviour is great. I don't have to do much to ensure this. If someone misbehaves it's quickly added to the list of village scandals - & parents make sure that this doesn't happen.
 

cleareyed

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smiffy said:
I would say that, from my experience, a large-scale, comprehensive survey of the problem should be undertaken, in order to establish what the facts are, rather than relying on anecdotal evidence as the basis for making recommendations.
Yes, and you are meant to be part of the large scale survey. What would your contribution to the survey be? Or is that too small scale for you?
 

smiffy

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cleareyed said:
Yes, and you are meant to be part of the large scale survey. What would your contribution to the survey be? Or is that too small scale for you?
OOoooooohhhhhh! Smell her!

Okay then, my experience is that there far more discipline problems in primary school than there were in secondary school. This may be to do with the levels of maturity of the students in each case, but it might also be linked to the fact that the primary school was located in a disadvantaged area, and drew in students from more disadvantaged backgrounds, while the secondary school didn't. This might be something worth looking at in the context of this study.

However, given that I left secondary school nearly 15 years ago, I think the relevance of my experience is rather limited.
 

cleareyed

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OOoooooohhhhhh! Smell her!
You shall hereafter be known as sniffy.
I think that what you said about background is going to be very interesting to watch as this report develops.
 

flakie

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There has been a lot of progress made with establishing breakfast programmes in schools in north america. Is this done here?

This is along the philosophy that most kids simply don't eat properly at home and (as we do know for certain) diet influences behaviour in children, as does hunger.
 

mjcoughlan

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Well it is not the government that can control behaviour in schools. What the government can do is to provide the framework in which teachers and school principals can take control of discipline in schools. It's my understanding that under the Education Act of 1998 that there is very little that a teacher can do to discipline a student. I haven't read the act but I've been told by a teacher who experiences this on a daily basis that it has even gone to the stage where teachers cannot send disruptive children out of the class in case they wonder off and hurt themselves. Also, if a teacher wishes to give a student a detention for misbehaving, there is this whole bureaucratic process that they have to go through. That, to me, is a disgrace and it is the excessive restrictions on teachers and principals that is leading to more bad behaviour in schools than there would be otherwise.
 

Pidge

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Accountability to parents is a big issue. I know there are many situations where parents don't care or the kids don't care what the parents think. In my school we have a card system (I don't know if other schools use it). Its where at the end of the week the teacher gives each student a mark. This includes homework, classwork and behaviour. If its a bad card, it has to be signed by the parent. If its really bad, the student can get a Friday or Saturday detention based on the card. We had this system in primary school as well.
 

Libero

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flakie said:
There has been a lot of progress made with establishing breakfast programmes in schools in north america. Is this done here?

This is along the philosophy that most kids simply don't eat properly at home and (as we do know for certain) diet influences behaviour in children, as does hunger.
In many areas, yes. Where I first went to primary school, we got sandwiches free at lunch and rock buns on a Friday. And subsidised milk too.
This was done more to tackle kids not being fed much at all at home rather than poor diet itself.

I can' think of how schools can tackle our newer diet problem: kids of all social classes eating too much or not having a balanced diet. That is a different problem than having them go hungry and can't be addressed by feeding them more! Maybe better education about diet would help but I doubt that would be effective.

I think more PE would help with obesity and release some pent-up energy from schoolkids, leading to less indiscipline.
 

jjcarroll

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I think more PE would help with obesity and release some pent-up energy from schoolkids, leading to less indiscipline.
Agree wholeheartedly.

I have always thought that a form of PE should be incorporated in Leaving Cert, whereby students get marks for competing at an individual sport, and also a team sport.

Physical activity should be incentivised in the education system.
 

jjcarroll

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stringjack said:
jjcarroll said:
Physical activity should be incentivised in the education system.
Why?
Here are a few:

To make the education system a more all round experience, and rather than purely focusing on the academic side, a focus that discourages many, emphasis on sport could encourage greater particapation in the education system by more people. There are many students, who have strong interests in sports, but relatively little in the rest of their courses, who may be encouraged to stay on and get a formal quailification.

To help develop good athletes to compete at international level. The more of these that are produced, the better our chances of international sporting success which has known economic benefits.

To help encourage people to take an interest in their own health and fitness, in particular girls. (Admittedly this does not always hold, as my underage rugby teams showed)

To help develop a corporate spirit amongst people through supporting your fellow competitors, rather than the individualist approach that academia fosters.
 

mjcoughlan

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I'm opposed to making PE into a Leaving Cert subject. Many students, usually the brainy ones, are by nature the least sporty. So you could have a situation where a student excels at the academic subjects yet perfoms badly at the physical ones thus placing an unnecessary restriction on them.
 

jjcarroll

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mjcoughlan said:
I'm opposed to making PE into a Leaving Cert subject. Many students, usually the brainy ones, are by nature the least sporty. So you could have a situation where a student excels at the academic subjects yet perfoms badly at the physical ones thus placing an unnecessary restriction on them.
The way I would see it, would be through the incorporation of PE as an eighth subject, and the current points system applying. I would not dismiss the value of PE as a subject, in my view many of the skills (e.g. emphasis on team work) needed to be a good sportsperson, are at least as useful as an ability to speak Irish.
 

Trefor

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mjcoughlan said:
I'm opposed to making PE into a Leaving Cert subject. Many students, usually the brainy ones, are by nature the least sporty. So you could have a situation where a student excels at the academic subjects yet perfoms badly at the physical ones thus placing an unnecessary restriction on them.
In my experience academically gifted children tend to be good with sports as well.

Were you shit with a rugby ball or hurling stick Mark? :wink:
 

TheBanned

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Trefor said:
In my experience academically gifted children tend to be good with sports as well.
Trefor's right. If you look at American football, is there one of them that isn't a college graduate?

And I haven't even mentioned premiership footballers.
 

mjcoughlan

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Trefor said:
In my experience academically gifted children tend to be good with sports as well.

Were you s*** with a rugby ball or hurling stick Mark? :wink:
I was awful at all sports in school - apart from tennis perhaps. Can't stand hurling especially. I can never hit that God-forsaken little ball!
 

Libero

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Arnie to the rescue!

Be still ye girlymen, for Schwarzenegger has the answer...

The Governor of Kal-ih-faunia wants to ban all sales of junk food in public schools in the state and fill vending machines with fresh fuit, vegetables, milk and steroids. OK, I made that last one up... but his proposal seems a good idea. He'll have to compensate schools for lost revenue though. Many of them make hundreds or thousands of dollars from those vending machines.

Story here.
 

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